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  • Deer Hunter/Tree stand Removal

    Was wondering if anyone knows of a company that makes anything like a "cherry picker" that attaches to a tree to get a Litter to a deer hunter that is hanging upside down from his tree stand.

  • #2
    Has this situtation happened to you already?

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, this question came from a situation we had this past weekend where we had a deer hunter that was found after hanging upside down from his treestand for approximately 19 hours. If the treestand would have been even two feet higher than it was we are not sure how we would have gotten the hunter down.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hunter hospitalized after tree stand mishap

        Published Tuesday, December 5, 2006 3:49:06 PM Central Time


        By ERIC HJERSTEDT SHARP

        Globe Staff Writer

        HURLEY -- A 61-year-old Oconomowoc, Wis., man spent Friday evening and most of Saturday morning tangled up in the safety harness of his portable deer stand near his second home on Blue Heron Ridge Road in the town of Oma, according to Iron County Sheriff's Department report.

        Deputy Darrell Petrusha and DNR warden Stuart Pfeiffer found John Walter, who had been hunting deer using a muzzle-loading rifle during black powder season, at about 11 a.m. Saturday. Walters was immediately transported to Howard Young Medical Center in Woodruff, Wis., Petrusha said. Mercer ambulance and fire personnel, as well as Vilas County EMS rescue workers participated in the rescue, which involved cutting Walter out of the safety harness.

        According to the initial ICSD report, Walter's wife from Oconomowoc had called dispatch in Hurley at 8:54 a.m. Saturday because she was concerned her husband hadn't called the night before, as she said he does each night when he's away hunting.

        Deputies went to the couple's Oma home, and found Walter's dog in the back of his pick-up truck. According to information Walter's wife told dispatch Saturday morning, her husband usually kept the dog in the truck when he was out hunting.

        A search of the house revealed Walter was not home. Petrusha and Pfeiffer began searching along an ATV trail about a quarter of a mile from the residence, where Walter's wife said he often sets up his tree stand.

        Shortly after the search got underway, Petrusha heard cries for help coming from the direction of where he was suppose to be hunting.

        "It took about 10 minutes to evacuate him," Petrusha said. "He was in pretty rough shape."

        According to Petrusha, the safety harness kept him from falling out of his tree stand, but Walter got tangled up in the harness, and was unable to right himself during the ordeal.

        Petrusha notified his wife shortly after finding him. He was rushed off to Howard Young Medical Center, where he was treated and shortly afterwards airlifted to Duluth, Minn., for further treatment, according to Petrusha.

        Iron County deputies went back and fed, watered and walked Walter's dog, which they put back in the truck, as his wife had asked.

        Petrusha had not heard from Walter's wife since he initially talked to her, but said she was on her way up to the area. Officials at Howard Young Medical Center did not say what Walter's condition was before he was airlifted.

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        • #5
          mercer526,

          All you need is a rope rescue mechanical advantage system anchored up above the victim to haul him up slightly. That allows you to take the weight off the original harness/safety system. Then you can release him from it and lower him to the ground.

          Just basic high angle technique. Good luck.

          canff2706

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CANFF2706
            mercer526,

            All you need is a rope rescue mechanical advantage system anchored up above the victim to haul him up slightly. That allows you to take the weight off the original harness/safety system. Then you can release him from it and lower him to the ground.

            Just basic high angle technique. Good luck.

            canff2706
            I agree a simple 4 to one system should work good.
            "If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles."
            ********

            IACOJ

            ********

            "Criticism is prejudice made plausible."
            - H. L. Mencken (1880-1956)

            Comment


            • #7
              What the article says and what really happened are two different things. The deer hunter was NOT wearing any type of safety harness. He was using a self climbing tree stand. He had his feet in position to climb with the stand because he was making his way down the tree. He apparently lost his balance and fell backward. With both of his feet stuck in the stand he hung upside-down till he was found the following morning. The stand had to be cut from the tree because his feet were stuck, and he was high enough that we(EMS/Firefighters) were only tall enough to support his upper body. We could not lift him high enough to get his feet from where they were stuck.

              Comment


              • #8
                Two options:

                1. Cut the tree down.
                2. Use the get the cat out of the tree solution. Deck gun.
                RK
                cell #901-494-9437

                Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

                "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


                Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

                Comment


                • #9
                  2 things strike me as a definate problems;
                  1) Getting a secure anchor point above the klutz. Especially in some skinny pine tree
                  2) Trying to get a harness on the guy
                  All the neat pre-made mechanical systems are useless unless they can be set and achored above.
                  Maybe one of those Little Giant ladders? A 26' should do the trick and it's easy enough to hump in. It also has the advantage of being able to climb up both sides. Might be worth trying.
                  My posts reflect my views and opinions, not the organization I work for or my IAFF local. Some of which they may not agree. I.A.C.O.J. member
                  "I ask, Sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them."
                  George Mason
                  Co-author of the Second Amendment
                  during Virginia's Convention to Ratify the Constitution, 1788
                  Elevator Rescue Information

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                  • #10
                    O.K. - I will toss out the standard disclaimer - I'm not an expert but I did sleep in a Holiday Inn Express last night - No really I do have a good background in rope work & I have done several incidents involving hunters & tree stands but only one which required us to get one out of a stand (or off the safety strap actually) and that was a fatality so we weren't really pressed for time.

                    Before I offer any suggestions I will also preface this by saying that before you try ANY rescue technique involving rope, that you undertake the proper training from qualified instructors. The potential forces that can be generated in a rope system by even the lightest load is enough to injure, disable, or kill the victim or any rescuer when done improperly.

                    **********************************************

                    Given the infrequency with which (I hope) you'll be faced with this and an unknown level of expertise - I would not recommend any type of haul system. These take some education & training to set up & some practice to work safely. Instead I would suggest using a couple of single pulleys as a "change of direction" (COD) to get a rope from your victim to a decent control device at the anchor point.

                    Also given the fact that you will probably have an abundant supply of manpower (don't forget you can use bystanders) then getting 3 or 4 big guys to supply the needed muscle to lift the victim with a simple COD shouldn't be a problem either.

                    I also agree with SPFDRum (and CANFF2706) that you are going to need an anchor point above the victim and THAT will be the real trick of the operation.

                    Again - the level of skill & training of your people will come into play here - if you have someone who is proficient in tree climbing (has the correct equipment, and the tree in question is stout enough) then they can scale the tree & create an anchor point (various techniques omitted for brevity)

                    Another alternative would be to throw a rope over a limb above the victim & use that rope to hold a pulley as your high anchor point (be sure to secure the free end of the rope and to allow for natural stretching of the rope as it's loaded).

                    A 3rd option is an extension ladder against the tree as a high anchor point - however (from experience) humping any kind of ladder into some of these places is going to be a fairly time consuming task - even with the aid of 4X4's and ATV's (or horses if you have mounted S&R). Definitely a lot slower than just humping in a rigging bag or two.

                    Also I'd suggest using a rigging rack as your decent control device instead of any type of 8 Plate as they are much easier to operate, less likely to jam from operator error and rated at larger load capacities.

                    Also - please note that all of these suggestions assume that you can at least reach the victim from the ground well enough to secure your rescue line (and harness if needed) to them - if you have to leave the ground and work from anything other than a ladder (or perhaps standing on an ATV) - i.e. on your own rope, then you MUST (let me say that again for emphasis MUST) get proper training.
                    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
                    Stephen
                    FF/Paramedic
                    Instructor

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tree Stand Rescue

                      Hey, we know how this goes, we had a 16 yr old girl fall out of her stand about two months ago. We where able to park a big ATV under her and cut the harnest, getting her down. We had considered taking in a roof ladder and put it in place above her and supporting her with another rope to then cut the connector and letting her down, but did not go this way in the end. The trouble with this type of rescue - you only do it once in a blue moon and every tree is different, along with the woods it in.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by N2DFire View Post
                        before you try ANY rescue technique involving rope, that you undertake the proper training from qualified instructors.

                        Given the infrequency with which (I hope) you'll be faced with this and an unknown level of expertise - I would not recommend any type of haul system. These take some education & training to set up & some practice to work safely.

                        you MUST (let me say that again for emphasis MUST) get proper training.
                        Can I point out that this is NOT a public citizen forum, but a FF forum and, in particular, a specialized rescue section?

                        Do you mind not being so condescending as to assume that those of us discussing this issue are either unaware of the risks or untrained in the proper techniques?

                        - Robert
                        aVERT - a Vertical Emergency Response Training
                        To Avert Disaster in the Vertical Environment

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Riversong, you may be supprised at how few people are actually trained in rope rescue. We train about once a year on it because it is seldom used around here. Some depts may never train on it. You MUST assume some ARE unaware of the risks and some ARE untrained in the proper techniques.
                          Buck
                          Assistant Chief/EMT-B

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=N2DFire;745914]


                            A 3rd option is an extension ladder against the tree as a high anchor point - however (from experience) humping any kind of ladder into some of these places is going to be a fairly time consuming task - even with the aid of 4X4's and ATV's (or horses if you have mounted S&R). Definitely a lot slower than just humping in a rigging bag or two.


                            QUOTE]


                            Well here is my idea. If you feel that the tree is not strong enough to support a rescue line and a safety I feel that ladders are the best option if time permits. I can really see a problem with lugging them into a wooded area. If the tree is not strong enought to support a rescue rope there is also a chance it might not support a ladder depending on the situation, so here's an idea. If you can get two ladders into an area construct an A-Frame with the 2 ladders; tying the tops together. I've down this with 2 roof ladders, but I would not see the problem with 2 extention ladders if you need the extra height. Construct it on the ground and raise it. This gives you a high point for a rope rescue. I figure most of you can figure this out from here. Just my opinion, but really it all depends on the situation, the patient condition, the available equipment, and the manpower.

                            I must say this is a very intresting problem, and a very good topic discussion. Personally, I have had several hunters fall out of tree stands in my career, but they have all made it to the ground prior to ems/rescue arrival (and most not by choice).

                            John Walter
                            Central VFC

                            I not an expert on tree stands, so im just going off what I know.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rescuetech147 View Post
                              If the tree is not strong enought to support a rescue rope there is also a chance it might not support a ladder...
                              If it could support a hunter in a tree stand, it can support a rescue highpoint.

                              If you can get two ladders into an area...
                              Argh... Now it's two ladders to hump into the woods.

                              Just call your neighborhood arborist. The ones trained in tree climbing are sometimes trained in arbor rescue as well. They can at least get a high anchor point installed - either on a natural crotch or a "false crotch", which is something any decent arborist knows how to do. And they don't need climbing spikes to ascend a tree, as long as it has branches.

                              - Robert
                              aVERT - a Vertical Emergency Response Training
                              To Avert Disaster in the Vertical Environment

                              Comment

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