Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wearing two hoods

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wearing two hoods

    I have long believed in the need to wear a hood. Where my concern lies is in the limitaions created by the hood. The full protection provided by turnout gear is limited by its two weakest components: the hood and the gloves. I have never used my ears as a thermometer because, the last time I checked, the only way to calibrate them to accuratly detect a certain temperature is to burn them and back down ten degrees or so. Since I don't use "nature's thermometer" (my ears), I have never been concerned with covering them with a hood. I am, however, concerned that the level of protection provided by my hood is significantly less than what is provided to my torso and legs by a coat and trousers. I other words, I can operate longer in a hot environment if my ears are better protected. I took to wearing two hoods about eight years ago and have found this solution to be satisfactory. I am certain there are better methods (i.e. Reed hoods, not going itno a fire, working for the police department, etc.) but with the budget and equipment access for the departments I have run with, they are not always attainable. i have labored to find a published study on this practice to no avail. I am fishing for comments on the matter or maybe a path to find a study in it. I'll open the floor for discussion.

  • #2
    This may get interesting................ Someone pass the popcorn
    ******=================
    ******================
    ******=================
    ******================
    =======================
    =======================
    =======================

    ------GOD BLESS AMERICA ! ------

    Comment


    • #3
      Isn't that why there's flaps on your helmet?

      Comment


      • #4
        I got the beer
        IACOJ
        FTM-PTB

        Comment


        • #5
          To each his own. I dont use a hood. I do use my flaps.
          IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

          Comment


          • #6
            I love drama...........pass the Jr. Mints.

            Jason Knecht
            Firefighter/EMT
            Township Fire Dept., Inc.
            Eau Claire, WI

            IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
            http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
            EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

            Comment


            • #7
              "Who's gonna turn down a Junior Mint? It's chocolate, it's peppermint...it's delicious........It's very refreshing!"

              CK

              Comment


              • #8
                Personally, I prefer a York Peppermint Patty, but in a pinch a Jr. Mint will feed the need.

                Maybe we should take a poll ... York Peppermint Patties vs. Junior Mints ?
                Train to fight the fires you fight.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Put me down for the one hood and York peppermint patties... where I get the cool sensation of knowing when to get out that wearing two hoods just cannot give you!
                  ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
                  Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would like to thank the person who started this thread. I needed a good laugh! Put me down for a few peppermint patties!! This should get fun!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm with Capt. Gonz on both accounts. Just to make it interesting, I will admit to a single occurence where I did where 'dual hoods'.

                      About 10-12 years ago, I would occasionally assist in classes taught at the Mississippi State Fire Academy. The burn building there consisted of propane fed fires inside a building that consisted of a lot of concrete, alot of metal deflection plates where fire would have directly impinged on said concrete, and alot of props (tables, couches, tables, cabinets, etc.) all also made out of metal.

                      For certain classes, temperatures inside this building were such that in certain places, standing water on the floor would boil.

                      Anyhow, with the high temperatures and so much metal and concrete in the building, an exhorborant amount of steam was created nearly everytime a student would open the nozzle. So much in fact, that there was literally no where to hide - at least not while trying to stay on top of the students.

                      Taking that beating run, after run, after run eventually got old and the instructor standing there in 2 hoods suddenly looked like Albert Einstein behind his air mask.

                      I will say today, that it sent the wrong message, especially to any recruits who may have been aware of what was occuring.

                      To the guy that started this thread: I do find it a little odd that you fully acknowledge that a single hood limits the amount of heat you are able to feel and discuss all of the drabacks that come along with that and you decided 8 years ago to counter all of those nagatives by wearing another one!!

                      Stranger than fiction.
                      RK
                      cell #901-494-9437

                      Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

                      "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


                      Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm sorry to be the one to totaly disagree, but you guts are nuts! JR. Mints all the way! And some Good&Plentys. MMM I'll get back to ya in a while on what I would like to drink!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well as one of the few Reed Hood wearers on this site, I’m sure you will all have a stroke when I say that a lot of us wear a sock hood under or our Reed Hoods. So as you can guess you get little or no heat at all. So why do we do this. Simple. God gave me a brain to realize there is more then one way to tell how hot it is besides burning my head up. All you have to do is be smart enough to change your tactics and what you think you know about being in a fire. There are plenty of body parts besides your ears to tell you how hot it is.
                          "DON'T GO IN THERE!!! DON'T YOU KNOW THERE IS A FIRE IN THERE!!!!"

                          "YOU'RE KILLING ME ROOK"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ok, now on a serious note ....

                            I am a beleiver in hoods. It's my belief that it is an essential part of the PPE package. That being said, I don't beleive in 2 hoods for one simple reason. With todays PPE esemble, the only place left to feel the heat is the head. Statistics indicate that more firefighters are being injured and killed in high-heat or flashover situations than ever. The reason is simple.. today's gear has allowed firefighters to go in much deeper than before, and quite honestly, in many situations, firefighters are going to deep, and as a result, are being exposed to and/or trapped in high-heat situations. Wearing one hood gives your head the protection it needs while operating interior, but also gives you some sense of the heat being faced. This gives you to information you need to decide when it's time to leave. IMO, wearing 2 hoods is simply deadening the one place we have left to feel the heat, and sets up the firefighter to be placed in a dangerous situation high-heat situation.

                            Glad to see that the York's seem to be winning out.
                            Train to fight the fires you fight.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hfd838
                              God gave me a brain to realize there is more then one way to tell how hot it is besides burning my head up. All you have to do is be smart enough to change your tactics and what you think you know about being in a fire. There are plenty of body parts besides your ears to tell you how hot it is.
                              What ways?
                              Which body parts (uncovered)?

                              Not stirring it up, I'm truly curious.

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X