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What Changed in Your Life Since You Became a Volunteer FF?

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  • What Changed in Your Life Since You Became a Volunteer FF?

    Well, its been some 4 months since I joined your community as a volunteer FF. My life is changed forever. I love it. But I noticed some interesting changes so far. I am curious if you share any of these traits?

    1. I can't go to bed unless I have a pair of jeans and shirt laid out, car keys in pocket, socks and sneakers at the ready, and pager on, ready and charging.

    2. Check the pager again before retiring for the night in case its not on, ready and charging.

    3. Car backed into the driveway, NEVER to be parked head first again.

    4. Stopping at station on way home from work, just because there may be a task to accomplish. Or a call.

    5. When wife asks where to go out to eat, default to restaurant in our first due.

    6. Stress when wife leaves kids with me to do errands because we might get something and I will be "out of service".

    7. Sometimes listen to scanner to get the extra 4 seconds jump start at beginning of dispatch transmission before pager alerts.

    8. Worry when you have to do a # 2 that the moment you begin pager will sound.

    9. Check pager for proper operation during long periods of time between runs.

    10. Log on to firehouse.com forums while waiting for pager to sound.

    Did I miss anything? I mean, we're all in this together right? What am I missing?

  • #2
    Originally posted by 1080iAddict View Post
    What am I missing?
    If you aren't careful, the rest of your "life". Congrats on joining the fire service, but don't let it consume all of your time and thoughts. Remember your wife and kids still need you, your time and your full attention. Welcome to the Brotherhood! Best of luck to you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by SAFD46Truck View Post
      If you aren't careful, the rest of your "life". Congrats on joining the fire service, but don't let it consume all of your time and thoughts. Remember your wife and kids still need you, your time and your full attention. Welcome to the Brotherhood! Best of luck to you.
      Rich is correct...

      Your family comes first. There'sa story on the news page about some whackjob in Tennesee who was "going to call" with his wife and kids in the car driving 85 miles an hour and requesting his dispatcher to call the SP to call off the trooper who was behind him

      You can't make every call. Don't skip out on your kid's recital, birthday party or game....

      Unless you are self employed or independently wealthy, your employer may take umbrage at your requests to leave every time a tone drops.
      ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
      Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

      Comment


      • #4
        It's all good gentlemen. This was more of a fun spirited thread. Sure it will calm down but I am with you in every sense of your comments re work and family. Just small things I noticed so far in amusement.

        Comment


        • #5
          Well I thought it was precious.

          I have an ex-cousin in law whose a Captain in Spring Volunteer Fire Department. He joined after talking to me for a while. He'd always wanted to do it and I encouraged him because it's just so much fun. Called him a while back and told him I thought it was pretty cool to have a relative (even an ex) in the fire service. I think he thought I was nuts and maybe dangerous. He might be right.
          Logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead.

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=1080iAddict;761646]8. Worry when you have to do a # 2 that the moment you begin pager will sound.

            I always hate when that happens!

            Comment


            • #7
              See, you made three mistakes I can see...

              1. You didn't start when you were 18

              2. You got married

              3. You had kids..

              Okay so the last two were just a joke, or were they......anyhow..welcome, enjoy, learn..and most importantly don't get dead.
              'Adversus incendia excubias nocturnas vigilesque commentus est"

              www.vententersearch.com

              Comment


              • #8
                well i do understand exactly what you say and the 1st year was just like that.
                but i almost lost the most important thing to me, my soon to be wife.
                although some do apply still, i make sure to spend time with her

                as for other things, I always place helping others high on my list, and i drive more carefully then before
                Josh Ball
                FF/EMT - Zoneton Fire Protection District
                PSO II - Louisville International Airport
                Deputy - Bullitt County Sheriff's Office

                Comment


                • #9
                  That's funny. I used to do most of those listed and still do a few of them. I understand the humor too. However my rule, and the rule of the department is first is family, second is full time job, then third is the FD. If you follow that, you will be fine.

                  Now, the things I do or don't do what experience has taught me......

                  1. Lay out clothes at night before bed. ALWAYS take the time to wear socks!
                  2. Listen to the pager completely before moving. It's amazing what information I missed while scrambling to find my keys, put on shoes, etc.
                  3. If you take your gear with you like I do, always bring it inside to be warm.
                  4. Slow down. The few seconds you save by going balls to the walls isn't worth you being out of breath and all wound up when you need to be calm, cool, and collected.
                  5. NEVER just stumble through something. If you don't understand something or have questions, please ask before you kill or injure yourself or others.
                  6. Realize there is always someone in need, always emergencies, always fires. I can only make the ones I am available for. I don't have to save the world everyday. An emergency for them does not mean it's an emergency for me.
                  7. Realize that you did not cause the incident, whoever is involved is better now that you and your dept. responded regardless of who survives and who doesn't.
                  8. No one lives forever. Death is going to happen, sometimes it happens sooner for some. People die and it is not my fault. That is just the nature of the beast.
                  9. Take "alone time." You need to take advantage of time off WITHOUT a pager.
                  10. Never talk about the last call on the current call. The walls have ears.
                  11. Never, never, never ever drive department vehicles onto a frozen lake at anytime for any reason, no matter what is going on!!!
                  12. A good firefighter/officer never brags about how good they are. If you have to remind yourself how awesome you are, then it's time slap yourself back to reality.
                  13. The day you think you know everything is the day you need to retire because you are dangerous. Training is a constant thing. Arrogance can get you and others killed.
                  14. A good officer/instructor is always training their replacement. (think about that one!)
                  15. You truly are your brothers keeper. Always watch your back and your brothers back to be safe. No building is worth a human life.
                  16. Never have any regrets. Find a balance of personal time, family time, and fire department time.


                  Just passing on some lessons I learned the hard way.
                  Stay safe.

                  Good luck
                  Jason Knecht
                  Firefighter/EMT
                  Township Fire Dept., Inc.
                  Eau Claire, WI

                  IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
                  http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
                  EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    11. Never, never, never ever drive department vehicles onto a frozen lake at anytime for any reason, no matter what is going on!!!
                    Sounds like there might be a good story in that one.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by randsc View Post
                      Sounds like there might be a good story in that one.
                      My thoughts exactly!!!!


                      Dickey....... do you have a story to tell us...?
                      ------------------------------------
                      These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
                      ------------------------------------

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'd like to hear that story as well!

                        My sleep schedule is off since joining the dept. That's my biggest change!
                        Lieutenant/EMT-B

                        VSFFA Member

                        "I'm a CCEMT-B."

                        "Remember, if the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off."

                        "A lack of effort will always lead to failure."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 1080iAddict View Post

                          1. I can't go to bed unless I have a pair of jeans and shirt laid out, car keys in pocket, socks and sneakers at the ready, and pager on, ready and charging.

                          3. Car backed into the driveway, NEVER to be parked head first again.

                          6. Stress when wife leaves kids with me to do errands because we might get something and I will be "out of service".

                          10. Log on to firehouse.com forums while waiting for pager to sound.

                          1. I sleep in my bunker gear..........Not really, but I have a dedicated set of clothes in the top of the closet for "out of the blue late night calls"

                          3. I drive the engine home and leave my vehicle at the station......again not really, but I seldom back the truck in to driveway, I didn't see where it saved a whole lot of time for me

                          6. I used to stress a little over this one, then I realized if my daughter is with me, I don't have to worry about responding to a page and her being in the wrecked car I am responding to......

                          10. I could live with a hardwired brain into Firehouse.com.......great support, ideas, and comments from fellow emergency personnel, and great educational threads and articles for an eager learner like me! (Do i geat a free year for that?)
                          Last edited by SWLAFireDawg; 01-24-2007, 06:26 PM. Reason: Clarification of #6

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 1080iAddict View Post
                            Well, its been some 4 months since I joined your community as a volunteer FF. My life is changed forever. I love it. But I noticed some interesting changes so far. I am curious if you share any of these traits?

                            1. I can't go to bed unless I have a pair of jeans and shirt laid out, car keys in pocket, socks and sneakers at the ready, and pager on, ready and charging.

                            2. Check the pager again before retiring for the night in case its not on, ready and charging.

                            3. Car backed into the driveway, NEVER to be parked head first again.

                            4. Stopping at station on way home from work, just because there may be a task to accomplish. Or a call.

                            5. When wife asks where to go out to eat, default to restaurant in our first due.

                            6. Stress when wife leaves kids with me to do errands because we might get something and I will be "out of service".

                            7. Sometimes listen to scanner to get the extra 4 seconds jump start at beginning of dispatch transmission before pager alerts.

                            8. Worry when you have to do a # 2 that the moment you begin pager will sound.

                            9. Check pager for proper operation during long periods of time between runs.

                            10. Log on to firehouse.com forums while waiting for pager to sound.

                            Did I miss anything? I mean, we're all in this together right? What am I missing?
                            Been spying on me, huh?

                            Very funny stuff. I also like Jason's post...some very true and well thought out advice in there. I might just print it out and hang it in my locker.

                            BTW...I too would like to hear the reason behind #11.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sounds like you're really getting into this Glad you're enjoying your start in the fire service, I hope you will always maintain your enthusiasm. But remember, you can't be available for every single call. Don't fret so much about always being available. Go to that restaurant that's outside your first due area and don't worry about it. Park your car like you normally do. DO know where you put your car keys .

                              And like Dickey said, SLOW DOWN! Biggest mistake I see from rookies is dashing around at 100 mph, not able to control the adrenaline or themselves. That's how people get hurt. Driving too fast, throwing equipment around, fumbling around putting on SCBA, whatever....getting in a big panicking hurry will at best cause you to foul up and at worst get someone hurt.

                              A local instructor put it this way.... SLOW = SMOOTH and SMOOTH = FAST. I think that's good advice. Take a little time to do each step methodically and the speed will come naturally. Take a second to take a deep breath and calm down before you get on the highway...undue speed will only gain a few seconds but could cost you in the long run....
                              Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
                              Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
                              Paincourtville, LA

                              "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
                              — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

                              Comment

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