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  • Why Not Use Quik-Clot

    Just a quick question we were throwing around at dinner tonight. I know Quik-Clot is used heavily in the military, and seems to work very well. That being said, why haven't the vast majority of EMS systems adopted it's use?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by ATFDFF View Post
    Just a quick question we were throwing around at dinner tonight. I know Quik-Clot is used heavily in the military, and seems to work very well. That being said, why haven't the vast majority of EMS systems adopted it's use?

    Thanks.
    I"m curious as well...

    Wonder if it's a cost thing? Nah, not in our health system.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    • #3
      Its not too expensive, I've spent a lot more money on things that don't work. We keep it on a few of our bags as a last ditch, but I don't see it used much elsewhere in the area. A lot of medics are kinda supprised we even have it. I'm in the process of looking in to see if its even in protocal, but very good question.
      Matt G.
      Battalion Chief
      IACOJ-Member
      FTM-PTB

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      • #4
        I work for DOD and we can't use it. One of the stumbling blocks we've run into in Michigan was the reluctance of the manufacturers to actually say what's in their product. Products like Quik-Clot and the Rapid-Cool? burn gel are fantastic products. However, if your patient develops a reaction, the Docs need to know what they're potentially treating.

        My brother is a retired Army Doc working in a civilain hospital now. I'll shoot him an e-mail and see what he thinks. Expect a reply in about 2 weeks.

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        • #5
          Does it have a short shelf life?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rm1524 View Post
            Does it have a short shelf life?
            No, actually. According to the website, an unopened pack has a shelf life of 3 years.

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            • #7
              We just got quik-clot in our protocols here early this year. The same MD that said he would never let us have it, finally gave it to us. I'm not sure about his reasoning this time. To my knowledge noone under our med control has used it yet. Next time I run into the MD I'll ask him and let you guys know.
              Andy

              IACOJ

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              • #8
                Not sure on why a particular MD's reasoning may be to not adopt QuikClot, but here are some drawbacks:
                - Must be applied directly to the source of the bleeding (i.e. the torn vessel interior from a bullet or blade wound).
                - Used in large amounts to control heavy bleeding, there is the potential for significant heat production, thus causing thermal burns. Although, if they're bleeding that badly, would a burn make their chances for survival worse?
                - Since the original powder form was so fine, it blew around with the slightest breeze, often into eyes causing severe ocular burns. The newer version is applied in sponge form to stop that problem.

                I read somewhere that the active ingredient of QuikClot is some sort of a derivative of volcanic/lava rock.

                Perhaps the reason military medics can use it is since it IS a last ditch effort on the battlefield. Hopefully, in civilian EMS we have more resources readily available.

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                • #9
                  FYI, it's based on kaolinite (a kind of clay); the active ingredient in Kaopectate.

                  http://www.z-medica.com/getattachmen...of-Action.aspx
                  "Nemo Plus Voluptatis Quam Nos Habant"
                  sigpic
                  The Code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

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                  • #10
                    I think part of the problem why it is not used more is the slow creep of our governing agencies.

                    The DOT curiculum lays the ground work for what is "suggested" in your protocols. And what year was the curiculum last updated?

                    Then the state agencies set the next bar, writing "standard" protocols that are often used as the benchmark for the standard of care.

                    Then comes the medical director. Many services have outstanding medical directors that are at the top of their game. Many others have a medical director that just happened to be the only doctor in the county that didn't say no, doesn't know anything about EMS, and just signs of on those standard outdated state-protocols.

                    But even if you have a top-notch medical director, he/she has to face the prospects of lawsuits. Quik-Clot is a great product, but is it "standard of care" in the EMS field yet. It might save many lives, but that one person that files suit for some reason and wins a $$$ award because it was not standard-of-care could shut down an EMS service that barely stays in the black.

                    Of course this is my opinion only.
                    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." -- Benjamin Franklin

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MarcusKspn View Post
                      I think part of the problem why it is not used more is the slow creep of our governing agencies.

                      The DOT curiculum lays the ground work for what is "suggested" in your protocols. And what year was the curiculum last updated?

                      Then the state agencies set the next bar, writing "standard" protocols that are often used as the benchmark for the standard of care.

                      Then comes the medical director. Many services have outstanding medical directors that are at the top of their game. Many others have a medical director that just happened to be the only doctor in the county that didn't say no, doesn't know anything about EMS, and just signs of on those standard outdated state-protocols.

                      But even if you have a top-notch medical director, he/she has to face the prospects of lawsuits. Quik-Clot is a great product, but is it "standard of care" in the EMS field yet. It might save many lives, but that one person that files suit for some reason and wins a $$$ award because it was not standard-of-care could shut down an EMS service that barely stays in the black.

                      Of course this is my opinion only.
                      +1

                      And, I hear many rumors about the stuff. Some say it will badly burn your pt, others say the powder form can cause an embolism. A lot of people base their opnions off rumors.
                      FF/Paramedic

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                      • #12
                        I asked about quikclot when I first started and my Med. Director told me the stuff works great at stopping bleeding, but the reason we don't use it is that it's darn near impossible to remove the quikclot without pulling the clot underneath it with it. Which restarts the bleeding and places the patient back into a critical situation. Only this time the patient is in an ED, or if they are lucky an OR/Trauma lab. He told me that they have eliminated the thermal burns with the current generation.

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                        • #13
                          In our current protocol lists basics only have the use of the quick clot sponges. We arent allowed to use the dump in powder. Although the quick clot does work fairly well. I havent seen it used on a person, but i have seen it used on a horse.

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                          • #14
                            Just a question... Would dumping the powder on a torn blood vessel possibly send small clots around the cardio vascular system? I don't imagine that all the powder clots there at the site and some could travel up the vain. I don't know, just brainstorming.
                            ~Drew
                            Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
                            USAR TF Rescue Specialist

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                            • #15
                              That's one of the reasons why loose powder form fell out of favor and they make the treated gauze.

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