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  • #16
    It is more like a "Emergency Medicine" guide, mostly deals with drugs commonly used/seen in an ER setting as compared to every drug out there
    Omnes domum redeunt

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    • #17
      I carry a pocket copy of the regional protocols. You almost need it anymore since we are carrying double the drugs we carried when I got my paramedic in 1984.

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      • #18
        I took a little index spiral book and titled it, "Marvin's Guide to Success"
        and put all the most common runs in our area. I also put the most popular medication names and why they're used, the most common diseases and illnesses, also wrote down the shortcuts to the hospital, and even what my attending paramedic likes to use and what not to use (nasal cannula, etc). I sell them for a couple bucks. All those EMS Field guides are great, but sometimes the book can only get you so far.
        VB Rescue Squad 14
        EMT-Basic

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        • #19
          I normally carry mine with me just in case I forget something (Happens to all of us lol). I've used it once or twice.

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          • #20
            Here are a few thoughts and suggestions:

            1. Most pre-printed pocket-guides are fairly generic. They may be more of a hinderance than a help.

            2. Most folks do not have an abundance of space to carry/store excess stuff in a convenient and effective manner.

            3. Most agencies have their SOPs/SOGs/MOPs and treatment protocols available either elcetronically and/or via online.

            4. Most folks know what they are supposed to do on runs, they just sometime need a memory-jogger or would like something easy to use for reference or review.

            My suggestions are as follows:

            1. Get a copy of whatever documents you are wanting to have as a pocket-guide reference and make your own based on your own organzation's procedures. Cut-and-paste them into Word, decrease the font size to where you can read them, go to Kinkos, laminate, and the have them bound in a manner to your liking. You may need to "clean up" whatever you cut-and-paste but you'll learn the topics intimately while you are reformating them and organizing them in a manner that makes sense to YOU.

            2. Many folks are utilizing laptops for their PCRs. We got our software provider to include our treatment protocols so you can review them in real time on a run if you need to by pressing one button. You "X" out or minimize that screen when you are done.

            3. If you are not computer saavy, do as suggested in a previous post and print the documents you want to have available as a reference, put them in vinyl protectors, and put everything a binder that locks well.

            Generic pocket guides are OK but if you are going to carry something, why not have something that is specifically for your organization? I made three of each - one for firefighting stuff, one for ARFF, and one for EMS. Be prepared for everyone else wanting a copy of your stuff once you make them. If it's all on the computer, email the info to them and let them organize their stuff to their liking.
            Last edited by dfwfirefighter; 01-14-2011, 01:32 PM.
            DFW



            "There's no such thing as a free lunch."

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            • #21
              Most of us at my department carry a field guide that is basically a shrunk down copy of our protocols. Like was mentioned before, it is great to pull out and take a look at while you are enroute to a call that you do not run on a regular basis.
              ------------------------------------
              These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
              ------------------------------------

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              • #22
                Every state has their own Protocols. Get them...learn them like it's going out of style...then get your Informed pocket guide. But remember it's only a GUIDE. Just a set of "standard" rule usually followed by most states. Remind yourself if you buy it your protocols WILL more than likely be slightly different & need to be attended to first.
                "Courage is the resistance to fear, the mastery of fear, not the lack of fear." Mark Twain
                "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." Uknown

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                • #23
                  They are very useful but only in between calls. You can only imagine what a patient would be thinking if you pulled out a "how to" guide and start flipping through the pages. You can certainly use them to gain some valuable information. For example I am only a basic but I have the ALS guide. Can I perform the technique's listed in there? No, but i can gain some knowledge not only for my self but to also assist paramedics in the equipment needed for the call etc etc. Be careful not to violate any of your local protocols or the departments SOP's

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