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  • I have to air an aggravation

    I am sorry I am posting this but I hope everyone here will knwo why I am aggravated.
    i was watching Dallad SWAT (i was extremely bored) the other day. One of the guys was talking about the tools they use. He pulled out a Halligan bar. he then proceeded to explain the history of the tool. This is the part that aggaravtes me. he said it was designed by a police officer for police use. The next day I was discussing with an officer friend of mine the show and she said that it was true. I was so P---sed off. i am tired of law enforsement taking credit for what the fire service built or created or solved or whatever. I had to go pull the history and definition of the tool and gave it to her. I am not knocking the law enforcement community. They risk their lives just like we do but....come on!!!

    Whew now that is off my chest does anyone else get frustrated or am I all alone?

    Just in case some people do not know I am adding the below.

    Halligan bar

    The adze and pick end of a typical Halligan bar.A Halligan bar (also called a Halligan tool or simply Halligan, and affectionately known as a Hooligan tool) is a special tool commonly used in the fire and rescue service. It was designed by and named after Hugh Halligan, a First Deputy Fire Chief in the New York City Fire Department, in 1948, based upon the well known Kelley tool. The Halligan is a multipurpose tool for prying, twisting, punching, or striking. It consists of a claw (or fork), a blade (wedge or adze), and a tapered pick, which is especially useful in quickly forcing open many types of locked doors. Either the adze end or fork end of the tool can be used to break through the latch of a swinging door by forcing the tool between the door and doorjamb and prying the two apart, striking it with another Halligan, a Denver tool or a flat-head axe. Along with a K-tool and the adze end a lock cylinder can easily be pulled. There are many other uses of the Halligan tool, including vehicle rescue and opening of walls.

    The Halligan is available in a number of lengths, and of various materials, including titanium or stainless steel, and may be found with replaceable head, handle and fork, and with carrying straps or rings.


    A married Halligan bar and flat-head axe.A Halligan bar and a flathead axe can be joined together (and partially interlocked, head-to-toe) to form what is known as a married set, or set of irons — a particularly useful combination.

    They are standard equipment for fire departments from North America to New Zealand, making them possibly the most widely-deployed tool by a single manufacturer in fire fighting today.

  • #2
    Oddly, while googling for Halligan Bar, one finds a Halligan Bar (i.e., a drinking place) in Chicago. The logo is two crossed flathead axes (but oddly enough no halligan tool).

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Cappy05 View Post
      I am sorry I am posting this but I hope everyone here will knwo why I am aggravated.
      i was watching Dallad SWAT (i was extremely bored) the other day. One of the guys was talking about the tools they use. He pulled out a Halligan bar. he then proceeded to explain the history of the tool. This is the part that aggaravtes me. he said it was designed by a police officer for police use. The next day I was discussing with an officer friend of mine the show and she said that it was true. I was so P---sed off. i am tired of law enforsement taking credit for what the fire service built or created or solved or whatever. I had to go pull the history and definition of the tool and gave it to her. I am not knocking the law enforcement community. They risk their lives just like we do but....come on!!!

      Whew now that is off my chest does anyone else get frustrated or am I all alone?

      Just in case some people do not know I am adding the below.

      Halligan bar

      The adze and pick end of a typical Halligan bar.A Halligan bar (also called a Halligan tool or simply Halligan, and affectionately known as a Hooligan tool) is a special tool commonly used in the fire and rescue service. It was designed by and named after Hugh Halligan, a First Deputy Fire Chief in the New York City Fire Department, in 1948, based upon the well known Kelley tool. The Halligan is a multipurpose tool for prying, twisting, punching, or striking. It consists of a claw (or fork), a blade (wedge or adze), and a tapered pick, which is especially useful in quickly forcing open many types of locked doors. Either the adze end or fork end of the tool can be used to break through the latch of a swinging door by forcing the tool between the door and doorjamb and prying the two apart, striking it with another Halligan, a Denver tool or a flat-head axe. Along with a K-tool and the adze end a lock cylinder can easily be pulled. There are many other uses of the Halligan tool, including vehicle rescue and opening of walls.

      The Halligan is available in a number of lengths, and of various materials, including titanium or stainless steel, and may be found with replaceable head, handle and fork, and with carrying straps or rings.


      A married Halligan bar and flat-head axe.A Halligan bar and a flathead axe can be joined together (and partially interlocked, head-to-toe) to form what is known as a married set, or set of irons — a particularly useful combination.

      They are standard equipment for fire departments from North America to New Zealand, making them possibly the most widely-deployed tool by a single manufacturer in fire fighting today.
      All the cops did was paint it black!




      Kevin
      Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
      IAFF Local 2339
      K of C 4th Degree
      "LEATHER FOREVER"
      Member I.A.C.O.J.
      http://www.tfdfire.com/
      "Fir na tine"

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FlyingRon View Post
        Oddly, while googling for Halligan Bar, one finds a Halligan Bar (i.e., a drinking place) in Chicago. The logo is two crossed flathead axes (but oddly enough no halligan tool).
        A good spot.
        I am a complacent liability to the fire service

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Cappy05 View Post
          I am sorry I am posting this but I hope everyone here will knwo why I am aggravated.
          i was watching Dallad SWAT (i was extremely bored) the other day. One of the guys was talking about the tools they use. He pulled out a Halligan bar. he then proceeded to explain the history of the tool. This is the part that aggaravtes me. he said it was designed by a police officer for police use. The next day I was discussing with an officer friend of mine the show and she said that it was true. I was so P---sed off. i am tired of law enforsement taking credit for what the fire service built or created or solved or whatever. I had to go pull the history and definition of the tool and gave it to her. I am not knocking the law enforcement community. They risk their lives just like we do but....come on!!!

          Whew now that is off my chest does anyone else get frustrated or am I all alone?

          Just in case some people do not know I am adding the below.

          Halligan bar

          The adze and pick end of a typical Halligan bar.A Halligan bar (also called a Halligan tool or simply Halligan, and affectionately known as a Hooligan tool) is a special tool commonly used in the fire and rescue service. It was designed by and named after Hugh Halligan, a First Deputy Fire Chief in the New York City Fire Department, in 1948, based upon the well known Kelley tool. The Halligan is a multipurpose tool for prying, twisting, punching, or striking. It consists of a claw (or fork), a blade (wedge or adze), and a tapered pick, which is especially useful in quickly forcing open many types of locked doors. Either the adze end or fork end of the tool can be used to break through the latch of a swinging door by forcing the tool between the door and doorjamb and prying the two apart, striking it with another Halligan, a Denver tool or a flat-head axe. Along with a K-tool and the adze end a lock cylinder can easily be pulled. There are many other uses of the Halligan tool, including vehicle rescue and opening of walls.

          The Halligan is available in a number of lengths, and of various materials, including titanium or stainless steel, and may be found with replaceable head, handle and fork, and with carrying straps or rings.


          A married Halligan bar and flat-head axe.A Halligan bar and a flathead axe can be joined together (and partially interlocked, head-to-toe) to form what is known as a married set, or set of irons — a particularly useful combination.

          They are standard equipment for fire departments from North America to New Zealand, making them possibly the most widely-deployed tool by a single manufacturer in fire fighting today.
          The PD wants to take credit for inventing the Halligan because....


          Being known for inventing the parking sapce in front of the donut shop just isn't good enough!
          ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
          Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

          Comment


          • #6
            Parking in front of the Donut Shop?

            Time to call these guys!
            Attached Files
            Be safe y'all!
            IACOJ Animal Control
            Ladder 8
            "Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati"

            Comment


            • #7
              And if you have an original pro-bar halligan you can join the two fork ends together to make a pry bar with even more leverage! And to get them apart just drop them on a concrete floor and watch the magic :-) That Champ taught me on a roof drill years ago.

              Comment


              • #8
                Dude- I wouldnt get too ****ed about it. Just tell the cops it was a fire service invention and remember the important rule of the road- Dont give Firemen tickets.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Theirs are made of aluminum, or tin, or COPPER!!
                  IAFF

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by snowball View Post
                    Theirs are made of aluminum, or tin, or COPPER!!

                    Ahh yes. The famous "COPPER" bar.
                    Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
                    IAFF Local 2339
                    K of C 4th Degree
                    "LEATHER FOREVER"
                    Member I.A.C.O.J.
                    http://www.tfdfire.com/
                    "Fir na tine"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Remember:

                      "What do cops and firemen have in common?"

                      "They both want to be firemen."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well if that's the worst your day can get, then be grateful
                        Luke

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lutan1 View Post
                          Well if that's the worst your day can get, then be grateful
                          Exactly....
                          "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ladder8 View Post
                            Parking in front of the Donut Shop?

                            Time to call these guys!
                            A local radio station used to have a call in game called"Cop or no Cop".The 10 caller would get to gues if a given donut shop in town had a cop in it when the station called to ask"Is there a cop in your store,right now?"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by doughesson View Post
                              A local radio station used to have a call in game called"Cop or no Cop".The 10 caller would get to gues if a given donut shop in town had a cop in it when the station called to ask"Is there a cop in your store,right now?"
                              Some moron robbed the Diplomat hotel in DC one night which was right accross the street from an Amy Joy donut shop which never seemed to have fewer than six police cars in it. He got apprehended before the coffee got cold.

                              Comment

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