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  • Getting on a Rescue Company

    I'm in Recruit School and I'm focused on getting assigned to a Rescue Company, or at least a station that has one so I have a chance. Does anyone have experience with what Officers are looking for in a Recruit for this position?

    Thanks!
    Eh?

  • #2
    Experience.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CTJAKE View Post
      Experience.

      Usually lots of it.
      Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
      IAFF Local 2339
      K of C 4th Degree
      "LEATHER FOREVER"
      Member I.A.C.O.J.
      http://www.tfdfire.com/
      "Fir na tine"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by localva View Post
        I'm in Recruit School and I'm focused on getting assigned to a Rescue Company, or at least a station that has one so I have a chance. Does anyone have experience with what Officers are looking for in a Recruit for this position?

        Thanks!
        Time on the job and a fair amount of expereince...or at least thats what they formerly wanted in my dept anyway.

        It is best to relax and focus on learning the job first before thinking about Rescue. Learn the Engine and Ladder work before worrying about anything else...you have a long career ahead of you.

        FTM-PTB

        Comment


        • #5
          like the other guys said, experience is big. it also helps to show that you have a real interest in learning as much as you can, especially with things like technical rescue, stay in shape, ask a lot of questions, read a lot of books, get with the rescue guys and have them walk you through all the equipment on the truck and different scenarios they've been faced with and they should get the hint that you want to get on the truck....

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          • #6
            along with experience... get all the training you can get.


            I dont know about FFFRed and the FDNY, but you take someone with, maybe 10 years on and compare him to someone who might have, say like 6 or 7, but the guy with 6 or 7 has gotten all the training he could... say trench rescue, haz-mat, building collapse, confined space and such.... he might have a edge compared to the other guy.


            But, you have to get experience first. And until you have that.... you really shouldnt be focusing too much on getting on a rescue because without some experience, typically its a no brainer
            The Box. You opened it. We Came...

            "You'll take my life but I'll take your's too. You'll fire musket but I'll run you through. So when your waiting for the next attack, you'll better understand there's no turn back."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JHR1985 View Post
              along with experience... get all the training you can get.


              I dont know about FFFRed and the FDNY, but you take someone with, maybe 10 years on and compare him to someone who might have, say like 6 or 7, but the guy with 6 or 7 has gotten all the training he could... say trench rescue, haz-mat, building collapse, confined space and such.... he might have a edge compared to the other guy.


              But, you have to get experience first. And until you have that.... you really shouldnt be focusing too much on getting on a rescue because without some experience, typically its a no brainer
              Around here one transfers to a Rescue Co. and THEN gets the training(on OT I might add). I don't know of any proffesional depts that thinks each member should pay his own way for some training which obviously won't conform 100% to their departments operations or might not even apply at all.

              Worry about feeding your family and not spending your own dough on what the Dept should pick up.

              JMO.

              FTM-PTB

              Comment


              • #8
                Experience in the job is very important. Willingness to go that extra step to learn everything you can is also a good trait of a rescue company member.

                The one element that I haven't seen listed here is that experience outside the job in a trade usually is a big boost. Whether it is construction or some kind of mechanical ability or heavy equipment knowledge or whatever this has been a big benefit to the rescue guys I have known over the years.

                If you are in recruit school this is all just the beginning phase of your career. Learn the engine work, learn the truck work and depending where you are and how your FD works learn the EMS side too. When you get some years on and get your base of knowledge firmly established then revivist becoming a rescue company member.

                Good luck.

                FyredUp
                Crazy, but that's how it goes
                Millions of people living as foes
                Maybe it's not too late
                To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
                  Experience in the job is very important. Willingness to go that extra step to learn everything you can is also a good trait of a rescue company member.

                  The one element that I haven't seen listed here is that experience outside the job in a trade usually is a big boost. Whether it is construction or some kind of mechanical ability or heavy equipment knowledge or whatever this has been a big benefit to the rescue guys I have known over the years.

                  If you are in recruit school this is all just the beginning phase of your career. Learn the engine work, learn the truck work and depending where you are and how your FD works learn the EMS side too. When you get some years on and get your base of knowledge firmly established then revivist becoming a rescue company member.

                  Good luck.

                  FyredUp
                  Great point FyredUp. Trades of any kind, especially, Ironworkers, Carpenters, Crane riggers, Operating Engineers, even Plumbers, pipefitters and Millwrights all bring excellent hands-on mechanical apptitude to the job.

                  Glad to see someone else mention it. It seems like so many nowadays place all their eggs in one basket with liberal arts educated kids who have never seen the working end of a wrench.

                  FTM-PTB

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    FFFred...

                    I am a rural guy, born and raised in a rural area and in fact I still live in a small rural community. It is damn near a crime against humanity out here not to know how to build, fix, jury rig and make do with your hands and tools at your disposal.

                    I work on an urban fire department and it amazes me the city guys we get on the FD that basically have had no other real job experience and have absolutely zero mechanical aptitude. Same thing when I am teaching at the tech school. I ahve actually had to teach people how to swing an axe. Some of these young people have never had an axe or a sledgehammer in their hands. Heck out in the rural you have kids splitting wood and building and fixing stuff by 9 or 10 years old.

                    It seems obvious to me given the choice between a guy who has grown up around tools and building and fixing things and a guy who can't tell you what a wrench is, who would be a better rescue company candidate.

                    FyredUp
                    Crazy, but that's how it goes
                    Millions of people living as foes
                    Maybe it's not too late
                    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Also, just to clarify, experience doesn't necessarily translate into time in. A guy with fifteen years, might have less experience than a guy with five. How busy the companies you have been in can be important, over time in. 7,8, or 9 years in a busy company, is a lot better than 7,8, or 9 years in that company that catches two or three jobs a year.

                      Other than that, get to know everything about basic firefighting. That's what you'll be expected to know coming into a Rescue company. Ropes, Confined Space, Trench Rescue, all that comes after getting a good handle on how to be a firefighter. The Rescue can teach you the Rescue stuff, but they expect, nay demand, you be a good firefighter first.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you are able to go on your own, and take classes to better yourself, do it. Most dept's will reimburse you the cost of the class. They might not pay you overtime, as only a small amount will. Be proactive, learn THE job, become good at it, and find out what the requirements are in your department for the rescue. Never stop taking classes and trying to better yourself, no matter who has to pay. You will only short-change yourself.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CTJAKE View Post
                          If you are able to go on your own, and take classes to better yourself, do it. Most dept's will reimburse you the cost of the class. They might not pay you overtime, as only a small amount will. Be proactive, learn THE job, become good at it, and find out what the requirements are in your department for the rescue. Never stop taking classes and trying to better yourself, no matter who has to pay. You will only short-change yourself.
                          I have to disagree.

                          The only person you are really short changing is yourself your family and your brothers. If the department isn't paying for it, don't do it on your own. If everyone decided to worry about supporting their family and doing the right thing by the brothers, then the Dept would either have to pay you for the training or not have the Rescue Co. Is that simple. As opposed to general training for ones betterment, the topic at hand as I see it has to do with the suggestion from some that taking pre-requisite classes on ones own dime that are intended to help one get a transfer into a Rescue Co.

                          Imagine that guys who get into Rescue would get paid the proper amount of OT for training and selection into this unit wouldn't be based on who could afford to pay their own way through training classes.

                          Obviously I'm speaking in the context of a career Union dept...but then again where else does one have a Rescue company that one desires to transfer to. I don't understand taking classes for job at ones own expense that the job should be paying for.

                          If they want you to have them...then they should be paying for them. If they don't pay for them...then they aren't needed for you to transfer into that company.

                          FTM-PTB

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FFFRED View Post
                            I have to disagree.

                            The only person you are really short changing is yourself your family and your brothers. If the department isn't paying for it, don't do it on your own. If everyone decided to worry about supporting their family and doing the right thing by the brothers, then the Dept would either have to pay you for the training or not have the Rescue Co. Is that simple. As opposed to general training for ones betterment, the topic at hand as I see it has to do with the suggestion from some that taking pre-requisite classes on ones own dime that are intended to help one get a transfer into a Rescue Co.

                            Imagine that guys who get into Rescue would get paid the proper amount of OT for training and selection into this unit wouldn't be based on who could afford to pay their own way through training classes.

                            Obviously I'm speaking in the context of a career Union dept...but then again where else does one have a Rescue company that one desires to transfer to. I don't understand taking classes for job at ones own expense that the job should be paying for.

                            If they want you to have them...then they should be paying for them. If they don't pay for them...then they aren't needed for you to transfer into that company.

                            FTM-PTB
                            I agree, to a point. I think its fair to say that you should continue your education to learn as much as you can in whatever you can thats applicable to you and your department. I dont think you should wait for a trench collapse to learn about trench rescue. Most departments dont go on enough specialized calls to gain the experience that one needs. As far as the rescue, I dont think there is anything wrong in taking classes on your own to give you knowledge in a subject (rope, confined space, trench, etc..). I agree, the department should be providing it on their dime. And of coarse, you can wait and have them provide the training for you, which they should. I have taken classes at the academy and "in-house." Most of the training at the academy is superior due to the instructors, props, and resources.
                            This doesn't hold true for every department, but I would say the majority.

                            Do I think the dept. should pay me OT to take a class to better the dept. YES. Do I think the dept should pay me OT to write grants that saves them hundreds of thousands of dollars. YES. If I wait for them to pay me, two things will happen: I will never get paid because they will refuse to spend the money (not important to them) and 2. we wont get the training and equipment that we have gotten. It might not be ideal way, but I would bet thats how it is in the majority of the dept's.
                            Last edited by CTJAKE; 02-11-2007, 04:38 PM.

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                            • #15
                              If you’re learning a new skill, you should be paid for it. If you learn an advanced skill, you should be paid more. Absolutely nothing should be ‘given’ to a city, because they will give nothing back to you.
                              Trench, ropes, collapse, or any other specialized rescue work are all necessary to learn, but it should be learned on the city's time and dime. When is the last time the city 'gave' a fireman anything?

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