Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

News: Aircraft crashes into NYC bldg

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    October 12th, As of 0025 hrs EDT...wire stories

    By COLLEEN LONG
    Associated Press Writer
    NEW YORK (AP) - The two pilots took off from a suburban airport
    for a journey above the sights of Manhattan. They looped around the
    Statue of Liberty and Wall Street, turned north past the Brooklyn
    Bridge and the Empire State Building.
    Just moments after passing above the 59th Street Bridge, the
    single-engine plane owned by New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle
    disappeared from the radar. And just about 20 minutes after
    takeoff, the plane slammed into a luxury condominium tower above
    Manhattan's tony Upper East Side - a fiery and deadly finish to a
    once-routine flight.
    Lidle, a veteran pitcher and rookie pilot, was killed along with
    his flight instructor after the crash that scattered burning metal
    on the sidewalks below while creating momentary Sept. 11
    flashbacks. The cause of the crash, reminiscent of the 1979 death
    of Yankees star Thurman Munson in another plane wreck, remained
    unknown.
    "A sightseeing trip," said Mayor Michael Bloomberg at a news
    conference.
    Two residents of the building barely escaped with their lives
    from an adjoining apartment after the plane exploded on contact,
    sending thick black smoke above the city skyline as a four-alarm
    fire raged high above 72nd Street.
    "This is a terrible and shocking tragedy that has stunned the
    entire Yankees organization," Yankees owner George Steinbrenner
    said in a statement. He offered his condolences to Lidle's wife and
    son.
    Bloomberg said a flight instructor and a student pilot with 75
    hours of experience were aboard and killed. The pair had circled
    the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor before heading uptown.
    Both bodies were found on the street below, and the plane's engine
    was found in one of the apartments turned into a four-alarm inferno
    by the crash, Bloomberg said.
    A federal official, speaking on condition of anonymity, had said
    that authorities had a report that the plane sent a distress call
    to the FAA before the crash.
    But National Transportation Safety Board member Debbie Hersman
    said at a late-night news conference that, "we've asked the FAA
    and they have reviewed some aircraft-control tapes. At this point
    they have no indication that there was a mayday call."
    Hersman said debris was scattered everywhere at the crash scene,
    including aircraft parts and headsets on the ground. The propeller
    separated from engine. Investigators also obtained the pilot's log
    book.
    The Cirrus SR20 was manufactured in 2002 and purchased earlier
    this year, Hersman said. The small aircraft has four seats and is
    equipped with a parachute designed to let it float to earth in case
    of a mishap. The parachute apparently did not engage after the
    crash.
    Lidle's passport was found on the street, according to a federal
    official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the
    investigation is ongoing.
    More than a dozen firefighters police officers were taken to New
    York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center with minor
    injuries.
    On Sunday, the day after the Yankees were eliminated from the
    playoffs, Lidle cleaned out his locker at Yankee Stadium and talked
    about his interest in flying. He explained to reporters the process
    of getting a pilot's license, and said he intended to fly back to
    California in several days and planned to make a few stops.
    Lidle, 34, a nine-year major league veteran with a wife and a
    6-year-old boy, came to the Yankees from the Philadelphia Phillies
    in a late-season trade. The journeyman pitched for seven teams
    during a career in compiling an 82-78 lifetime record.
    "No matter what's going on in your life, when you get up in
    that plane, everything's gone," Lidle told a Comcast SportsNet
    interviewer while flying his plane in April.
    Large crowds gathered at the crash scene, with many people in
    tears and others trying to reach loved ones by cell phone. Rain
    started pouring at the scene at around 4 p.m., and people gazed up
    at the smoke and fire as they covered their heads with plastic
    bags; earlier, parts of the plane fell to the ground.
    "I just saw something come across the sky and crash into that
    building," said Young May Cha, 23, a medical student who was
    walking along 72nd Street. "There was fire, debris ... The
    explosion was very small."
    Cha said it appeared the plane was "flying erratically" before
    it slammed into The Belaire Condo.
    "I was worried the building would explode, so I got out of
    there fast," said Lori Claymont, who fled the adjoining building
    in sweat pants.
    The plane slammed into apartments that were 30 and 31 flights
    above the street, but the floors are numbered at 40 and 41, and go
    up to 50, even though the building is technically about 40 stories
    high. "People number the buildings so they can feel like they live
    at a higher floor," said Fire Commissioner Nick Scoppetta, who
    compared it to eliminating the 13th floor in a building.
    Mystery writer Carol Higgins Clark, daughter of author Mary
    Higgins Clark, lives on the 38th floor of the building and was
    coming home in a cab when she saw the smoke.
    "Thank goodness I wasn't at my apartment writing at the time,"
    she said. She described the building's residents as a mix of
    actors, doctors, lawyers and writers, and people with second homes.
    The crash struck fear in a city devastated by the attacks of
    Sept. 11 five years ago. Witnesses said sirens echoed across the
    east side of Manhattan as emergency workers rushed to the scene.
    The crash triggered a loud bang. Broken glass and debris was strewn
    around the neighborhood.
    Fighter planes were scrambled over several cities across the
    country in the aftermath of the crash, despite the quick assurances
    that it was nothing more than an accident.
    Richard Drutman, a professional photographer who lives on the
    building's 11th floor, said he was speaking on the telephone when
    he felt the building shake.
    "There was a huge explosion. I looked out my window, and saw
    what appeared to be pieces of wings, on fire, falling from the
    sky," said Drutman, who quickly exited the building with his
    girlfriend.
    The address of the building is 524 E. 72nd Street - built in the
    late 1980s between York Avenue and FDR Drive. The Belaire Condo has
    183 apartments.
    ---
    Associated Press Writers Ronald Blum, Beth Fouhy, Adam Goldman,
    Richard Pyle and Pat Milton contributed to this report.

    (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    Leave a comment:


  • STFDQuint3
    replied
    they are saying there was a possible fuel problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by nmfire
    No, that isn't why. It is because I have a clue about aviation so I'm not just talking out my *** like those people. They were scud-running and flying into instrument conditions under visual flight rules. They were below legal and common sense altitudes because of this. They lost control or got disoriented or whatever and as result, they impacted an obstacle. This obstacle was nowhere near where they should have been flying. They were both trained in great detail why a day like to today in NYC was not a VFR sight-seeing day and why you don't scud-run it around tall objects.

    There is nobody else to blame here. They were not on an IFR flight plan, they were not under anyone else's direction but their own. As a result of their negligence, they could have killed another hundred people. Bottom line, the pilot in command screwed up really bad the moment he walked out onto the apron to get in the plane.
    They were flying in an authorized VFR flight corridor, and since they were in class B airspace, they would be required to have a transponder with Mode C veil and NY TRACON would have them under radar surveillance.

    Have you considered that they may have been doing some IFR flight training with Cory Lidle "under the hood"? The aircraft did issue a mayday, possibly for a flight control malfunction?

    Leave a comment:


  • USAFSSGT
    replied
    Anyone have a word on the 11 injured F.F.'s? I hope they are okay, godspeed to them and their familys.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nine3Probie
    replied
    ..........................
    Last edited by Nine3Probie; 07-28-2013, 05:47 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nmfire
    replied
    No, that isn't why. It is because I have a clue about aviation so I'm not just talking out my *** like those people. They were scud-running and flying into instrument conditions under visual flight rules. They were below legal and common sense altitudes because of this. They lost control or got disoriented or whatever and as result, they impacted an obstacle. This obstacle was nowhere near where they should have been flying. They were both trained in great detail why a day like to today in NYC was not a VFR sight-seeing day and why you don't scud-run it around tall objects.

    There is nobody else to blame here. They were not on an IFR flight plan, they were not under anyone else's direction but their own. As a result of their negligence, they could have killed another hundred people. Bottom line, the pilot in command screwed up really bad the moment he walked out onto the apron to get in the plane.

    Leave a comment:


  • STFDQuint3
    replied
    Originally posted by nmfire
    . They were both extremely stupid and acting wrecklessly negligent to for their own safety and the safety of those on the ground.

    were you in that plane with them? I don't think so. How do you know that they were acting with negligence? is this information from eye witnesses that say they were doing "acrobatics", the same witnesses that also said it took the FDNY 15+ minutes to arrive? So we can automatically throw that claim out the window, but not others?

    there just is not enough information to place sole blame on the pilots, lets wait to see what unfolds, then we can rant.

    Leave a comment:


  • emtcsmith
    replied
    Glad to hear everyone from the FDNY made it out alright. If we were all wondering what the new EMS gear looked like, it was on plenty of the videos from the day. By chance did anyone record the bravest radio transmissions from this job?

    Leave a comment:


  • NYSmokey
    replied
    Great job by the FDNY. You guys did NYC proud AGAIN. Wishing a speedy recovery to the injured brothers.

    Leave a comment:


  • SPFDRum
    replied
    Wow, a tragedy for sure, but damn. You guys from FDNY rock on your skills and ability to deal with that type of incident.

    Leave a comment:


  • FFwayne88
    replied
    hmm, maybe the Yankee pitcher had enough after DETROITTTT, whooped them in the playoffs?

    Leave a comment:


  • RspctFrmCalgary
    replied
    Originally posted by E229Lt
    Today was the 99th annual FDNY Memorial Service. You can imagine 8,000+ FFs hearing about this while they were all in Manhattan today.

    Great job by the on-duty brothers.
    First, I hope none of the injured firefighters are seriously hurt, and that all have a speedy recovery.

    Second, WOW ... 99th annual!!! You sure don't hear THAT very often.

    Third .... NO, I can't imagine the feelings New Yorkers likely experienced while this was happening, especially those 8,000+ firefighters. Heart-stopping, I'm sure.

    Two of the ladies I work with heard about it when they went to pick up lunch for our "Pizza Day" at work, and I just got home so haven't yet seen the news or read anything about it except for the posts on here.

    Leave a comment:


  • E229Lt
    replied
    Today was the 99th annual FDNY Memorial Service. You can imagine 8,000+ FFs hearing about this while they were all in Manhattan today.

    Great job by the on-duty brothers.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by nmfire
    Two licensed pilots, one of which is an instructor, flying one of the most advanced small aircraft ever created, out scud-running around the biggest city in the country in poor weather conditions and neither thought there was a problem with this? And it ended just like almost every other "inadvertant continued VFR flight into IFR conditions" incident has... with a bunch of dead people and small burning pieces of aircraft all over the place. 127 seconds, that is all it takes. I'm sorry, I can find very little sympathy for either of the pilots in that airplance. They were both extremely stupid and acting wrecklessly negligent to for their own safety and the safety of those on the ground.
    Don't you understand!!!??? It's a conspiracy! The Government did it!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • nmfire
    replied
    Two licensed pilots, one of which is an instructor, flying one of the most advanced small aircraft ever created, out scud-running around the biggest city in the country in poor weather conditions and neither thought there was a problem with this? And it ended just like almost every other "inadvertant continued VFR flight into IFR conditions" incident has... with a bunch of dead people and small burning pieces of aircraft all over the place. 127 seconds, that is all it takes. I'm sorry, I can find very little sympathy for either of the pilots in that airplance. They were both extremely stupid and acting wrecklessly negligent to for their own safety and the safety of those on the ground.

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X