Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Boarded Up: What Would You Do?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Rocket Science

    Open it up where the door is supposed to be. If there is a fire you are going to have to open it there anyway. My last concern is damaging the property.
    IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

    Comment


    • #17
      One more thing. If you have light smoke coming out of the eaves, check the amount coming out the chimney. If it is puffing out of the stack or the eaves, I would be a bit more cautious knocking down the door....But it still has to be done. And get the roof opened up.
      IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

      Comment


      • #18
        Open it up. Initiate primary search and (possibly) fast attack.
        Logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by WestTac1
          Here's a photo of a house that I took yesterday while in West Springfield, MA.

          According to a bystander, this house has been like this for months, and there's possibly squatters in it who gain access through a small basement window opening.

          Now, you recieve a report of light smoke coming from the eaves of this house, and it's midnight. How would you handle this?
          Start ripping the boards off and enter the structure, locate, confine, extinguish fire...while venting and searching for life.

          FTM-PTB

          Comment


          • #20
            I say make a quick search and then destroy as much as possible to find "hidden fire" so that they will have to demolish the whole thing and then you will never have to worry about it again. Someone from Houston wanna chime in on what happens when these type of structures are not torn down?

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by MIKEYLIKESIT
              Open it up where the door is supposed to be. If there is a fire you are going to have to open it there anyway. My last concern is damaging the property.
              Well said, screw the property damage and open it up. Once you get that first piece off, the others aren't going to be hard. You could even make one huge trench cut down each side.

              Comment


              • #22
                I'd do a 360 first with a TIC and then go to cutting. If it was boarded up to begin with, the building is a pretty one. Still won't be after we're done with it.
                NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
                IACOJ Attack

                Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

                Comment


                • #23
                  In the interest of peace and harmony during the holidays, I will refrain from posting an opinion on this one.
                  Train to fight the fires you fight.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    You are allowed, it's not a 3/4 house.
                    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
                    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Since you know it's there now why not find out what condition the inside is in and locate the best place to remove plywood to make entry now?

                      Why wait for the smoke coming out the eaves when it's so much more pleasant to pre-plan a building when it isn't on fire...
                      "Nemo Plus Voluptatis Quam Nos Habant"
                      sigpic
                      The Code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        So, you are going to put FF's at risk for "a vacant house"? I'm not saying you don't have to open it up and find the fire, but this should be one situation where you place more emphasis on your FF's safety than anything else.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Yes, I will put myself and my FF's at a "risk" for this possibly vacant house. It's what we do. It's what we are supposed to do. We take calculated risks all the time. There is a difference between being a firefighter and a trained bystander.
                          "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I was on another thread, This building has been like this for almost two years. If the outside is unfinished most likely the inside is totally gutted. I wouldnt be surprised to open it up and see floors missing and walls completely stripped. Wishful thinking about going in, surrond and drown as it comes down!!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by tradenfa
                              So, you are going to put FF's at risk for "a vacant house"? I'm not saying you don't have to open it up and find the fire, but this should be one situation where you place more emphasis on your FF's safety than anything else.

                              If it is a vacant house, did mice with matches start the fire?
                              Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by truckmonkey42
                                I say make a quick search and then destroy as much as possible to find "hidden fire" so that they will have to demolish the whole thing and then you will never have to worry about it again. Someone from Houston wanna chime in on what happens when these type of structures are not torn down?

                                1. Abandoned does not mean vacant.
                                2. Boards do not mean no one lives there.
                                3. No utilities does not mean no one lives there.
                                4. Spontaneous combustion is rare.
                                5. Surround and drown is not an option simply because the house looks abandoned or uncared for. There must be more solid reasons: Risk vs. benefit. If the house is solidly built, regardlesss of occupancy, you should make as aggressive an attack as possible.

                                This house doesn't resemble the kind of structure on Brandon and Bellfort. From the outside, it looks to be one piece. The collapse area on the Brandon fire was an addition. It's more than being boarded up; it has to be dangerous.
                                Logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead.

                                Comment

                                300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                                Collapse

                                Upper 300x250

                                Collapse

                                Taboola

                                Collapse

                                Leader

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X