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  • #16
    CRACCCCCK!! KA-BOOM!!!!

    We had one HUMDINGER of a storm blow through here this afternoon. The sky was a really ugly green, but I didn't hear of any tornado sightings. The storm was tracking east, north of Calgary when it took a "sharp right turn" according to the weather guys, which caused all hell to break loose. Thunder, lightening, pouring rain, hail from pea to marble size DT, pea to grape to golf ball size in some areas, some flooding. Hit right at rush hour of course.

    Just talked to my dad in Jasper (small tourist town in the Heart of the Canadian Rockies - about 4 1/2 - 5 hrs northwest of Calgary), asked if they got hit too. Well did they ever!! First time EVER they've been booted off the golf course, and a lightening strike started a forest fire on Pyramid Bench. Think they got it out though, Dad said he saw the helo dropping H20 on it.

    This picture is my sister and 2 of my nieces with Pyramid Mountain in the background.
    Last edited by RspctFrmCalgary; 07-20-2009, 10:57 AM.
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

    Sheri
    IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
    Honorary Flatlander

    RAY WAS HERE FIRST

    Comment


    • #17
      Sheri, I can see why you people put up witht he winters in Canada. It's to look forward to summer. The picture is absolutly gorgeous.
      I didn't think I'd be saying this anytime soon, but we really could use a rain. Haven't seen much in a couple of weeks, although a few spots had 1 - 2 inches last week. Not us though. I'll do my part to cool it off. I should get the A/C running again in my house in the next day or two. That'll make the weather cool off for sure. Might not even have to turn it on after I get it going.
      80, it looks funny down here to see one field of corn 7 ft. tall and tassling and right next to it is a field of corn that's 8 inches tall. Almost looks like some of the beans are taller than the corn.
      Cap, send us the rain. It does look like we're in for a stormy night tonight. Hope it doesn't get too rough but as hot and humid as it is, anything might happen.
      Jack Boczek, Chief
      Ashley Community Fire Protection District

      FLATLANDERS FOREVER!

      Comment


      • #18
        Jack... Be careful what you wish for. I bad mouthed the greedy northeners yesterday and received 3" last night. Big storms in the area again tonight but have not been out to check the gage yet. They gave an alert for an unconfirmed funnel cloud in West Quincy and luckily that was the only sighting reported. Still sounded like Quincy area had lots of wind damage. Lots of reports of trees and wired down.
        Proudly serving as Vice-President of the Illinois Delegation of the IACOJ

        Comment


        • #19
          received 3" last night
          You are talking about rain, right?

          Les, let that be a lesson to ya. You ask, we deliver!

          Finally got a peaceful night last night. The weathermen say it's over for a little while. Let's hope so.

          Come on corn, GROW!!!
          Omnis Cedo Domus

          www.hinckleyfd.org

          Comment


          • #20
            I might keep asking for more. It rained 3 miles North of here yesterday afternoon and 2 miles South, but only a few drops at home. I cut grass all afternoon. Last night we got .4. No storms, no wind, just a nice shower. We could probably use that much more but I think its over for now. We've been right in the middle of everything again. Just hope that keeps up. Let you people up north keep all the bad weather. That's something we don't mind letting Chicago have.
            Jack Boczek, Chief
            Ashley Community Fire Protection District

            FLATLANDERS FOREVER!

            Comment


            • #21
              PC,

              You ain't kidding Rockford got hit hard.

              I live here.
              Here is a link to some pictures.
              The 3rd one down by Brian and Cindy Steele was submitted by my mom.

              That is their neighbors house.

              Click here: Email WTVO Your Storm Stories/Pictures

              Unfortunately I was in Green Bay when this all happened.


              Every time I go to that damn state.
              Proud to be IACOJ Illinois Chapter--Deemed "Crustworthy" Jan, 2003

              Comment


              • #22
                Mike, ya big nerd, the link didn't come through. Try it again.
                Omnis Cedo Domus

                www.hinckleyfd.org

                Comment


                • #23
                  www.wtvo.com


                  You may have to type it in.
                  Proud to be IACOJ Illinois Chapter--Deemed "Crustworthy" Jan, 2003

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I'll find some stories later about all the wild weather we've had in various parts of Canada for those that "didn't know we get tornados up North".

                    Ok, so this picture is ummmmm ok I had it figured out this morning how to explain this .... dammmmmmm alcohol!!!

                    OK the lake my sister and her kids were skating on in the last picture you can see Pyramid Mountain to the West. The direction they are facing on the lake is FACING Whistler Mountain.

                    "new pic here" point >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PYRAMID MOUNTAIN over here


                    (remember I said the Pyramid Bench runs parallel to the townsite?) so draw a line between Whistler Mtn and Pyramid Mtn. and that's where the townsite is. I asked my mom (I think, coulda been Dad) to run out to the back yard and take a pic facing North - northeast (for future reference Old Man Mtn) and South (for future reference ummm not knowing what it will show - Mt. Edith Cavell, Tekarra, Skyline) but it was "raining and lightening and thunder every hour". hahahah suckers.

                    Then you will have a complete 360 view of where I grew up.

                    Anyway, this is a pretty cool pic.

                    nooooooooooooooooo I haven't been drinking hehehe

                    Here's the blurb that went with the pic that I found in Jasper's weekly newspaper.

                    Special delivery Forest firefighters training to rappel from a helicopter captured the attention of motorists driving along Highway 16, July 11. The crew of four firefighters made several descents near the Park compound as part of their re-certification requirements. Their certification comes just in time for the lightning season.

                    I'm going to check with my sister too, I got a calendar for Christmas with family/Jasper pics, maybe she has them on disk.

                    Ohhhhhhhh should I be insulted that my pitiful plea for honorary Illinoisan / Illini status has been pretty much ignored??????? wahhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by RspctFrmCalgary; 07-16-2003, 09:52 PM.
                    September 11th - Never Forget

                    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                    Sheri
                    IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                    Honorary Flatlander

                    RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      As promised LONG POST WARNING and a little light reading for storm lovers.

                      First is recent news, and then some info and links about previous deadly tornados in Canada, specifically Edmonton July 31, 1987 and Pine Lake, July 14, 2000 and then some stuff specifically about Edmonton, Calgary and Alberta storms.

                      Damage being assessed after twisters hit Saskatchewan, Manitoba

                      WINNIPEG (CP) - Environment Canada officials travelled through parts of the Prairies on Tuesday to assess damage from severe storms that packed tornadoes and hail as big as baseballs.

                      Southern Manitoba bore the brunt of Monday's storm - roofs were damaged, trees were knocked down and power was disrupted - but no injuries were reported. "Right now we're looking at confirmed, or certainly very credible, reports of three tornadoes," said Environment Canada meteorologist Jay Anderson.

                      "One of them near Portage La Prairie. One of them near Winkler and the more serious one at Gretna."

                      Ed Friesen was overwhelmed after returning to his Gretna home and finding the storm had punched holes in his roof, torn off some siding and uprooted trees.

                      "I walked around two or three times trying to figure out what to do next," he said. "You see it on TV where whole communities are wiped out, but you never think it can happen to you."

                      Based on the damage, Anderson said the tornadoes were likely in the F-1 category - the second-weakest class, but still packing winds of up to 160 kilometres an hour.

                      Aside from roof damage, most buildings emerged unscathed.

                      "That's an interesting thing about tornadoes," said Anderson. "They

                      seem to do a huge amount of damage to trees, but relatively light damage to well-built structures. Of course, it depends on whether they hit the structures directly or whether they're off to the side."

                      The Manitoba government's Emergency Measures Organization was also surveying some of the damage Tuesday, but said it was not enough to warrant any emergency programs.

                      Manitoba Hydro crews worked into the night to restore power.

                      Some of the most notable damage was caused by hail measuring 10 centimetres in diameter, which smashed through car windows in Altona, about 60 kilometres south of Winnipeg.

                      In Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask., about 70 kilometres northeast of Regina, fallen trees and downed power lines littered streets, chimney pipes had been blown off roofs and large evergreens were bent and uprooted.

                      Extensive damage was also reported in nearby towns.

                      "The sound was just like they say - a train coming," recalled Brenda Helfrick of Fort San.

                      "It sounded like the furnace was exploding . . . It was just this swoosh kind of a vacuum. It's hard to describe."

                      Although there was little damage to Helfrick's lakefront home, a tree on her property broke off into the neighbour's window. There were so many leaves inside that home Helfrick said it looked like someone had thrown a tossed salad on the walls.

                      The Canadian Press, 2003

                      07/15/2003 13:57 EST


                      INFO ABOUT PINE LAKE, ALBERTA JULY 14, 2000

                      July 14th, 2000
                      F3 tornado rips through Alberta camping area killing 11 people.
                      (This tornado ranks 4th in Canada's all time worst tornados)

                      Quick Facts:

                      Time: 7pm, July 14th, 2000
                      Location: Green Acres trailer park, Pine Lake, Alberta
                      Wind speeds: 300km/hr
                      Width of funnel at ground: 1.5 km (about 1 mile) at max.
                      Time on ground: 30 mins
                      Fatalities: 11 killed, 132 hospitalized

                      http://users.rttinc.com/~carlclub/tornado/tornado.htm
                      Ham operators response and assistance - huge site


                      http://www.ontariostorms.com/2000/jul/14/



                      CANADA'S WORST TORNADOS
                      source: http://www.ontariostorms.com/special.html

                      Rank Province Town/City Date #Dead #Injured

                      1 Saskatchewan Regina June 3, 1912 28 hundreds
                      2 Alberta Edmonton July 31, 1987 27 300
                      3 Ontario Windsor June 17, 1946 17 hundreds
                      4 Alberta Pine Lake July 14th, 2000 11 132
                      5 Quebec Valleyfield Aug. 16, 1888 9 14
                      6 Ontario Windsor April 3, 1974 9 dozens
                      7 Ontario Barrie May 31, 1985 8 155
                      8 Ontario Sudbury Aug. 20, 1970 6 200
                      9 Quebec St. Rose June 14, 1892 6 26
                      10 Ontario St. Catharines (Merriton) Sep 26, 1898 5 dozens
                      11 New Brunswick Buctouche Aug. 6, 1879 5 10
                      12 Manitoba Portage la Prairie June 23, 1922 5 15

                      http://datalib.library.ualberta.ca/tornado/t87.html#Contents The Edmonton tornado - lots of info but a weeee little bit wordy

                      8. THUNDERSTORMS IN EDMONTON AND CALGARY


                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      In section 1, subsection c, data from Hage (1990) indicated that Edmonton, with 12 tornadoes between 1890 and 1989, was the hands-down leader over Calgary where only 3 tornadoes had struck during that century. Since 1989 Edmonton has had 3 more, Calgary none.

                      The number of times during the past 15 years that Calgary and Edmonton were struck by large hail, that is, at least walnut size and thus damaging to weathered shingles, was carefully estimated. This was accomplished by perusing the storm reports listed by the Insurance Bureau of Canada (1996) while comparing them with the detailed tabulations of hail events in the severe-summer-weather lists issued annually by the ALWC from 1982 to 1994 and, since then, by similar lists from the now separate Southern and Northern Alberta Environmental Services Centres located in Calgary and Edmonton. Since 1982 it was determined that Calgary had 17 storms with large hail while Edmonton had 14. However, during the summers of '91 through '96, Calgary has had 12 of their 17 storms while Edmonton has had only 6 of 14. The severe weather coordinator at the Southern Alberta Environmental Services Centre (Dudley, 1996) has reported that this situation may support suggestions by the insurance industry that Calgary is being struck much more frequently by damaging hail. A similar increase has not been experienced in Edmonton where visits by walnut sized or larger hail have averaged approximately 1 per year during both the 80's and 90's. Devastating hailstorms with tennis-ball-sized hailstones have struck both cities twice during recent decades; Calgary in '81 and '91 and Edmonton in '69 and '87 (Charlton et al., 1995).

                      Major hail swaths passing through Calgary during the period 1957-1973 were shown in maps contained in Climatic Summaries of Hailfall in Central Alberta (Wojtiw, 1975). During those 17 years, Calgary lay within the cloud seeding area of the Alberta Hail Project. The maps indicate that Calgary was struck by walnut sized hail on between 13 and 20 occasions, or roughly once per year. These events showed no trend during the 17 years. Edmonton was never within the jurisdiction of the Alberta Hail Project. Between 1974 and 1985, the final decade of the hail suppression project, Calgary also lay outside the project area and, unfortunately, the reported hail swaths could not be interpreted in terms of whether or not they dispersed large hail on Calgary or Edmonton. Finally, the '57-'73 hailstorm information, discussed above, gave further credence to the possibility that Calgary, with an average of two storms with large hail per year since 1991, is experiencing a remarkable run of severe hailstorms.

                      Recently, Charlton and Kachman (1997) estimated the life expectancies of asphalt shingles exposed to weathering and a normal mix of hailstorms for both Edmonton and Calgary. They determined that asphalt shingles will last an average of 14 years in Edmonton and 11 years in Calgary if they can resist fracturing by walnut sized hailstones until late in their life. Improved asphalt shingles which would resist fracturing by golfball sized hailstones after 15 years of weathering were found to have hypothetical average lifetimes of 27 years in Edmonton and 17 years in Calgary. These lifetimes were based upon official weather observations at the airports which, averaged over several decades, indicated that Edmonton airports averaged 2.0 hailfalls (pea size or larger) per year while Calgary Airport averaged 4.1 hailfalls per year. Unfortunately, the mix of hail size categories reported by farmers in central Alberta had to be used in the shingle lifetime estimates so the strong possibility that Calgary receives a much higher proportion of pea sized hail, because of its altitude, than does Edmonton could not be taken into account.

                      A Severe Thunderstorm Climatology for Alberta (Paruk and Blackwell, 1994) based on '82 through '91 reports by volunteer weather watchers and other members of the public was recently published by researchers at the Northern Alberta Environmental Services Centre. The objective of the research was to adjust the number of reports per county for population density to yield realistic provincial maps of various severe weather parameters. Direct comparisons of values for Calgary and Edmonton should not suffer from anomalies found in some sparsely monitored counties. For the ten year period, Edmonton had 2.3 severe thunderstorm events per year per 1000 km2 while Calgary had 1.6. Similarly, Edmonton had 0.8 hail events (walnut or larger) per 1000 km2 while Calgary had 0.7. Edmonton had 0.5 heavy rain events (30 mm in an hour) per year while Calgary had 0.4. Severe wind events associated with thunderstorms were 0.3 per year per 1000 km2 in both cities. Winter wind events associated with Chinooks in the foothills and cold frontal passages throughout the province were not under consideration. As expected, tornado sitings during the decade were much more frequent in Edmonton (0.8 per year per 1000 km2) than in Calgary (0.1 per year 1000 km2) but in both cities the tornadoes seldom did damage to more than a few trees or one or two buildings, the exception being the Edmonton tornado.

                      Finally, it is hoped that the severe hailstorms in Calgary during the 90's will become a meteorological aberration like the Edmonton tornado appears to have been, and if not, may Calgarians discover hail resistant roofing before the insurance companies modify their coverage to reduce the stupendous insured losses.


                      OK well you get the gist right? hehehe
                      September 11th - Never Forget

                      I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                      Sheri
                      IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                      Honorary Flatlander

                      RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Nasty

                        WOW!! did we get nailed lastnight. 80mph + winds trees and wires down all over,4 calls 1am-6am,1.5 in of rain in 10 min hail and no power for 20 hrs, what a nite. Hope everyone else is ok?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          It has been quite the stormy July. Everyone at work today got about 3 hours sleep. I usually sleep through storms, but last night it just kept on going and going... like that stupid bunny.
                          IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Sounds like you got what we had yesterday. The thunderstorms were moving east at 35km/hr going through Alberta.

                            Wild weather shakes up northern suburbs

                            Robin Summerfield
                            Calgary Herald

                            Monday, July 21, 2003

                            CREDIT: Vince Koch, for the Calgary Herald

                            A funnel cloud that descended on Temple in the city's northeast Sunday ripped apart trees and sent shingles and siding flying.

                            Wild weather -- including reports of a tornado, a strong windstorm and six-degree temperature drop in less than 30 minutes -- hit Calgary Sunday afternoon, sending emergency crews scrambling and city folk scanning the skies.

                            The wacky weather can be blamed on a thunderstorm that blew into the city at about 4:30 p.m. and swept through in about an hour.

                            The system came from the mountains and crossed the northern part of the city.

                            Winds did a 180-degree direction change, going from south to north within 30 minutes, with gusts clocked at 72 kilometres an hour.


                            Here's the link to the rest of the story.

                            http://www.canada.com/calgary/calgar...2-A7CE21DBAB8A

                            First the temp went up a couple of degrees to 30C (at some point or another it got to 32C (90F) 'cause that's what the official high yesterday was) and then dove to 23 in 1/2 hr, between 4-4:30pm. I heard on the news winds were 80MPH, so not sure about the 72km part. Of course, the airport is always a bit cooler than the rest of the city for some reason, and that's where the official temps are from.

                            Hope all you guys are ok. Stay safe through all this wild weather PLEASE!!
                            Last edited by RspctFrmCalgary; 07-21-2003, 11:37 PM.
                            September 11th - Never Forget

                            I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                            Sheri
                            IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                            Honorary Flatlander

                            RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Wild Weather? Where?

                              Little bit o' wind, little bit o' rain. Lotsa lightening. That's it for us. We've been lucky. It seems to be swinging around us all the time. That's fine with me.

                              Sunday night would've been quiet if the ******* dispatchers hadn't toned us out at 3am to tell us the severthunderstorm watch had expired and the tornado watch had been cancelled. Thanks. #^@%@$#^^!!!
                              Omnis Cedo Domus

                              www.hinckleyfd.org

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                now thats nice .................and hey you are catching up to me postwise too !!!!!!!! gonna make 700 soon you are !
                                IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
                                Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
                                ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
                                RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
                                LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
                                I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
                                "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
                                http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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