Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oxygen in POV

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oxygen in POV

    I'am a first responder, and I most of the time respond straight to the scene because i live on the the other end of town from the station. Anyway, I have a tool box in the back of my truck. I have no knowledge of storing oxygen. Can i put a portable bottle of oxygen in my toolbox without it harming me or my truck?lol I live in Louisiana where in the summer it gets to 105 degrees. Please help.. Thanks !!

  • #2
    I would not. If for some reason that tank has a leak and someone walks by the buildup of oxygen in the toolbox could cause a explosion.
    Last edited by d_holder86; 05-12-2011, 06:50 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by d_holder86 View Post
      I would not. If for some reason that tank has a leak and someone walks by the buildup of oxygen in the toolbox will cause a explosion.
      Uh, I don't think someone walking past the truck will make oxygen explode... That only happens in movies.

      Carrying O2 in a POV is very common and is no more or less dangerous than carrying it in a department owned SUV or car or ambulance. Don't make it more complicated than it needs to be. Put it in a bag made for it just like we do on the apparatus to protect the tank from rolling around and it holds the masks and stuff too.

      Putting it in the tool box will not be problem. It gets that hot in any other vehicle left out in the sun too. I used to have mine in a tool box for years.
      Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

      Comment


      • #4
        When you say First Responder, do you mean NREMT or State Certified Medical First Responder or do you mean it as in "I am a firefighter therefore I am one of the first to respond and commonly referred to as a "First Responder"."

        If you are a Certified Medical First Responder and you've never been taught the basics of storing and transporting medical oxygen then you probably need to ask for a refund on the first responder course. That just seems to me like one of the basic skills you should have been taught. If you "Have no knowledge of storing oxygen" then how do you even know it's stored safely on your rigs?

        If you are not a certified medical first responder, you might want to check with your department, your local ems and your state's laws. In my state unless you are a certified first responder acting under the auspices of the primary emergency medical organization in the state administering oxygen is a no-no.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by d_holder86 View Post
          I would not. If for some reason that tank has a leak and someone walks by the buildup of oxygen in the toolbox will cause a explosion.
          Oxygen by itself is non-flammable... It is, however an oxidizer (or should we say the oxidizer). If you were to light a match in an oxygen-rich atmosphere, the match would burn really fast, but there would be no explosion.

          Like NMFIRE says - stored properly, it's not a hazard, even if the vehicle gets hot (there's a relief mechanism for that). I'd worry more about that can of shaving creme....

          Failures of O2 cylinders in fires are extraordinary events.

          Agreeing with EGregory - oxygen is considered a drug/medication. It needs to be handled as such, even if you can go into an "oxygen bar" in Japan and get some nicely scented O2 for a small remittance....
          Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

          Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by EGregory View Post
            When you say First Responder, do you mean NREMT or State Certified Medical First Responder or do you mean it as in "I am a firefighter therefore I am one of the first to respond and commonly referred to as a "First Responder"."

            If you are a Certified Medical First Responder and you've never been taught the basics of storing and transporting medical oxygen then you probably need to ask for a refund on the first responder course. That just seems to me like one of the basic skills you should have been taught. If you "Have no knowledge of storing oxygen" then how do you even know it's stored safely on your rigs?

            If you are not a certified medical first responder, you might want to check with your department, your local ems and your state's laws. In my state unless you are a certified first responder acting under the auspices of the primary emergency medical organization in the state administering oxygen is a no-no.


            I'am a Certified Medical First Responder. I know some basic skills of storing oxygen, but i wanted an answer with all the info i needed to know. Even if i knew it already.
            You have to be an EMR (Emergency Medical Responder) to administer oxygen. EMR is the new term for Medical First Responder.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks everyone for all the great information!! I'am considering buying a oxygen setup for my truck.

              Comment


              • #8
                A bag such as this is what I would suggest:

                http://www.thefirestore.com/store/pr..._response_bag/
                Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And make sure you get a regulator for it. i dont know how many times ive been on calls and someone arrives before us with a o2 tank without a regulator.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EGregory View Post
                    When you say First Responder, do you mean NREMT or State Certified Medical First Responder or do you mean it as in "I am a firefighter therefore I am one of the first to respond and commonly referred to as a "First Responder"."

                    If you are a Certified Medical First Responder and you've never been taught the basics of storing and transporting medical oxygen then you probably need to ask for a refund on the first responder course. That just seems to me like one of the basic skills you should have been taught. If you "Have no knowledge of storing oxygen" then how do you even know it's stored safely on your rigs?

                    If you are not a certified medical first responder, you might want to check with your department, your local ems and your state's laws. In my state unless you are a certified first responder acting under the auspices of the primary emergency medical organization in the state administering oxygen is a no-no.
                    My CFR and EMTB classes never went over the specifics of storing oxygen in POVs.Guess I should ask for a refund

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      And I suppose you also have a prescription by your services medical director to carry such oxygen as well, correct? Oxygen IS a medication and it is prescribed, which is why you just can't go to the drug store and pick up a bottle of O2. This means you just can't arbitrarily tote around a bottle of O2 in your POV because you are a first responder, such a thing needs to be approved and signed off on.

                      My suggestion is unless you are absolutely sure you can carry O2 in your POV and you are carrying the medication prescription for it, I would suggest just forgetting about carrying O2 in your POV.
                      The thoughts and opinions posted here are mine and mine alone and do not reflect the thoughts and or views of city or dept affiliation.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jccrabby3084 View Post
                        And I suppose you also have a prescription by your services medical director to carry such oxygen as well, correct? Oxygen IS a medication and it is prescribed, which is why you just can't go to the drug store and pick up a bottle of O2. This means you just can't arbitrarily tote around a bottle of O2 in your POV because you are a first responder, such a thing needs to be approved and signed off on.

                        My suggestion is unless you are absolutely sure you can carry O2 in your POV and you are carrying the medication prescription for it, I would suggest just forgetting about carrying O2 in your POV.
                        Most places have this well taken care of and POV EMS kits are norm, not the exception or the one wacker. He's just asking how to best carry it safely. No need to get all crabby about it.
                        Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tree68 View Post
                          Oxygen by itself is non-flammable... It is, however an oxidizer (or should we say the oxidizer). If you were to light a match in an oxygen-rich atmosphere, the match would burn really fast, but there would be no explosion.

                          Like NMFIRE says - stored properly, it's not a hazard, even if the vehicle gets hot (there's a relief mechanism for that). I'd worry more about that can of shaving creme....

                          Failures of O2 cylinders in fires are extraordinary events.

                          Agreeing with EGregory - oxygen is considered a drug/medication. It needs to be handled as such, even if you can go into an "oxygen bar" in Japan and get some nicely scented O2 for a small remittance....

                          Oxygen bars are catching on here in the US also. The gift shop at Pikes Peak has an 02 station with scented O2 also!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jccrabby3084 View Post
                            And I suppose you also have a prescription by your services medical director to carry such oxygen as well, correct? Oxygen IS a medication and it is prescribed, which is why you just can't go to the drug store and pick up a bottle of O2. This means you just can't arbitrarily tote around a bottle of O2 in your POV because you are a first responder, such a thing needs to be approved and signed off on.

                            My suggestion is unless you are absolutely sure you can carry O2 in your POV and you are carrying the medication prescription for it, I would suggest just forgetting about carrying O2 in your POV.

                            Damn....

                            I carry 02 under standing orders from our medical director, I do NOT carry a prescription, nor have I ever been asked for such. Of course, I have only been in EMS since the days of caddilac ambulances so my experience may be limited.

                            And buying o2 is simple, without a prescription. Over the net there are hundreds of suppliers that will send you a complete kit as long as your credit card is good.

                            They guy is just asking for a little info...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jccrabby3084 View Post
                              And I suppose you also have a prescription by your services medical director to carry such oxygen as well, correct? Oxygen IS a medication and it is prescribed, which is why you just can't go to the drug store and pick up a bottle of O2. This means you just can't arbitrarily tote around a bottle of O2 in your POV because you are a first responder, such a thing needs to be approved and signed off on.

                              My suggestion is unless you are absolutely sure you can carry O2 in your POV and you are carrying the medication prescription for it, I would suggest just forgetting about carrying O2 in your POV.

                              Look, I was just asking for information on storing it. I didn't ask you to tell me if I can. I know the law. I know what I can and cannot do. Thanks and have a great day.

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X