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  • Officer Training

    I have a couple questions that need answering, so I figured I would post them here. People here always have some good ideas where to look and go for the right answers.

    So here it goes:

    #1 - I live in New York State. Is there any legislation, regulations or standards that pertain to the level of training that is necessary to be a Chief or a Chief officer in NY state?

    #2 - If so, where can I find them?

    #3 - Is it right to allow people who have been at a bar (intoxicated or not) to walk across the street to the firehall and run on an EMS call as an EMT or any call for that matter? (Is it good public perception to see firefighters and EMT's come from a bar and go on calls?)

    These are my questions that I would like some more information on. Anything would help me in my research. Thank you.

  • #2
    Officer Training

    #1 - I live in New York State. Is there any legislation, regulations or standards that pertain to the level of training that is necessary to be a Chief or a Chief officer in NY state?
    As far as I know, the only regulations or standards set for the level of training for a Fire Chief or Chief Officer would be set by the municipality if the Fire Department is a Village Owned Department. Independent Fire Departments should have regulations set in their by-laws to the standards and level of training the Chief should have.

    #2 - If so, where can I find them?
    Again, check with the Administrative Officials, if the Department is Village Owned or run through a Municipality. If your Department is an Independent, check through your by-laws.

    #3 - Is it right to allow people who have been at a bar (intoxicated or not) to walk across the street to the firehall and run on an EMS call as an EMT or any call for that matter? (Is it good public perception to see firefighters and EMT's come from a bar and go on calls?)
    This is a very touchy subject, and a check on your liability insurance should be looked into. Drinking laws in many states are getting very stringent, especially if your personnel are driving motor vehicles. This practice is not allowed in many Fire Departments and should be discouraged in all Departments. Years ago (30-40 yrs ago) this practice was the norm, and that is where the Volunteer Fireman received the image of the “drunken bum, who could spray water” Training back then was nil if there was any. Times changed and the job of fighting fires became very technical. Plastics, and hazardous materials became prevalent. Transportation of these materials became more common, and building materials began using these materials more frequently. Training for the Firefighter actually became a life and death issue. The more you knew about these materials, the safer you could contain a situation. In the EMS category, we now have HIV, AIDS, and other communicable diseases that we too need to be protected from. I don’t think any Department wants to be responsible for their members if they respond to alarms in an unfit manner. Public perception will say that anyone leaving a bar to respond to an alarm has been drinking. Is that the way you want your Department to be looked at?

    I hope this helps in your search for answers. Again, Common Sense prevails.
    "The uniform is supposed to say something about you. You get it for nothing, but it comes with a history, so do the right thing when you're in it."
    Battalion Chief Ed Schoales
    from 'Report from Ground Zero' pg 149
    I.A.C.O.J. Member

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    • #3
      training questions

      in maine there are no such requirements other than what the iindividual community sets forth

      the second questions is that perception always rules...so i wold say as a training officer and a Lieut. I would not allow my ff to respond to a call if they had been at a bar.

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      • #4
        Alcohol makes a great subject in oral board questions, where someone shows up exhibiting signs of consuming a given quantity. Any mind-altering consumable will impair judgment, whether in the driver's seat, officer's seat, or in the back of the meat wagon wearing a gold patch & treating patients. If there are laws about this type of thing, I would pursue them. If it's against policy, I would make a stink about it in the department. I don't want some artificially enhanced, soft-melon redlight junky driving me to the hospital, treating my friends & family members, or backing me up in a fire. Life is too precious to accept anyone who holds a beer in one hand and a radio in the other. Good intentions or not, drinks equal NO RESPONSE.


        ~Kevin
        FF/Paramedic
        ~Kevin
        Firefighter/Paramedic
        --^v--^v--^v--^v--
        Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
        Dennis Miller

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