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  • Hurricanes, flooding, earthquakes, death and destruction across the globe ...

    Earthquake follows flooding in Central America
    Associated Press

    GUATEMALA CITY — With food and water running out, governments in Central America and Mexico scrambled Friday to reach isolated areas devastated by a week of intense rain, with residents saying panic was starting to grow among survivors.

    Mudslides and flooding exacerbated by Hurricane Stan killed 258 people across the region, with Guatemala bearing the brunt of the damage and deaths.

    Increasing fears Friday was a strong earthquake that shuddered through both Guatemala and El Salvador. The quake caused a rain-damaged highway bridge to collapse in Guatemala and also sent thousands of frightened Salvadoran residents into the streets.

    There were no immediate reports of injuries from the quake, with a preliminary magnitude of 5.8. Telephone service was cut off briefly in some areas of El Salvador, and Interior Minister Rene Figueroa urged residents to obey evacuation orders for high-risk areas.

    The quake also forced officials to suspend their search for two coffee workers missing since Saturday when the Ilamatepec volcano erupted about 40 miles west of the capital, San Salvador.

    The earthquake struck before residents had even begun to recover from the five days of heavy rains, which included Hurricane Stan's landfall on Tuesday in Mexico's Gulf Coast state of Veracruz before it weakened into a tropical depression.

    "We need food, clothing, medicine and help," said Lucas Ajpus, a former firefighter coordinating rescue efforts in Santiago Atitlan, the Guatemalan city near landslides that hit four villages.

    At least 50 bodies have been recovered, bringing Guatemala's death toll to 160. Workers continued to search for more than 100 people still missing.

    Ajpus said the bodies were found in two days of searching an area of 1,075 square feet. "There's still a lot to be done, because two towns have disappeared completely," he said.

    In Pathulul, 30 miles away from Santiago Atitlan, creeks that normally stream down from the highlands had turned into raging rivers, cluttered with rocks, branches and chunks of debris.

    Guatemalan officials organized an air-rescue squad of their own helicopters as well as those lent by the United States and neighboring Mexico. But poor weather prevented them from taking off until Friday.

    "We are going to review reconstruction policies and other important avenues to restore our country," Guatemalan President Oscar Berger said.

    Residents and tourists in Panajachel, on the banks of Lake Atitlan, said they needed aid.

    "Water is running out, food is running out and looters are coming now," said Stephanie Jolluck, a 32-year-old businesswoman from Atlanta who was reached by telephone.

    Jolluck, who has traveled to Guatemala for work since 1999, fought back tears as she described watching rivers grow from their usual width of 6 feet to more than 50 feet.

    Berger planned to visit the areas hit by landslides, including the town of Solola near Lake Atitlan, as well as the western province of San Marcos, on the border with Mexico, where residents cut off by floods have been pleading for help in telephone calls to radio stations.

    The president said government workers with heavy machinery cleared fallen trees and dirt from a portion of the InterAmerican Highway, allowing rescuers to reach isolated communities. The country's important Pacific coast highway remained impassable, however, after three bridges were washed out.

    More than 270 communities have been affected by the floods and landslides, forcing the evacuation of more than 30,000 people, according to the country's disaster management agency.

    In El Salvador, the death toll rose Friday to 67 after two people were buried in separate mudslides, said Cesar Marroquin of the National Emergency Committee.

    More than 62,000 people had been evacuated, including 5,000 removed Friday.

    Mexican President Vicente Fox was to make a second trip Friday to the city of Tapachula, near the border with Guatemala, where a river overflowed, carrying off houses and people, washing out bridges, and cutting off communications.

    He promised to use rising oil profits to help victims of the storms.

    On Friday, floodwaters were receding, leaving homes full of mud.

    Forecasters predicted heavy rain for later this weekend, however.

    Tearful Tapachula residents, their clothes soaked and their eyes desperate, appeared on television news reports begging government officials to help them recover their belongings and to find missing relatives.

    Shelters were packed with families, including small babies. Doctors attended to some, but many complained there wasn't enough food, clothing or other basic supplies.

    Eight people have died in Chiapas, while civil protection authorities reported six deaths in the state of Veracruz, and three in Oaxaca.

    Farther south in Colombia, a landslide triggered by heavy rain Thursday night killed at least 26 people, many of them children, and left about 30 others missing, according to officials in the town of Bello, about 160 miles northwest of Bogota.

    At least 11 of the bodies pulled from the mud those killed were children, Gen. Ruben Carrillo, police chief of Antioquia state, told RCN television on Friday.

    Municipal official Claudia Helena Velez said more than 100 people, including firefighters and members of the civil defense agency, were taking part in the rescue. Local television video showed rural peasants with shovels looking for loved ones.
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

    Sheri
    IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
    Honorary Flatlander

    RAY WAS HERE FIRST

  • #2
    Couldn't decide where to put this ...

    Maybe this forum should be renamed "Natural Disasters"! Interesting that there were two earthquakes around the same time on opposite sides of the world.



    More than 3,000 believed dead in Asian quake
    CTV.ca News Staff

    A powerful 7.6-magnitude earthquake near the Pakistan-India border triggered landslides and reduced entire villages to rubble Saturday, killing more than 3,000 people.

    "The damage and casualties could be massive and it is a national tragedy," Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan, Pakistan's chief army spokesman, told The Associated Press. "This is the worst earthquake in recent times."

    Officials believe the worst of the damage to be in Kashmir, although the temblor also rattled India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan.

    Details have been difficult to obtain because telephone lines are down, cellphone networks overwhelmed and roads impassable.

    "The earthquake was so strong it was felt right across Pakistan, northern India, and Afghanistan," CTV's Matt McClure reported from India, where he is watching developments.

    "Here in Delhi, paintings swung from the walls, candlesticks toppled over from tables and people rushed from their homes fearing they would collapse," he told CTV Newsnet.

    Two-hundred-eighty-six Canadians are registered in the region, Foreign Affairs Canada told CTV News.

    Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf and Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz ordered the military to extend "all-out help" to devastated areas and appealed to the nation to stay calm.

    "It is a test for all of us. It is a test for me, of the Prime Minister, of the government and of the entire nation and I am sure we will succeed," Musharraf said.

    About 1,000 people were killed in Pakistani Kashmir, said Sardar Mohammed Anwar, the top government official in the area. About 200 soldiers were included in that toll.

    "This is my conservative guess, and the death toll could be much higher," Anwar told Pakistan's Aaj television station.

    Most homes in Muzaffarabad, the area's capital, suffered damage. Schools and hospitals had collapsed, he said.

    On the Indian side of the disputed territory, about 250 people are believed to have died.

    One major tragedy occured when a school's collapse killed 250 girls in northwestern Pakistan.

    Another 500 students were injured, said Ataullah Khan Wazir, police chief in the northwestern district of Mansehra.

    The North West Frontier province suffered 1,600 deaths, an official said.

    Interior Minister Aftab Sherpao told local television: "We have reports that several entire villages have been wiped out."

    According to the U.S. Geological Survey's website, the quake struck at 8:50 a.m. local time. It was centred about 80 km northeast of Islamabad in the forested mountains of Pakistani Kashmir.

    The first quake was followed by a series of frightening aftershocks between magnitudes of 5.4 and 6.3, also felt across the subcontinent.

    In other developments on Saturday:

    Canadians who have Canadian family members in the region can contact Foreign Affairs Canada at 1-800-387-3124 to seek more information.

    Rescue teams are scrambling to reach dozens of residents trapped in a 10-storey apartment building that collapsed in Islamabad.

    In eastern Afghanistan, a home's collapsed wall crushed an 11-year-old girl to death when a wall, police reported.

    The quake also jolted parts of Bangladesh, but no casualties or damage have been reported there.
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

    Sheri
    IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
    Honorary Flatlander

    RAY WAS HERE FIRST

    Comment


    • #3
      The death toll in Pakistan, India and Afghanistan is now up to 18,000.

      Comment


      • #4
        Up to 30,000.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow, didn't expect to wake up to that news
          September 11th - Never Forget

          I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

          Sheri
          IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
          Honorary Flatlander

          RAY WAS HERE FIRST

          Comment


          • #6
            Death toll soars to 30,000 in South Asian quake
            CTV.ca News

            Pakistan says at least 30,000 people have been killed by Saturday's massive earthquake and there are fears the death toll could rise much higher.

            Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf called the 7.7 magnitude quake the country's worst on record and appealed for urgent help.

            "We do seek international assistance. We have enough manpower but we need financial support ... to cope with the tragedy," he said.


            Musharraf said supplies were needed "to reach out to the people in far-flung and cut-off areas."

            The president spoke in Rawalpindi, a city near the capital Islamabad, before leaving for a tour of devastated areas.


            The worst destruction was in and near the Pakistani side of the divided and disputed Himalayan territory of Kashmir, where the quake flattened dozens of villages and towns, crushing schools and mud-brick houses.

            The dead included 250 girls at a school razed to the ground and more than 200 Pakistani soldiers on duty in the Himalayas.

            The quake, which struck just before 9 a.m. local time, was felt across a wide swath of South Asia from central Afghanistan to western Bangladesh.

            It swayed buildings in the capitals of three nations, with the damage spanning at least 250 miles from Jalalabad in Afghanistan to Srinagar in northern Indian territory.

            In Islamabad, a 10-story building collapsed.

            Worst in history

            "We are handling the worst disaster in Pakistan's history," chief army spokesman Major General Shaukat Sultan said.

            Dozens of bodies were strewn on the streets of Balakot, a devastated village of about 30,000 just west of Pakistani-controlled Kashmir.


            Villagers desperate to find survivors dug with bare hands through the debris of a collapsed school, searching for children that were heard crying beneath the rubble.

            The worst-hit city in Pakistani Kashmir was its capital, Muzaffarabad, where at least 11,000 died. At least 42,000 are injured.

            Helicopters and C-130 transport planes took troops and supplies to damaged areas on Sunday. But landslides and rain hindered rescue efforts, blocking roads to some remote areas.

            The United States, the United Nations, Britain, Russia, China, Turkey, Japan, German and India have all offered assistance.

            Authorities in India reported 360 deaths and 900 people injured, while Afghanistan reported four killed.

            Pakistani military helicopters ferried troops and supplies to some hard-hit areas on Sunday.

            But there was no sign of government help in Balakot, in the North West Frontier Province about 60 miles north of Islamabad.


            The quake leveled the village's main bazaar, crushing shoppers and strewing gas cylinders, bricks, tomatoes and onions on the streets.

            Dozens of villagers, some with sledgehammers but many without any tools, pulled at the debris and carried away bodies.

            Elsewhere in Balakot two primary schools, one for boys and one for girls, also collapsed. More than 500 students were feared dead.

            In Pakistan's northwestern district of Mansehra, police chief Ataullah Khan Wazir told The Associated Press that authorities there pulled 250 bodies from the wreckage of one girls' school in the village of Ghari Habibibullah.

            Dozens of children were feared killed in other schools.

            On the India side of the border, at least 39 soldiers were killed when their bunkers collapsed, said Col. H. Juneja, an Indian army spokesman.

            The only serious damage reported in Pakistan's capital was the collapse of a 10-story apartment building, where at least 24 people were killed and dozens were injured.

            Doctors said the dead included an Egyptian diplomat, and the Japanese Foreign Ministry in Tokyo said two Japanese were killed.

            The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake was centered about 60 miles northeast of the capital, Islamabad, in the forested mountains of Pakistani Kashmir, and was followed by 22 aftershocks within 24 hours, including a 6.2-magnitude temblor.

            Hospitals moved quake victims onto lawns, fearing tremors could cause more damage, and many people spent the night in the open.

            India, a longtime rival of Pakistan, offered help and condolences in a gesture of cooperation.

            The nuclear rivals have been pursuing peace after fighting three wars since independence from British rule in 1947, two of them over Kashmir.

            India reported at least 360 people killed and 900 injured when the quake collapsed houses and other buildings in Jammu-Kashmir state.

            Most of the deaths were in the border towns of Uri, Tangdar and Punch and in the city of Srinagar, said B.B. Vyas, the state's divisional commissioner.

            Afghanistan appeared to suffer the least damage. In its east, an 11-year-old girl was crushed to death when a wall in her home collapsed, police official Gafar Khan said. Three others also died.

            A U.S. military spokesman, Lt. Col. Jerry O'Hara, said the quake was felt at Bagram, the main American base in Afghanistan, but there were no reports of damage at bases around the country.

            An eight-member U.N. team of top disaster coordination officials was due to arrive in Islamabad on Sunday to plan the global body's response.

            President Bush offered condolences, and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the United States was ready to help.

            Canadian assistance

            Meanwhile the Canadian government has promised at least $300,000 for immediate aid to regions devastated by the earthquake.

            Prime Minister Paul Martin said in a statement Saturday that Canadian officials are working with governments, international relief agencies and other organizations in the region to determine the need for financial aid and other assistance.

            Martin pledged $100,000 to the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies for an early-needs assessment, with an additional $200,000 to the Canadian High Commission in Pakistan to respond to urgent requirements.

            "Canada stands ready to provide further assistance depending on the needs identified," Martin said.


            Canadian consular officials said Saturday evening that, so far, there are no Canadian casualties.
            September 11th - Never Forget

            I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

            Sheri
            IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
            Honorary Flatlander

            RAY WAS HERE FIRST

            Comment


            • #7
              Entire generation wiped out in South Asia quake
              CTV.ca News Staff

              Pakistan's military spokesman has said an entire generation has been wiped out in the areas worst hit by Saturday's massive earthquake.

              Major General Shaukat Sultan told the AFP news agency that children had been the biggest casualties.

              Thousands were killed when school buildings collapsed on them in the country's worst natural disaster on record.

              Death toll estimates range from 20,000 to 30,000, but some reports put the toll as high as 40,000. At least 43,000 are injured.

              Meanwhile shopkeepers clashed with looters and hungry families huddled under tents as they waited for relief supplies after the 7.6-magnitude earthquake razed entire villages and buried roads in rubble.

              The United Nations said more than 2.5 million people have been left homeless and doctors are warning of an outbreak of disease unless aid arrives soon.

              With landslides blocking roads to many of the worst-hit areas, Pakistan's army was flying food, water and medicine into the disaster zone.

              International relief efforts cranked into action, and an American plane full of relief supplies landed at an air base near Pakistan's capital Islamabad on Monday.

              Most of the dead were in Pakistan's mountainous north. India reported more than 800 deaths and Afghanistan reported four.

              In the shattered streets of Muzaffarabad, where at least 11,000 people died, an Associated Press reporter saw shopkeepers scuffle with people trying to break into businesses.

              They beat each other with sticks and threw stones, and some people suffered head wounds. No police were nearby.

              Residents of Muzaffarabad, the capital of Pakistan's portion of divided Kashmir, said looters also targeted deserted homes.

              Survivors lack food and water, and AP reported little sign of any official coordination of relief in the devastated city of 600,000.

              People huddled around campfires through the cold night on a soccer field on the city's university campus, where most buildings had collapsed and hundreds were feared buried in classrooms and dormitories.

              A doctor, Iqbal Khan, said there was a serious risk of diseases such as diarrhea and pneumonia if drinking water and other relief supplies do not arrive quickly.

              "These people feel as if there is no one to take care of them," he told AP.

              Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf has appealed for urgent help, particularly cargo helicopters to reach remote areas.

              U.S. President Bush on Sunday promised cash and said he had told Musharraf "we want to help in any way we can."

              U.S. forces in Afghanistan prepared to send five Chinook transport helicopters and three Blackhawk helicopters to Pakistan on Monday to help ferry relief supplies.

              India, a longtime rival of Pakistan, offered help in a gesture of cooperation. The nuclear-armed neighbors have been pursuing peace after fighting three wars since independence from British rule in 1947, two of them over the Kashmir region.

              Other international aid, including emergency rescue workers, began to flow in. Planes arrived from Turkey, Britain, Japan and the United Arab Emirates. Russia, China and Germany also offered assistance.

              Senior officials in Pakistan's portion of Kashmir put the death toll much higher than official reports suggest.

              The top elected official in the region, Sardar Sikandar Hayat, said that more than 25,000 people had died there with "countless" injured. Tariq Mahmood, the province's communications minister, put the toll at over 30,000.


              The quake was felt across a wide swath of South Asia, with damage spanning at least 250 miles, from Jalalabad in Afghanistan to Srinagar in northern Indian territory.


              In Geneva, the United Nations urgently appealed for donations, including for at least 200,000 winterized tents.

              On the Indian side of the militarized Kashmir border -- where at least 800 have died -- hundreds of Kashmiris spent Sunday night outside in the cold after rumors of another quake.
              September 11th - Never Forget

              I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

              Sheri
              IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
              Honorary Flatlander

              RAY WAS HERE FIRST

              Comment


              • #8
                That's great, it starts with an earthquake, birds and snakes, an aeroplane and Lenny Bruce is not afraid.
                Eye of a hurricane, listen to yourself churn - world serves its own needs, dummy serve your own needs.
                Feed it off an aux speak, grunt, no, strength, Ladder start to clatter with fear fight down height.
                Wire in a fire, representing seven games, a government for hire and a combat site.
                Left of west and coming in a hurry with the furies breathing down your neck.
                Team by team reporters baffled, trumped, tethered cropped.
                Look at that low playing! Fine, then.
                Uh oh, overflow, population, common food, but it'll do.
                Save yourself, serve yourself.
                World serves its own needs, listen to your heart bleed dummy with the rapture and the revered and the right, right.
                You vitriolic, patriotic, slam, fight, bright light, feeling pretty psyched.

                It's the end of the world as we know it.
                It's the end of the world as we know it.
                It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine.


                Six o'clock - TV hour. Don't get caught in foreign towers.
                Slash and burn, return, listen to yourself churn.
                Locking in, uniforming, book burning, blood letting.
                Every motive escalate. Automotive incinerate.
                Light a candle, light a votive. Step down, step down.
                Watch your heel crush, crushed, uh-oh, this means no fear cavalier.
                Renegade steer clear!
                A tournament, tournament, a tournament of lies.
                Offer me solutions, offer me alternatives and I decline.

                It's the end of the world as we know it.
                It's the end of the world as we know it.
                It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine
                .

                The other night I dreamt of knives, continental drift divide.
                Mountains sit in a line, Leonard Bernstein. Leonid Brezhnev, Lenny Bruce and Lester Bangs.
                Birthday party, cheesecake, jelly bean, boom!
                You symbiotic, patriotic, slam book neck, right? Right.

                It's the end of the world as we know it.
                It's the end of the world as we know it. can't I have some time alone?
                It's the end of the world as we know it can't I have some time alone? and I feel fine...fine...

                It's the end of the world as we know it.
                It's the end of the world as we know it. can't I have some time alone?
                It's the end of the world as we know it can't I have some time alone? and I feel fine...fine...
                ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
                NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
                343
                CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
                LT. John Ginley Engine 40
                FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
                FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
                FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
                FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
                FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
                FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
                FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
                FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
                FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

                Charleston 9
                "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
                *******************CLICK HERE*****************

                Comment


                • #9
                  OK, Ray
                  September 11th - Never Forget

                  I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                  Sheri
                  IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                  Honorary Flatlander

                  RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Little hope for Guatemalan village buried by mudslide
                    Last Updated Mon, 10 Oct 2005 15:56:08 EDT
                    CBC News

                    Maya Indian villagers have given up hope of finding up survivors buried under a huge Guatemala mudslide triggered by Hurricane Stan. A huge lake of mud has wiped out the village of Panabaj and sniffer dogs were being used to lead an almost hopeless search.


                    A Panabaj resident searches for victims amidst mud and debris. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty)

                    "At this stage, the bodies they could find are in a very advanced state of decomposition," said Mario Ramirez, the head of a Guatemalan rescue team of firefighters.


                    RELATED STORY: Oct. 8: 1,400 dead in one Guatemala village as Stan blasts Central America

                    "I don't think there is any hope of finding anyone alive, but we are going to try," said Spaniard Francisco Toledano.

                    Panabaj was buried under a layer covering of mud, rocks and trees that poured hundreds of metres down a nearby when rain from Hurricane Stan hit Central America and southern Mexico last week.

                    The fire department put the death toll at around 1,400. Only 76 bodies have been found so far.

                    U.S. and Guatemalan military helicopters were being used to reach towns that had been cut off by floodwaters.


                    A picture of a father with his son, apparently buried under a landslide, hangs from a string while residents search for bodies in Panabaj. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty)
                    There has been a great deal of criticism leveled at Guatemala President Óscar Berger's government for responding too slowly to the tragedy. Add to that anger because senior officials have not visited the site of the disaster.

                    "I feel totally sad, morale is very low. We want to see the president, we want to see him here," said Diego Esquina, mayor of Santiago Atitlan municipality, which runs Panabaj. The mayor felt racism was to blame.

                    "It's like they are giving a message that it is because we are indigenous. That is the point. A lot of my people are saying it is because we are indigenous," Esquina said.

                    The rains from Stan killed at least 400 people elsewhere in Guatemala and more than 100 others in neighbouring countries.



                    Headlines: World

                    Little hope for Guatemalan village buried by mudslide
                    Help beginning to reach Pakistan quake victims, Canada increases aid
                    German parties reach deal, Merkel to become chancellor
                    Rescuers hunt for South Asia quake survivors
                    Nobel Prize for Economics awarded for game theory research
                    No clear winner for Polish president, run-off to be held
                    Karzai aide condemns women in Afghan beauty contest
                    New Orleans open for business, can't find enough workers
                    Civil war forecast in Iraq
                    Bird flu reported in Romania and Turkey
                    2005 Nobel Peace Prize shared by UN nuclear watchdog, leader
                    European Polar satellite breaks up, falls into ocean
                    Auto parts maker Delphi files for bankruptcy

                    http://sympatico.msn.cbc.ca/story/wo...e20051010.html
                    September 11th - Never Forget

                    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                    Sheri
                    IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                    Honorary Flatlander

                    RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Help beginning to reach Pakistan quake victims, Canada increases aid
                      Last Updated Mon, 10 Oct 2005 14:40:25 EDT
                      CBC News
                      International assistance is beginning to arrive in Pakistan following the weekend's deadly earthquake there. The quake has killed at least 20,000 people, with some estimates putting that number as high as 30,000.


                      A man and a woman cry near the body of the man's grandson in Udoosa, India on Monday. India and Pakistan set aside their rivalry Monday when Pakistan said it would accept India's offer of aid. (AP Photo/Press Trust Of India)
                      Canada raised its aid contribution to $20 million on Monday. Most of the money will go to international aid organizations.

                      But Aileen Carroll, Canada's minister of International Cooperation, said funds will go to dispatching Canadian Forces aircraft containing 21 tonnes of blankets.

                      Canada had already announced a $300,000 donation, which critics called a paltry sum.

                      RELATED STORY: Oct. 9: Canada to give at least $300,000 for deadly Pakistan-India quake

                      Eight United States military helicopters with supplies reached Islamabad Monday. The helicopters will help ferry supplies and rescue teams to areas inaccessible by road because of landslides.

                      The U.S. has also pledged $50 million US in earthquake relief money to Pakistan.

                      Setting aside old rivalries, Pakistan said it would accept earthquake aid from India. Israel, which does not have diplomatic relations with Pakistan, also offered assistance.

                      RELATED STORY: Rescuers hunt for South Asia quake survivors
                      Several other countries and world bodies are committing themselves to helping quake victims:

                      The Asian Development Bank offered to reallocate $10 million US for immediate assistance for the worst-affected areas of Pakistan.
                      The International Red Cross will provide emergency food and shelter to 120,000 vulnerable people stranded in the freezing autumn conditions.
                      NATO offered troops, aircraft and humanitarian aid to Pakistan.
                      Fifty German troops have already been sent from NATO's peacekeeping force in neighbouring Afghanistan.
                      The European Union has aid workers on the ground in Pakistan and has allocated 3.6 million euros ($4.4 million US) in initial aid.
                      Kuwait donated $100 million US for quake relief; Yemen said it would send two aid planes.
                      Russia, the United Arab Emirates and Spain have sent sniffer dogs, while specialist rescue teams had been sent by Britain, France, China and Turkey.

                      http://sympatico.msn.cbc.ca/story/wo...d20051010.html
                      September 11th - Never Forget

                      I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                      Sheri
                      IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                      Honorary Flatlander

                      RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Athens, 430 B.C.: Typhus epidemic
                        Pompei, 79: Volcanic eruption
                        Antioch, Syria, 526: Earthquake (250,000 dead)
                        Costantinopole, 542: Bubonic plague
                        Beirut, Lebanon, 551: earthquake and tsunami (tens of thousands dead)
                        Japan, 1181: famine (100,000 dead)
                        Holland, 1228: sea flood (100,000 dead)
                        Chihli, China, 1290: Earthquake (100,000 dead)
                        Europe and Asia, 1346-52: Bubonic plague or "black death" (one third of the European population dead plus millions in Asia and North Africa for a total of 25 million)
                        Shensi, China, 1556: earthquake (800,000 dead)
                        Napoli, Italy, 1631: Mt Vesuvius erupts (3,000 dead)
                        Havana, 1648: Yellow fever epidemic
                        Sevilla, Spain, 1649: Plague (80,000 dead)
                        Turkey, 1668: earthquake (8,000 dead)
                        Hokkaido, 1730: Earthquake (140,000 dead)
                        Lisbon, 1755: earthquake and tsunami (30,000 dead)
                        Calcutta, 1737: Earthquake (300,000 dead)
                        Bengal, India, 1769: famine (10 million dead)
                        India, 1775: Tsunami (60,000 dead)
                        Northamerica, 1775-82: Smallpox (130,000 dead)
                        Iran, 1780: earthquake (200,000 dead)
                        Caribbeans, 1780: Hurricane (22,000 dead)
                        Philadelphia, 1793: Yellow fever epidemic (5,000 dead)
                        Sumbawa, Indonesia, 1815: Mt Tambora erupts (90,000 dead)
                        Japan, 1826: Tsunami (27,000 dead)
                        Cairo, 1831: Cholera epidemic, which spreads to London
                        London and Paris, 1832: Cholera epidemic (25,000 dead)
                        Ireland, 1845: famine (one million dead)
                        Mapoli, Italy, 1857: earthquake (11,000 dead)
                        India, 1864: Cyclone (70,000 dead)
                        France, 1870-71: Smallpox (500,000 dead)
                        Bangladesh, 1876: Cyclone (200,000 dead)
                        China, 1876-78: Drought (9 million dead)
                        China, 1881: Typhoon (300,000 dead)
                        Indonesia, 1883: Tsunami (36,000 dead)
                        Huayan Kou, China, 1887: Yang-tse Kiang flooding (one million dead)
                        Mino-owari, Japan, 1891: earthquake (7,000 dead)
                        Sanriku, Japan, 1896: Tsunami (27,000 dead)
                        India, 1897: earthquake (1,500 dead)
                        Galveston, 1900: Hurricane (8,000 dead)
                        Martinique, 1902: Volcano (38,000 dead)
                        San Francisco, 1906: earthquake and fire (3,000 dead)
                        Colombia, 1906: earthquake (1,000 dead)
                        Chile, 1906: earthquake (20,000 dead)
                        China, 1907: famine (20 million dead)
                        Messina, Italy, 1908: 7.5 earthquake (70,000 dead)
                        Mexico City, 1911: earthquake
                        Worldwide, 1918: Influenza pandemic (25-100 million dead)
                        Gansu, China, 1920: 8.6 earthquake (200,000 dead)
                        Ukraine, 1921: Famine (5 million dead)
                        Yokohama, Japan, 1923: 8.3 earthquake (143,000 dead)
                        Nanshan, China, 1927: 8.3 earthquake (200,000 dead)
                        China, 1928: Famine (3 million dead)
                        Florida, USA, 1928: Hurricane (1800 dead)
                        China, 1931: Flooding (3.7 million dead)
                        Ukraine and Russia, 1932: Famine (5 million dead)
                        Gansu, China, 1932: 7.6 earthquake (70,000 dead)
                        Sanriku, Japan, 1933: 8.4 earthquake (3,000 dead)
                        Bihar, India, 1934: 8.1 earthquake (10,700 dead)
                        Quetta, Pakistan, 1935: 7.5 earthquake (60,000 dead)
                        China, 1936: Famine (5 million dead)
                        New York, USA, 1938: Rains (600 dead)
                        Erzincan, Turkey, 1939: 7.8 earthquake (33,000 dead)
                        China, 1941: Famine (3 million dead)
                        Bengal, India, 1943: famine (3.5 million dead)
                        Tonankai, Japan, 1944: 8.1 earthquake (1,200 dead)
                        Nankaido, Japan, 1946: earthquake (1,330 dead)
                        Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, 1948: earthquake (100,000 dead)
                        Assam, India, 1950: earthquake (1,526 dead)
                        Holland, 1953: Sea flood (1,794 dead)
                        Iran, 1953: Rain flood (10,000 dead)
                        Louisiana, USA, 1957: Hurricane (400 dead)
                        Worldwide, 1957: Influenza pandemic (about four million dead)
                        Japan, 1958: Typhoon (5,000 dead)
                        China, 1960: Famine (20 million dead)
                        Morocco, 1960: earthquake (10,000 dead)
                        Chile, 1960: 9.5 earthquake (5,700 dead)
                        Mt Huascaran, Peru, 1962: Volcano eruption (3,000)
                        India, 1965: Famine (1.5 million dead)
                        Worldwide, 1968: Influenza pandemic (about 750,000 dead)
                        China, 1969: Famine (20 million dead)
                        North Peru, 1970: 7.8 earthquake (66,000 dead)
                        Bangladesh, 1970: Sea flood (200-500,000 dead)
                        Vietnam, 1971: Red River flood (100,000 dead)
                        Nicaragua, 1972: earthquake flood (10,000 dead)
                        Bangladesh, 1974: floods (28,000 dead)
                        Ethiopia, 1974: famine (200,000 dead)
                        Haicheng, China, 1975: 7.0 earthquake (10,000 dead)
                        Tangshan, China, 1976: 8.0 earthquake (750,000 dead)
                        Guatemala, 1976: earthquake (23,000 dead)
                        Andhra Pradesh, India, 1977: cyclone (10,000 dead)
                        Caribbeans, 1979: Hurricane (2,000 dead)
                        Mexico, 1982: volcanic eruption (1,800 dead)
                        Yemen, 1982: earthquake (3,000 dead)
                        Bhopal, India, 1984: Chemical pollution (3,800 dead)
                        Ethiopia, 1984: Famine (900,000 dead)
                        Ciudad de Mexico, 1985: 8.1 earthquake (9,500 dead)
                        Colombia, 1985: Volcano (25,000 dead)
                        Armenia, 1988: earthquake (55,000 dead)
                        Colombia, 1985: eruption of Nevado del Ruiz (23,000 dead)
                        Bangladesh, 1988: Monsoon flood (1,300 dead)
                        Gilan and Zanjan, Iran, 1990: 7.7 earthquake (35,000 dead)
                        Bangladesh, 1991: tsunami (138,000 dead)
                        Latur, India, 1993: earthquake (22,000 dead)
                        Kobe, Japan, 1995: earthquake (5,500 dead)
                        Niger, 1995: meningitis epidemic (3,000 dead)
                        Chicago, USA, 1995: heatwave (739 dead)
                        North Korea, 1995-98: Famine and floods (3.5 million dead)
                        West Africa, 1996: meningitis outbreak (25,000 dead)
                        Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 1996: earthquake (??,000 dead)
                        Papua New Guinea, 1998: Tsunami (2,200 dead)
                        Yangtze Kiang, China, 1998: flooding (3,600 dead)
                        Central America, 1998: Hurricane Mitch and floods (12,000 dead)
                        Afghanistan, 1998: Earthquakes (10,000 dead)
                        Colombia, 1999: earthquake (1,185 dead)
                        Izmit, Turkey, 1999: earthquake (17,000 dead)
                        Taiwan, 1999: 7.6 earthquake (2,400 dead)
                        Orissa, India, 1999: Cyclone (7,600 dead)
                        Venezuela, 1999: Floods (20,000 dead)
                        Gujarat, India, 2001: earthquake (20,000 dead)
                        El Salvador, 2001: earthquake (850 dead)
                        Afghanistan, 2002: earthquake (2,500 dead)
                        Algeria, 2003: earthquake (2,266 dead)
                        Andhra Pradesh, India, 2003: Heat wave (1,300 dead)
                        France, Spain and Italy, 2003: Heat wave (50,000 dead)
                        Bam, Iran, 2003: earthquake (26,300 dead)
                        Al-Hoceima, Morocco, 2004: earthquake (571 dead)
                        Haiti and Dominican Republic, 2004: rains (2,400 dead)
                        Philippines, 2004: typhoon (1,000 dead)
                        China, 2004: floods (1,300 dead)
                        Southeast Asia, 2004: tsunamis caused by 9.0 earthquake (111,000 dead in Indonesia, 31,000 in Sri Lanka, 10,700 in India, 5,400 in Thailand, 68 in Malaysia, 82 in the Maldives, 300 in Myanmar and 150 in Somalia, including 1,500 Scandinavian tourists, and dozens of Germans, Italians, Dutch, etc)
                        Zarand, Iran, 2005: earthquake (500 dead)
                        Nias, Indonesia, 2005: 8.7 earthquake (1000 dead)
                        Mumbai, India, 2005: monsoon (1,000 dead)
                        China, 2005: floods (567 dead)
                        Louisiana and Mississippi, USA, 2005: hurricane (1,069 dead)
                        Niger, 2005: famine (10,000? dead)
                        ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
                        NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
                        343
                        CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
                        LT. John Ginley Engine 40
                        FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
                        FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
                        FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
                        FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
                        FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
                        FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
                        FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
                        FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
                        FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

                        Charleston 9
                        "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
                        *******************CLICK HERE*****************

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's a heck of a lot of dead people, Ray
                          September 11th - Never Forget

                          I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                          Sheri
                          IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                          Honorary Flatlander

                          RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Tue. Oct. 11 2005 9:30 AM ET
                            Nazdeen Muhammed from the northern Pakistani town of Balakot waits to be treated at the AYUB medical complex in the Pakistani town of Abbottabad.

                            Abid Zalzla, 3 days old, sleeps his father Mansur Ahmed's lap as the family is airlifted from Uri sector, India. (AP / Ajit Kumar)

                            A Pakistan Army doctor provides medical help at Chaklala Air Base in Rawalpindi, Pakistan on Tuesday. (AP / Anjum Naveed)

                            Residents walk through the rubble of destroyed houses on Tuesday at the northern Pakistani town of Muzzafarabad. (AP / Lefteris Pitarakis)

                            Anger mounts among quake survivors as toll rises
                            CTV.ca News Staff

                            Heavy rain and hail is delaying the arrival of much-needed humanitarian aid in the region devastated by the massive South Asia earthquake, as anger mounts among frantic survivors over the apparently slow response to the crisis.

                            In parts of northern Pakistan, India and the disputed region of Kashmir, the scene is one of sheer devastation in the aftermath of the 7.6-magnitude quake that struck Saturday morning.

                            Entire villages have been reduced to rubble, hundreds of thousands are left homeless, and landslides in mountainous areas have rendered roads impassable.

                            Bad weather compounded the misery, with heavy rain and hail forcing helicopters loaded with food and medicine to cancel or delay their flights.

                            As law and order break down among survivors desperate for food and water, looting is being reported in Pakistan.

                            "The people here are angry, they are disappointed in the response by their government so far," CTV's Matt McClure reported from Uri, in Indian-controlled Kashmir.

                            "The only sort of aid we are seeing here on the ground is from civilian groups distributing blankets and food," he reports.

                            "There are mad rushes when these aid trucks pull up. People are grabbing whatever they can and hoping and praying their government will show up and provide them some assistance soon."

                            While official death toll estimates range from 20,000 to 30,000, one army official told The Associated Press that between 35,000 and 40,000 are believed dead.

                            The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to disclose the estimate to journalists.

                            When the first significant deliveries of aid began arriving in Muzaffarabad, capital of Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, victims scuffled over badly needed food. About 10 trucks rumbled into the city, where 11,000 are believed to have died and 90 per cent of the city is thought to be destroyed.

                            Efforts to distribute aid turned chaotic as residents scrambled for handouts of cooking oil, sugar, rice, blankets and tents in their frantic bid to stay alive.

                            According to reports from correspondents on the scene, shopkeepers are guarding their stores around the clock and launching stones at would-be thieves as survivors scramble to loot food, tents and medicine.

                            With winter just a few weeks away, United Nations officials said 2.5 million people in the worst-hit areas near the mountainous Pakistan-India border will need shelter.

                            Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf said his government was doing its best to respond to the disaster.

                            "We are doing whatever is humanly possible," Musharraf said. "There should not be any blame game. We are trying to reach all those areas where people need our help."

                            Pakistan army spokesman Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan said a total of 30 helicopters, including eight U.S. military helicopters diverted from the war in Afghanistan, would be supplying food, water, medicine and other items to quake victims.

                            Two more German and four Afghan helicopters would arrive later Tuesday, he said.

                            Having set aside its often-bitter rivalry with its nuclear neighbour, India planned to send a planeload of food, tents and medicine.

                            The move carries immense political implications for the neighbours who have fought three wars since their partition and independence from British rule in 1947. Two of those wars have been over the Kashmir region.

                            On the Indian side, the toll rose Tuesday to more than 1,000.

                            Meanwhile, India's prime minister acknowledged Tuesday that many survivors in Indian-ruled Kashmir don't have enough tents and medicine.

                            Touring the devastated areas for the first time, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh assured thousands of victims that the government would help them restart their lives.

                            "I am aware of the shortage of tents and inadequate medical facilities. We will do our best to organize these facilities for you," Singh said.

                            He pledged an additional $111 million US in assistance on top of the $31.5 million already promised by his government for relief and rehabilitation in the Himalayan territory.

                            In other developments:

                            In Islamabad, search crews continued digging through the ruins of a 10-storey apartment building after pulling a woman and child to safety. Rescuers reporting hearing voices in the rubble, where at least two dozen people died.
                            In the northern town of Balakot, a specialist French team on Monday rescued at least five children buried in a collapsed school, using sniffer dogs and special cameras. At least 100 children are thought to have been inside when the temblor struck, bringing the huge concrete roof down on top of them.
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                            September 11th - Never Forget

                            I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                            Sheri
                            IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                            Honorary Flatlander

                            RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I heard on the radio that they rescued a 4 year old boy today.

                              I'm sure a big boost for the rescuers!
                              September 11th - Never Forget

                              I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                              Sheri
                              IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                              Honorary Flatlander

                              RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                              Comment

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