Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Boarded Up: What Would You Do?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • needlejockey
    replied
    He's actually from up my neck of the woods.


    BTW my woods are in the north west part of the state.

    Leave a comment:


  • randsc
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Damn ... it's amazing how some folks think that because things are a certain way there it must be the same way here.

    I really can't beleive we are having this discussion.

    1. We have very few vacant structures. The ones we have are obviously vacant. We do not have issues with homeless living in vacant structures. We do not have issues with drug addicts using them, or folks setting fire to them. We do not have issues with teens using them. The sheriffs department knows which buildings are vacant and are very aggressive and very successful in keeping them clear. Neighbors in these areas are very aware of what is happening and can tell us about any activity. Unexpected folks in vacant structures is simply not an issue in our district.

    2. We are a rural community. Though we cover about 120 miles, our members pass these structures daily. We notice cars, activity, etc etc. If a house is occupied, though it might be in bad shape, we will know it. Unless it's off the beaten track, we see what's happening and make mental notes.

    3. Given the rural nature of our district, when a fire occurs in a vacant structure, it is generally well envolved upon arrival due to the delayed alarm and extended response times (as most vacants exist in the edges of the district due to high property values in our core .. vacants simply do not exist near our one staffed station where we have the fastest response times). We rarely have a vacant where the structure is sound enough to operate interior for any reason due to fire conditions. We rarely have a vacant where the fire is contained to one or two rooms on arrival. If by chance we have a small fire, we will go interior but bottom line, it just doesn't happen very often. Our SOPs are built around this reality. My opinions are built around the fact that in my experiences I have worked very few vacants where the structure was safe to go interior on, and the majority of time command opted for exterior ops only.

    4. Being a generally rural area, exposure concerns are rarely an issue. We do not need to aggressivly atatck a fire in a vacant to protect exposures. Those
    problems rarely exist.

    n my previous district, most of the vacants we operated at were boarded up summer camps. where we knew that nobody was there as they were seasonal w/ no heat or insulation, or vacant commercial structures.
    Since in a previous life you lived in southern Vermont, you may be aware of a fire that took place in southwestern New Hampshire a couple of years back. At Highland Lake, specifically, or possibly Stoddard Lake, where a closed summer cottage went up. It was November or December, and there was no reason to believe that the structure was occupied, since it was closed with security shutters and not outfitted for year-round use. But funny thing. You how fires don't start themselves, generally speaking? Well this one was set by some kids who had broken in looking for a place to party. Fortunately, at least a couple of them were still more or less conscious when the fire got out of hand, and they all made it out. What if they had all had just a little bit more to drink, and were passed out?

    Occupancies are vacant when they have been cleared by the fire department, and not before.

    Leave a comment:


  • SPFDRum
    replied
    n my previous district, most of the vacants we operated at were boarded up summer camps. where we knew that nobody was there as they were seasonal w/ no heat or insulation, or vacant commercial structures.
    How did the fire start then? You are assuming all your buildings are always vacant, but you fail to answer this key question. It's not PFM.
    Nobody here is advocating entering a structure with no viable rescue scenario.
    I can only imagine how involved buildings are where you are at, especially if you are stopping for green lights.

    Leave a comment:


  • LaFireEducator
    replied
    Damn ... it's amazing how some folks think that because things are a certain way there it must be the same way here.

    I really can't beleive we are having this discussion.

    1. We have very few vacant structures. The ones we have are obviously vacant. We do not have issues with homeless living in vacant structures. We do not have issues with drug addicts using them, or folks setting fire to them. We do not have issues with teens using them. The sheriffs department knows which buildings are vacant and are very aggressive and very successful in keeping them clear. Neighbors in these areas are very aware of what is happening and can tell us about any activity. Unexpected folks in vacant structures is simply not an issue in our district.

    2. We are a rural community. Though we cover about 120 miles, our members pass these structures daily. We notice cars, activity, etc etc. If a house is occupied, though it might be in bad shape, we will know it. Unless it's off the beaten track, we see what's happening and make mental notes.

    3. Given the rural nature of our district, when a fire occurs in a vacant structure, it is generally well envolved upon arrival due to the delayed alarm and extended response times (as most vacants exist in the edges of the district due to high property values in our core .. vacants simply do not exist near our one staffed station where we have the fastest response times). We rarely have a vacant where the structure is sound enough to operate interior for any reason due to fire conditions. We rarely have a vacant where the fire is contained to one or two rooms on arrival. If by chance we have a small fire, we will go interior but bottom line, it just doesn't happen very often. Our SOPs are built around this reality. My opinions are built around the fact that in my experiences I have worked very few vacants where the structure was safe to go interior on, and the majority of time command opted for exterior ops only.

    4. Being a generally rural area, exposure concerns are rarely an issue. We do not need to aggressivly atatck a fire in a vacant to protect exposures. Those
    problems rarely exist.

    n my previous district, most of the vacants we operated at were boarded up summer camps. where we knew that nobody was there as they were seasonal w/ no heat or insulation, or vacant commercial structures.
    Last edited by LaFireEducator; 12-17-2006, 08:57 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steeda83
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Wow .. dying to save a vacant building. I'm sure my widow and children will be proud that I was killed saving a building that was sitting there falling down and rotting away or was sure to be bulldozed in the next 4 years to build a parking lot.

    C'mon guys ... you really can't be serious?
    i hope your family would be proud..you're telling us that the families of the 6 worcester firefighters arent proud of the ultimate sacrafice that was made by them, why dont you call them up and tell them?

    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    In 27 years of being a firefighter, I have never responded to a call on any of the departments I have been on where we found or rescued anyone in a vacant structure. None of the departments I have served on has ever had a fatality in a vacant structure.
    if anyone died in a vacant structure it wouldn't be vacant now would it? how do you know said building is vacant? either by searching it and discovering that it's vacant or waiting til it's burned down and finding a body either way this so called building was never vacant, guess thats a chance your willing to take

    if this building is "vacant/abandoned" what would cause the fire? since most vacant/abandoned buildings tend to have all utilities shut off to them

    but none of this matters since we stop at all intersections letting the fire burn to the point where any said victims would be bodies anyways

    i guess in the case of your fire department you should give up lights/sirens and attack lines and switch to ford focuses with deck guns
    Last edited by Steeda83; 12-17-2006, 07:23 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jg2700
    replied
    vacant house

    thats why when your out on building inspection or drill its always good to stop and check this building out.than notify the surrounding copanies and battalion of its condition.and yes even if apears vacant it could be occupied.we will get her opened up and see what we got and take it from there. jg

    Leave a comment:


  • needlejockey
    replied
    Originally posted by SPFDRum View Post
    Well I have never pulled anyone out of a vacant building either-hence the word vacant.
    The reason I know they are vacant is as a firefighter on a truck, it is my duty to search these buildings. If we don't find anyone, then it is truely vacant.
    But being here in Minnesota, not Louisiana, and only having about 15 years experiance, I have not yet developed the clairvoyant ability that lafireeducator must have. It must be a heck of a gift to just pull up to a building and just know its vacant from the safety of the curb. Until then, I will continue to do what is expected of me, including searches in so called "vacant" buildings. We will also extinguish fires in these same buildings. Because I am sure they people in the exposures that aren't so vacant, would appreciate me not burning down their places too.
    Actually they know it's empty because they preplanned the house 2 months ago and there was no one there at that time, therefore it must still be empty. Oh yeah and all utilities had been cut then too, so this fire is a product of pure spontaneous combustion.

    Leave a comment:


  • SPFDRum
    replied
    In 27 years of being a firefighter, I have never responded to a call on any of the departments I have been on where we found or rescued anyone in a vacant structure.
    Well I have never pulled anyone out of a vacant building either-hence the word vacant.
    The reason I know they are vacant is as a firefighter on a truck, it is my duty to search these buildings. If we don't find anyone, then it is truely vacant.
    But being here in Minnesota, not Louisiana, and only having about 15 years experiance, I have not yet developed the clairvoyant ability that lafireeducator must have. It must be a heck of a gift to just pull up to a building and just know its vacant from the safety of the curb. Until then, I will continue to do what is expected of me, including searches in so called "vacant" buildings. We will also extinguish fires in these same buildings. Because I am sure they people in the exposures that aren't so vacant, would appreciate me not burning down their places too.

    Leave a comment:


  • needlejockey
    replied
    Originally posted by johnny46 View Post
    ...inverted free-lancer...
    Sounds like a painful medical problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnny46
    replied
    LA,
    You is in the wrong pro-fession. Your caution is beyond the call of shirking; you are an inverted free-lancer and neither is a good thing to be.

    Leave a comment:


  • SSTONER
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Wow .. dying to save a vacant building. I'm sure my widow and children will be proud that I was killed saving a building that was sitting there falling down and rotting away or was sure to be bulldozed in the next 4 years to build a parking lot.

    C'mon guys ... you really can't be serious?
    What would they say if they read in the paper someone was in the structure and died? After all 4 years is a ways off.....

    Note: The departments I have been on average maybe 1 vacant building fire a year. It's simply not a pressing issue.
    Love the disclaimers.....just pushing up your post count?
    Last edited by SSTONER; 12-17-2006, 05:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TurdFergeson
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    In 27 years of being a firefighter, I have never responded to a call on any of the departments I have been on where we found or rescued anyone in a vacant structure. None of the departments I have served on has ever had a fatality in a vacant structure. It simply has not been a problem in the areas in which I have served.

    Note: The departments I have been on average maybe 1 vacant building fire a year. It's simply not a pressing issue.
    My department has never lost anybody in a highrise fire. Though we have many occupied highrises, we hardly have any fire in them. So we removed the highrise packs from the engines, since these types of incidents obviously aren't pressing issues .

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Originally posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Of course there are people in vacants. Where do your bums, junkies, and homeless sleep?
    C'mon Brother, you know there are none of them in his little corner of the world!

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Originally posted by jasper45 View Post
    You mean like blowing green lights?

    LMAO...Yes! But that'd probably be the least of his worries!

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Originally posted by jasper45 View Post
    You mean like blowing green lights?

    Oops...Double post.
    Last edited by fireman4949; 12-16-2006, 06:09 PM.

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X