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minimum equipment - Anthrax

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  • quietone
    replied
    We proposed to go level A to suspected anthrax incidents - that was before the calls started coming in. Our 1st "white powder incident" was level A. Since then, our level of knowledge has increased and we have revised our plan of attack. We have been working closely with the PD and things have been less labor / manpower intensive. The PD determines if a threat exists if they can, and if they can't, we assist with standard BSI, SCBA, and decon setup. We don't run many HazMat calls and have tried to err on the side of caution. As we have been educating ourselves, the fear factor has been reduced considerably for not only us as team members, but also the families we return home to. We also are revising a plan for a staged response by members that come from all departments in the county. Instead of paging all members, a request will be made for a smaller response team in a given area. Hopefully, these bio threat calls will diminish. "This too will soon pass" Thanx again no_name_ff for the CDC info.
    C-YA

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  • mpeltier
    replied
    Same deal here (on a federal base no less..) that the PD responds and determines real/BS based on whatever vodoo theory they may have and if need be they call fire. Needless to say they havent called yet. I would have to say level a, scba and decon. I like coming home to try anything else. stay safe

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  • no_name_FF
    replied
    quietone, I don't know where you are from, but I am in Trenton, NJ (home of anthrax?). Here the HazMat teams are responding to so many calls that they can't keep up. (Health lab has over 1,000 samples being tested from last week or so).

    The powers to be have come out with a plan that has PD only respond and get info. If its and envelope they have the occpant bag it 3x and then ship to health. If powder is out, they call hazmat advance team and they either suit up level c and go in or call for full response. They can't afford to go level a every call (both manpower and $$ cost).

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  • quietone
    replied
    Thank you to no_name_ff for the CDC website. It provides just about all the info you would need depending on the level of training. As a HazMat technician and team leader, our unit still prefers the full level A treatment for all instances involving a "suspicious white powder / suspicious package". We have felt that this reduces the "pucker-factor" to our entry teams and also to their families when we return from the call. We would rather err on the side of caution instead of second guessing during the debriefing/evaluation portion by saying, "you know, maybe we should have gone with the higher level of protection". After is too late. No matter how many calls we get, level A it is. Take your time, establish a plan, and be safe. Even with all of the "possible" hazard calls, it makes for good practice when a possibility turns into a REALITY.

    Keep it safe!!!

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  • Neil Murphy
    replied
    Alex1519 I agree with Paul. At the awareness level of training your responsibilities are to resspond, identifiy and notify. Anything outside of that is beyond your training and opens up other problems. Check NFPA 472 foir the competencies of awareness as well as other levels.

    Stay Safe
    Neil

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  • no_name_FF
    replied
    And for the cops and emts
    http://www2.sbccom.army.mil/hld/cwir...t_download.htm

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  • no_name_FF
    replied
    According to the CDC http://www.bt.cdc.gov/DocumentsApp/A...001Protect.asp

    According to the military
    http://www2.sbccom.army.mil/hld/ip/r...ctive_clothing

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  • PaulChristenson
    replied
    If you are not trained to a Hazmat Technician Level, then you really should not be gathering samples...

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  • morales_alexander
    replied
    Ok!! Very thanks for your time!!!

    See you..
    Alex

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  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    Personally, I'd stay away from full Structural PPE -- you know have a major decontamination problem. Can't use bleach to clean nomex or PBI!

    If I had to, my department issues long sleeve coveralls for ambulance duty. A pair of those, a well fitted, disposable HEPA mask, disposable safety glasses & rubber gloves. The coveralls can be washed & disinfected easier than bunker gear; the gloves, googles, and mask simply bagged & trashed. Gosh, that sounds an awful lot like standard Body Substance Isolation measures you take with a highly infectious disease like TB...

    Fortunately, it's not something at our operational level we'd be involved with. Our state (Connecticut) Department of Public Health Labs will only accept samples to test from the State Police ESU, State DEP Haz-Mat, and FBI.

    I'm sure if we had some larger scale incident where a field-decon is needed we'd be in Tyvex bunny suits & SCBA (typical "Class B" suits) rather than jumpsuits & masks. But then again, that's kinda what we'd do on any haz-mat decon situation...

    The more and more I've read, talked, listened, and thought about Anthrax, the more I realize
    1) It's involves a threat assesment...white powder in a laundromat is not a legitimate risk.
    2) If it seems legitimate, still it's mainly a combination of our normal training for Crime Scenes, Body Substance Isolation, and Haz-mat
    3) Above all, I'd prefer to let law enforcement handle it all. Sending an individual officer to take a look, talk calmly with the caller, and evaluate the situation is something their trained to do and do day in day out. Only after they make a determination there's a legitimate risk of it being a dangerous substance should the whole FD/Haz-Mat rigamarole start.

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  • Firehawk007
    replied
    Hi there Alex,
    As a First responder I would suggest the following as bare minumum.

    Full PPE with SCBA - Rather safe than sorry.

    I have noticed whilst reading about the various Departments PPE that they vary.

    1. Class A,B,C suite with SCBA
    2. Fire apparel with SCBA
    3. Coverall with SCBA and gloves
    4. Coverall with respirator and gloves

    We recently had a incident where the PD used a dust mask with latex gloves.... ? risky

    Why wear some that does not protect the skin when we know that it affects the skin on contact. Just a thought..

    Be safe
    Dave

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  • morales_alexander
    replied
    We are a First Repsponder.

    thanks...

    Alex

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  • FFdoc80
    replied
    It depends on your response capabilities. Are you a First Repsponder or Specialist?

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  • morales_alexander
    started a topic minimum equipment - Anthrax

    minimum equipment - Anthrax

    I need Information the minimum equipment to use in harvesting of
    suspicious samples of Anthrax

    Please....null

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