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  • More military advice for Brian

    Seeings how our beloved guru Brian is leaving soon for Leonard Wood, lets see how many pieces of advice we can extend to him.

    Positive advice that is.

    Mine is this,

    1. Arrange to stash some cough drops somewhere. Reason- If one recruit shows up with a cold or cough or anything similar, everyone will catch it. You will be able to sell the cough drops for a buck apiece.

  • #2
    I have one bag of Hall's from Sams Club, might be going back for another 2. Saw that in a boot camp prep article, been scouring for info ever since signing. This would have been easier when I was 19 and knew everything already....
    Brian P. Vickers
    CEO - Vickers Consulting Services, Inc
    FH.com/Firehouse Mag Contributor
    www.helpmewithgrants.com
    www.facebook.com/vcsinc

    Comment


    • #3
      Former E-5th Bat 10th Inf trainee here. If you don't like the weather there, wait 5 minutes. It'll change.

      My advice? Don't be first, don't be last. Do EXACTLY what your sgt tells you, as quickly as humanly possible. Be a gray man, just part of the crowd. Be ready for your sgt to be in your face so close you can check for cavities, just look through him. By the end of BCT, you'll have a ton of stories to tell. That was probably the best 10 weeks of my life.

      Comment


      • #4
        Read over the new PT plans, lots more stuff like shuttle runs and obstacle courses. I'm liking the increase in rounds fired on the range too.
        Brian P. Vickers
        CEO - Vickers Consulting Services, Inc
        FH.com/Firehouse Mag Contributor
        www.helpmewithgrants.com
        www.facebook.com/vcsinc

        Comment


        • #5
          Brian, if you are put on "dorm guard"/fire watch/security" for your dorm at night be cautious of the "security control" access duty. Closely inspect all IDs presented for entry and compare against the authorized entry list; no exceptions. I have seen them flash a ID card quickly with a picture of Magilla Gorilla or Elvis Presly on it or show up at a door carrying a huge load of boxes stating they are the Base Commander and demanding entry where they supposedly can;t get to their ID or the boxes are coxvering ytheir faces, make them put the boxes down and show the ID.

          Oh yea, and practice up on making a collared ( use adollar bill to measure it) hospital cornered bed. Tight enough to bounce a quarter back up into your hand!

          Oh yeah and "Thanks" for putting in your time on that side of "service to country". Welcome to the "vets side of things".Be prepared to chnage your way of thinking on how your view some things.
          Kurt Bradley
          Fire/EMS/EMA Grant Consultant
          " Never Trade Skill for Luck"

          Comment


          • #6
            Forgot about the bed sheet corners, I haven't done that since I was about 8.

            I'll have to pass the tip on checking IDs to the youngin's in the platoon, I don't think they'll know Elvis. After all Jay Leno finds those people on the street every day that can't name "common" knowledge items...
            Brian P. Vickers
            CEO - Vickers Consulting Services, Inc
            FH.com/Firehouse Mag Contributor
            www.helpmewithgrants.com
            www.facebook.com/vcsinc

            Comment


            • #7
              Another one is, bring your own running shoes and be like a fly on the wall and you have a good chance to get by the drill instructors.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate and when you think you have had enough hydrate some more. Thanks for serving the Country and good luck. By the way the youngsters will probably have the most issues with PT and not the "old timer".

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ft. Lost in the Woods

                  I attended boot camp and AIT (Combat Engineer) at Ft. Lost in the Woods. Will never go back there, ever!

                  Some good advice: You just want to be a face in the platoon. Any unnecessary attention and the DI will dog you.

                  When I was there, we had a recruit that did the ultimate sin to really make the drill instructor irate: The recruit whistled at the drill instructors wife!

                  You have never seen an irate DI until a recruit messes with his wife. I thought that DI was going to kill everybody.

                  Get your head shaved, wear your uniform flawless and be a face in the platoon. No unecessary attention that will single you out.

                  Anyone in your platoon that is overweight (ate too many Twinkies) is going to get dogged. Hope you make and keep your weight requirements.

                  Good luck in your military training!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Most have told me recently to just buy shoes there along with everything else. They've been telling everyone they bought the wrong stuff from shoes to skivvies and socks so just going with the bare minimum in a backpack and dealing with it when I get there. New PT regimen looks fun, doing some of those exercises now to get used to them. Can do the stuff, just slower off the line than I used to be.
                    Brian P. Vickers
                    CEO - Vickers Consulting Services, Inc
                    FH.com/Firehouse Mag Contributor
                    www.helpmewithgrants.com
                    www.facebook.com/vcsinc

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      buying sneaker there may be a better idea. They'll have a few plain styles in stock, unless yours are very plain, I might be inclined to leave them. Maybe just a basic toiletries kit would be about it. You can't pack enough to last you 8 weeks.
                      When I was there, reading materials were limited to your skills book (smart book! STill have mine), the bible or letters from home. I think we were limited to about $50 in cash. Not sure what the deal was as far as locks, I know we had 2, not sure if you could take your own. LOCK YOUR LOCKER 100% OF THE TIME!! If you're out of arms reach, lock it!! We had sgt's that loved to turn your crap sideways, and leave a note in shaving cream that they did it.

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                      • #12
                        I've heard the lock thing from many people, those are coming from home. Problem I'm going to have it remembering the new number since I still can't get my high school locker combo out of my head. My running shoes are about shot from use now, need a new pair anyway so figured I'd just get them there. Most of the liquids (shaving cream, etc) I'm figuring on getting there too since I won't be planning to check anything on the flight. Don't want to deal with trying to stick with the group and have to go grab checked luggage.

                        Any comments from anyone about the Q-tips & cotton balls for cleaning the M16? Good, bad, indifferent?
                        Brian P. Vickers
                        CEO - Vickers Consulting Services, Inc
                        FH.com/Firehouse Mag Contributor
                        www.helpmewithgrants.com
                        www.facebook.com/vcsinc

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't remember needing anything that wasn't provided when we cleaned weapons. If you absolutely need them, Im sure the px will have them. I think we got a trip weekly, probably on Sunday. Speaking of which, Basic was probably the last time I went to church regularly. 1 hour of peace made a difference every week.

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                          • #14
                            Basic training

                            Another item that is held very high in basic training, is mail call. Take some Forever Stamps (40 or so) along with you. You can buy paper, envelopes and a pen at the PX. A list of addresses of those you write to, is helpful.

                            The younger generation is very engaged in texting and cell phones. When those are taken away, they will be lonely. US Mail, along with an occasional phone call, is what will connect you to family and friends.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I figured on bringing alot of stamps, have to write the kids. Well the 4 year old anyway, 8 month old will probably just chew on them to help with the teething.
                              Brian P. Vickers
                              CEO - Vickers Consulting Services, Inc
                              FH.com/Firehouse Mag Contributor
                              www.helpmewithgrants.com
                              www.facebook.com/vcsinc

                              Comment

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