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  • LVFD301
    replied
    Originally posted by Greenacres2
    True, but the results can be devestating. Much depends on the targeted field for enforcement. For presidential elections in recent years, the religious community has been an "enforcement zone". Much of what you see as endorsements/contributions from non-profits likely comes through a separate political action committee (PAC) which somehow puts a legal arms-length between the non-profit and the politics and also allows for lobbying efforts.

    earl

    And understand, I am not argueing that - I just want someplace to go where
    I can see specifics, and know what we are doing .

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • 18truckmedic
    replied
    This kinda got away from what I asked and I appreciate all of your input and insight.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greenacres2
    replied
    Originally posted by LVFD301
    Not doubting you, but can you provide specifics?

    There are thousands of non profits out there that come out in support of various candidates.
    True, but the results can be devestating. Much depends on the targeted field for enforcement. For presidential elections in recent years, the religious community has been an "enforcement zone". Much of what you see as endorsements/contributions from non-profits likely comes through a separate political action committee (PAC) which somehow puts a legal arms-length between the non-profit and the politics and also allows for lobbying efforts.

    earl

    Leave a comment:


  • LVFD301
    replied
    Originally posted by EFD840
    People, PLEASE pay attention to this post. leewhiz is 100% correct. If you're a nonprofit, which fits most every vollie department in the US, and you engage in political activity like endorsing candidates you are in severe peril. The plain truth is you're violating IRS rules and can lose your nonprofit status.

    Not doubting you, but can you provide specifics?

    There are thousands of non profits out there that come out in support of various candidates.

    Leave a comment:


  • EFD840
    replied
    Originally posted by leewhiz
    The way the IRS rules read, I believe that if you do a commercial for a political candidate a fire company could lose their tax exempt status. I'd speak with your tax preparer or a tax lawyer before I would do an endorsement commercial for a politician.
    People, PLEASE pay attention to this post. leewhiz is 100% correct. If you're a nonprofit, which fits most every vollie department in the US, and you engage in political activity like endorsing candidates you are in severe peril. The plain truth is you're violating IRS rules and can lose your nonprofit status.

    Leave a comment:


  • leewhiz
    replied
    You may lose your Non-Profit Status!!

    The way the IRS rules read, I believe that if you do a commercial for a political candidate a fire company could lose their tax exempt status. I'd speak with your tax preparer or a tax lawyer before I would do an endorsement commercial for a politician.

    Leave a comment:


  • DianeC
    replied
    Originally posted by ktb9780
    I am currently aware of one of my clients who, after being instructed to alert the grants liaison person at his local congressmans office of their plight, is now recieving $5000.00 in funding quarterly from that congressman's input and direction. It never hurts folks! These politicians are experts at fundraising, they know where the money is and how and whom to contact to get it. Don't ignore this vital link ot the grants process.
    Yes, this is possible. But it's also very hard depending on where you are, who your member is, what committees they're on, who they get along with (after all, it is politics), etc. The appropriations process is very complicated. It's not to be confused with the AFG/SAFER programs that are decided off Capitol Hill essentially by your peers.

    Leave a comment:


  • DianeC
    replied
    Originally posted by DennisTheMenace
    You don't send letters to go along with your folks applications? While it is not a big help, it can sway things to a positive end for the applications that might be balanceing on the fence.
    I didn't say we didn't do it! Of course we do it! But it doesn't make a difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • LVFD301
    replied
    Our department will endorse most any politician that will bring help to our department.

    Leave a comment:


  • quint1officer
    replied
    Im surprised no one has bylaws against endorsing someone for political office. It was written into ours 75 years ago. Even members can't portray the department so it can't be construed that the department endorses any particular candidate.

    Leave a comment:


  • ktb9780
    replied
    I agree with all of you and would like to ad my two cents. Politicians control the money, period! Although a letter of support is by no means a "magic bullet" it is nonetheless something that conveys to the congressional rep and to the USFA that this is a program that needs to be on the front burner all the time. Squeaky wheels get oiled many times and it never hurts to enlist the aid of your local politicians in resolving your needs and issues. If you application failed, and you congressman is aware it has failed, then their offices may be able to point you to other funding sources that can assist in resolving those issues and I am not specifically referring ot just Federal grant programs.

    I am currently aware of one of my clients who, after being instructed to alert the grants liaison person at his local congressmans office of their plight, is now recieving $5000.00 in funding quarterly from that congressman's input and direction. It never hurts folks! These politicians are experts at fundraising, they know where the money is and how and whom to contact to get it. Don't ignore this vital link ot the grants process.

    Leave a comment:


  • BC79er
    replied
    Actually it won't sway any decisions if you're not already in the potential scoring zone. But if your situation seems to show that you can't afford what you applied for and you have a letter from lots of officials at all levels of government stating that they will help the department meet its obligations if awarded, that would be the difference in Tech Review. You could be passed over if it doesn't seem like you'd be able to meet the requirements of the award. So send them in, it at least makes the offices aware that you are applying for the program and it is still needed. If we don't apply, make noise for more money, and spread the success stories they could cut the funding. We're lucky that there were nearly 3,000 less applications this year and they are still increasing the funding for 2007.

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisTheMenace
    replied
    Originally posted by DianeC
    I hate to be the bearer of more bad news -- Congressmen/women and Senators have no bearing/political influence on awards. And I work for a Congressman who is heavily involved with the fire service, so I know this first hand. We get plenty of e-mails and letters from folks complaining that they have been rejected.

    And yes, the request for the campaign ad has to come from the campaign office. If it's from the Washington office or the District office, it's an ethics violation.
    You don't send letters to go along with your folks applications? While it is not a big help, it can sway things to a positive end for the applications that might be balanceing on the fence.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18truckmedic
    replied
    Just to clarify it was from an election office PR person who lives within our fire district, so in actuality they are quite far down on the food chain and may have no knowledge of our actual grant but rather an intention to get our department PR w/the Congressman. The last post just put me into this into perspective for me.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • DianeC
    replied
    Originally posted by imafireman
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you cannot tell me that there is no political influence on awards. I am not saying you cannot get an award without the letters of support. However, this a federally funded program, operated by individuals with ties to the federal government. I do know that a certain area close to me has received awards three years in a row and coincidently has ties to the regions congressman. Be it as it may, I am going for the letters of support every chance I get!!
    I hate to be the bearer of more bad news -- Congressmen/women and Senators have no bearing/political influence on awards. And I work for a Congressman who is heavily involved with the fire service, so I know this first hand. We get plenty of e-mails and letters from folks complaining that they have been rejected.

    And yes, the request for the campaign ad has to come from the campaign office. If it's from the Washington office or the District office, it's an ethics violation.
    Last edited by DianeC; 08-30-2006, 04:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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