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  • nyckftbl
    replied
    Manhattan, N. Y. 10/11/06 @ 14:45 hrs.
    Upper East Side

    Box 1031
    address: 524 East 72nd. St.
    between: York Ave. & the F. D. R. Drive

    1031 @ 14:43
    Engs. 44, 39, 8, 23* 21*
    T. Lad. 13, Lad. 2
    Batt. 9 s/c
    Rescue Co. #1*
    Squad Co. #18*
    Tac Support Unit #1*
    * 5 Engs. / 2 Tks. / Rescue & Sqd. & Tac.
    for numerous reports of a plane into a bldg. w / fire.

    @ 14:45
    Ladder 25 w/ Rescue Collapse #1 assigned
    Batt. 8 assigned
    Rescue Battalion assigned

    10 - 75 - 1031 @ 14:47
    Ladder 43 is designated as the "FAST" Truck
    Division 3

    10 - 77 - 1031 @ 14:48
    T. Lad. 35
    Eng. 53 C. F. R. D.
    Batt. 12
    Batt. 11 "Safety Officer"
    Fieldcom 1

    10 - 76 - 1031 @ 14:50
    Eng. 55 " Lobby Control Co. "
    Eng. 3 w / High Rise Unit #1
    Batt. 6

    2nd Alarm:
    2 - 2 - 10 - 76 - 1031 @ 14:51
    Engs. 65, 74, 91, 16
    Lad. 4, T. Lad. 15 act. T. Lad. 7
    Eng. 9 w / Satellite 1
    Rescue Co. #2 assigned @ 14:53
    Batt. 6 " Resource Unit Leader "
    Division 6
    Safety Battalion now assigned @ 14:53
    Mask Service Unit #1

    @ 14:57
    ( 1 ) 10 - 45 Code 1 confermed

    @ 14:59
    Haz. Mat. Unit #1 & Haz. Mat. Battalion assigned

    @ 15:07
    ( 1 ) additional Battalion Chief s/c for "Staging Manager"
    Batt. 49 s/c

    3rd. Alarm:
    3 - 3 - 1031 @ 15:09
    Engs. 35, 58, 54, 5
    Lad. 3, T. Lad. 12

    @ 15:10
    Fire located on the 40th. & 41st. floors. Fire has been knocked down
    on the 40th. floor. Still have heavy fire out ( 2 ) windows on the 41st.
    floor. At this time, we have ( 1 ) 10 - 45 Code 1. Fire is Doubtful.

    Fire Building:
    50 Story Class 1 204 x 240 O/M/D

    @ 15:18
    Special Call ( 1 ) additional Truck. Ladder 24 s/c

    @ 15:21
    Special Call ( 2 ) additional Battalion Chief's
    Batt. 28 & Batt. 7 are s/c

    @ 15:25
    All visible fire has been knocked down on floors 40 & 41.
    Checking for extensions and searches are continuing.
    Still Doubtful.

    4th. Alarm:
    4 - 4 - 1031 @ 15:31
    Engs. 307, 316, 76, 34
    Lad. 16, T. Lad. 21

    @ 15:32
    Probably Will Hold

    @ 15:35
    Special Call ( 1 ) additional Battalion Chief
    Batt. 10 s/c

    @ 15:40
    Marine Co. #6 is assigned searching the East River area.

    @ 15:43
    The 2nd. 10 - 45 Code 1 is reported. Total of ( 2 )

    @ 15:47
    Special Call ( 2 ) additional Battalion Chief's Batt. 54 & 16 s/c

    @ 15:57
    All visible fire has been extinguished.
    Primary searches are negative thru out.
    Fire remains at Probably Will Hold.

    @ 16:34
    Fire is UnderControl.

    ( job duration: 1 hr. & 51 mins. )

    Leave a comment:


  • nyckftbl
    replied
    44 was first due. I believe 39 engine was second due, however, 16 truck (should have been first due) missed the job because they were relocated up north because there was a 5th alarm in the Bronx earlier in the morning. All of the 1st alarm companies did an outstanding job and made a great push.


    In the end it does not seem to be that big of an incident, just a spectacular one for the news and with a b-list celeb.
    Speaking of B-List celebrities, Alec Baldwin was seen on the news trying to get past the PD fire line..... http://news.yahoo.com/photo/061011/p...JoBHNlYwNtdnBo

    Leave a comment:


  • allineedisu
    replied
    Another great job by the FDNY!! All fires are serious. As they get higher in buidlings they are more so.

    I am glad that no more than those were injured on this.


    E-2-2-9-Loo - who was first in there? Thinking maybe the 4-4 Engine??

    Leave a comment:


  • E229Lt
    replied
    ...............

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisTheMenace
    replied
    In the end it does not seem to be that big of an incident, just a spectacular one for the news and with a b-list celeb. A job well done by FDNY to keep it a relatively small incident.

    My observation/question about the incident is in regards to the makeup of the aircraft itself. Was there any additional problems/concerns with extinguishing the aircraft as it was a composite rather than a traditional aluminum airframe? I saw a photo of a tailwing continueing to burn in the street, something that would not happen with an aluminum wing.

    Leave a comment:


  • E229Lt
    replied
    Originally posted by ChiefSquirrel
    Bloomberg touts the 'unified command' as a complete success with FDNY and NYPD all playing nicely together. What about it FDNY brothers....is that an accurate assessment?
    I'm not trying to stir anything up, just wondering if the Mayor's assertion is accurate or if it's just political rhetoric. This also seems to be the most major incident in which a command conflict could have occurred since 9/11.
    My best wishes to all injured for a speedy and complete recovery and prayers to all families involved.
    The fires went out, evidence was gathered, terrorism was ruled out, searches made. It was all done in a timely manner.

    Okay?

    Leave a comment:


  • ChiefSquirrel
    replied
    Bloomberg touts the 'unified command' as a complete success with FDNY and NYPD all playing nicely together. What about it FDNY brothers....is that an accurate assessment?
    I'm not trying to stir anything up, just wondering if the Mayor's assertion is accurate or if it's just political rhetoric. This also seems to be the most major incident in which a command conflict could have occurred since 9/11.
    My best wishes to all injured for a speedy and complete recovery and prayers to all families involved.

    Leave a comment:


  • firetruckred
    replied
    Originally posted by E40FDNYL35
    yes I was...my boss had CityWide...and the boy's did a GREAT JOB, as always.
    I am glad to hear you are ok as well as the other Firefighters. : )

    My condolences to the Lidle family, friends and the Yankee's.

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    While I have some considerable flying experience in small a/c, even though not a rated pilot, I will refrain from making comment on NYC air travel corridors. However I do have some questions, but those can wait - likely they will be answered shortly, and if not, I know there are a couple folks in here who live/fly in the area and will be able to answer for me. Also a look into my 1983 Edition, North American Flight Suppliment guide might answer some of my questions too. In any case, here is a news update:

    Official: No Distress Call From Lidle's Plane. Two People Killed As Plane Crashes Into Building

    POSTED: 7:08 am EDT October 12, 2006
    UPDATED: 9:24 am EDT October 12, 2006

    NEW YORK -- Federal investigators are backing away from an earlier report of a distress call from Cory Lidle's plane.

    They now said the FAA has found no indication of a mayday call during the 15 minutes the plane was airborne before it crashed into a 40-story high-rise condo on Manhattan's upper east side -- at 72nd Street and York Ave.

    The plane carrying the New York Yankees pitcher and an instructor had taken off from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey and had flown for barely 15 minutes. Both were killed in the crash Wednesday.

    Investigators said it's too early to determine what caused the crash. But a witness said the plane appeared to be trailing smoke and was flying erratically.

    The small plane was equipped with a parachute so it could float to Earth in case of a mishap. But the parachute apparently did not engage.

    The crash rained flaming debris onto the sidewalks and briefly raised fears of another terrorist attack.

    Cory Lidle's twin brother Kevin said he had spoken to their parents, who were "obviously having a tough time." Kevin Lidle said he's "in some kind of state of shock."

    Lidle was doing what he loved when he died.

    He told a TV interviewer once that no matter what's going on in your life, when you're flying, "everything's gone."

    A federal official said Lidle's passport was found on the street. It's not yet clear who was at the controls of the plane, a Cirrus SR-20.

    FAA records show the plane was registered to Lidle, who had repeatedly assured reporters in recent weeks that flying was safe and that the Yankees had no reason to worry.

    The New York Yankees are stunned by news that Lidle was aboard the plane.

    Team owner George Steinbrenner issued a statement calling it a "terrible and shocking tragedy" and offering "deep condolences and prayers" to Lidle's wife and son.

    On the team's Web site, manager Joe Torre is quoted as saying he was with former Yankees Ron Guidry and Lee Mazzilli when they got the news. Torre said that while Lidle's time with the Yankees was short, he proved himself to be "a good teammate and a great competitor."

    Lidle came to the Bronx in a July trade with the Philadelphia Phillies. He spent nine seasons in the majors, playing for seven teams.

    New York Yankee Jason Giambi said he's "in a state of shock" over Lidle's sudden death.

    The Yankees aren't strangers to tragedies involving planes. In 1979, catcher Thurman Munson died when the plane he was piloting crashed.

    Residents React

    Some of the residents of the Manhattan building hit by a plane managed to escape. Others came home to the shock of their lives.

    Photographer Richard Drutman was at home on the 11th floor when the plane hit several floors above. Drutman says he was on the phone when all of a sudden there was a "huge explosion." He looked out the window to see what he believes were pieces of the wings falling past. Drutman and his girlfriend then quickly got out.

    Mystery writer Carol Higgins Clark has a 38th -floor apartment. She was heading home in a taxi when she saw the smoke and realized something was wrong.

    Clark, the daughter of author Mary Higgins Clark, described the building's residents as a mix of actors, doctors, lawyers and fellow writers.

    Athletes Fixtures In Private Planes, Few As Pilots.

    A top official of Major League Baseball said it's not the right time to talk about whether baseball should prohibit players from piloting.

    Chief Operating Officer Bob DuPuy said baseball is still grieving the death of Lidle DuPuy said baseball will consider the matter "in a much longer window."

    In the NBA, "operating an aircraft of any kind" is listed in the uniform player contract as a prohibited activity, requiring written consent of the team.

    The standard NFL contract has a provision that players can't "engage in activities other than football which may involve a significant risk of personal injury" without prior written consent from the team.

    An NHL official said pro hockey's standard contract prohibits players "from engaging in other dangerous sports" but said piloting can be negotiated individually.

    NASCAR drivers and teams rely heavily on flying, and most drivers own personal planes. Some are licensed pilots.

    How Military Got Jets In Air So Quickly

    The crash of the small plane was an accident, not terrorism. But in the moments after it happened, no one knew for sure. And the military apparently wasn't taking chances.

    The head of the U.S. Northern Command said dozens of fighter jets took to the skies not only over New York, but also the nation's capital and other cities. They include places thousands of miles from the crash scene, like Los Angeles.

    According to Admiral Timothy Keating, planes were flying "less than 10 minutes" after he gave the order when he saw the crash on TV. Within half-an-hour, he said military brass knew it probably wasn't terrorism. Officials plan to continue the patrols for an unspecified period of time, after which the fighters will stay on high alert.

    The U.S. Northern Command was created after Sept. 11, 2001. Keating said they were better prepared now than on that day.

    Previous Story:
    October 11, 2006: NYC Plane Crash Kills Yankees Pitcher

    Distributed by Internet Broadcasting Systems, Inc. The Associated Press contributed to this report.


    Mostly I am just glad that there were no other significant injuires etc. Although nothing heard on the FDNY guys - hope they are well. I find the players' contract statements about dangerous activities and in some cases, "no flying" clause to be of interest.

    Leave a comment:


  • scvfd412
    replied
    My prayers go out to the family of the ones killed; I hope a speedy recovery for the ones injured and I must say, good job to the FDNY.

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyThirteen
    replied
    Originally posted by nmfire
    No, that isn't why. It is because I have a clue about aviation so I'm not just talking out my *** like those people. They were scud-running and flying into instrument conditions under visual flight rules.
    Whatever you know about aviation matters not. The simple fact remains that you were not there and therefore can't pass judgement as to why it happened. Until all the facts are in, any guess is pure speculation.

    That being said, kudos to FDNY for taking such prompt action and a speedy recovery to the injured FFs.
    Last edited by LuckyThirteen; 10-12-2006, 07:16 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nine3Probie
    replied
    ..........................
    Last edited by Nine3Probie; 07-28-2013, 05:48 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • E40FDNYL35
    replied
    Originally posted by Nine3Probie
    I wonder if E40FDNYL35 made the run. I saw a pic that had L35 in the background.
    yes I was...my boss had CityWide...and the boy's did a GREAT JOB, as always.

    Leave a comment:


  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    Cirrus SR20

    By RICHARD PYLE
    Associated Press Writer
    NEW YORK (AP) - The plane that crashed into the side of a
    high-rise apartment building Wednesday comes equipped with a
    parachute designed to be triggered by the pilot in case of an
    aerial mishap, but there was no evidence the feature was used.
    The Cirrus SR20 is the first production aircraft to have as
    standard equipment a Ballistic Recovery System parachute, which a
    pilot can activate if the engine fails or if the plane is involved
    in a collision. It also has energy-absorbing features meant to
    reduce impact in a crash.
    The parachute, if triggered, should shoot out above the plane,
    allowing it to drift to safety belly first rather than crash.
    "These airplanes are just absolutely cutting edge in terms of
    how modern they are, and they ought to be extremely safe," said
    Mike Radomsky, president of the Cirrus Owners and Pilots
    Association, which conducts safety classes for Cirrus pilots.
    The single-engine private aircraft can carry up to four people.
    It is steered by a joystick on the side of the cockpit rather than
    with a steering wheel in the front.
    About 2,900 SR20s or its successor, the SR22, are in service
    around the world, and the 3,000th one is in production, said Kate
    Dougherty, spokeswoman for the Cirrus Design Corp. of Duluth,
    Minn., which makes the plane. She said she could not discuss the
    planes' safety record or provide any information about the one that
    crashed Wednesday.
    New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle was killed in the crash,
    along with a second person.
    It was the second fatal accident involving an SR20 within a
    month, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. On
    Sept. 15, a private pilot was killed after reporting icing
    conditions. The NTSB is still investigating.
    There have been a total of 12 accidents involving the Cirrus
    SR20, though one happened while the plane was still in an
    experimental stage. NTSB records indicate that six accidents were
    fatal, killing 13 people.
    In two accidents this year, pilots reported engines losing
    power.
    There are about 600 Cirrus SR20s registered to the Federal
    Aviation Administration. The plane was first flown as a prototype
    in March 1995, according to the Web site Airliners.net.
    Safety problems related to the SR20 have figured in about a
    dozen lawsuits, some involving design and mechanical issues, some
    pilot error and some a combination of both, said Brian Alexander,
    an aviation lawyer for the New York-based firm Kreindler &
    Kreindler.
    Several cases involved the parachute, which has deployed
    successfully sometimes and unsuccessfully other times, Alexander
    said. Problems generally had to do with the explosive mechanism,
    triggered by the pilot, that pushes out the parachute, he said.
    The low-wing aircraft sells for about $280,000. Its
    200-horsepower Teledyne Continental six-cylinder piston engine
    produces a maximum cruising speed of 160 mph. It has a roomier
    cabin and larger windows than many of its competitors.
    Cirrus made flyable kit aircraft until 1993. Its original kit
    model, the VK30, was the basis of the SR20. The SR20 is made of a
    composite glass fiber and foam-core material, instead of the
    riveted aluminum of more traditional planes.
    ---
    Associated Press writers Joshua Freed in Minneapolis and Leslie
    Miller in Washington contributed to this report.

    Leave a comment:


  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    More... AP story

    By COLLEEN LONG
    Associated Press Writer
    NEW YORK (AP) - A small plane carrying New York Yankee Cory
    Lidle slammed into a 40-story apartment building Wednesday after
    issuing a distress call, killing the pitcher and a second person in
    a crash that rained flaming debris onto the sidewalks and briefly
    raised fears of another terrorist attack.
    A law enforcement official in Washington said Lidle - an avid
    pilot who got his license during last year's offseason - was aboard
    the single-engine aircraft when it plowed into the 30th and 31st
    floors of the condominium high-rise on Manhattan's Upper East Side.
    Mayor Michael Bloomberg said both people aboard were killed.
    Lidle's passport was found on the street, according to a federal
    official, speaking to The Associated Press on condition of
    anonymity. It was not immediately clear who was at the controls and
    who was the second person aboard. There was no official
    confirmation of Lidle's death from city officials.
    Federal Aviation Administration records showed the plane was
    registered to Lidle, who had repeatedly assured reporters in recent
    weeks that flying was safe and that the Yankees - who were
    traumatized in 1979 when catcher Thurman Munson was killed in the
    crash of a plane he was piloting - had no reason to worry.
    "The flying?" the 34-year-old Lidle, who had a home near Los
    Angeles, told The Philadelphia Inquirer this summer. "I'm not
    worried about it. I'm safe up there. I feel very comfortable with
    my abilities flying an airplane."
    "No matter what's going on in your life, when you get up in
    that plane, everything's gone," Lidle told a Comcast SportsNet
    interviewer while flying his plane in April.
    The crash came just four days after the Yankees' embarrassingly
    quick elimination from the playoffs, during which Lidle had been
    relegated to the bullpen. In recent days, Lidle had taken abuse
    from fans on sports talk radio for saying the team was unprepared.
    "This is a terrible and shocking tragedy that has stunned the
    entire Yankees organization," Yankees owner George Steinbrenner
    said in a statement. He offered his condolences to Lidle's wife,
    Melanie, and 6-year-old son.
    The federal official said the plane had issued a distress call
    before the crash. The craft took off from New Jersey's Teterboro
    Airport about 2:30 p.m. and was in the air for barely 15 minutes,
    authorities said. Bloomberg said Lidle and his flying companion
    were sightseeing and were taking a route that took them over the
    Statue of Liberty, the Brooklyn Bridge and the Empire State
    Building.
    The FAA said it was too early to determine what might have
    caused the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board sent
    investigators.
    How the plane managed to penetrate airspace over one of the most
    densely packed sections of New York City was not clear. The plane
    was unusual in that it was equipped with a parachute in case of
    engine failure, but there was no sign the chute was used.
    The crash rattled New Yorkers' nerves five years after the Sept.
    11 attacks, but the FBI and the Homeland Security quickly said
    there was no evidence it was anything but an accident.
    Nevertheless, within 10 minutes of the crash, fighter jets were
    sent aloft over several cities, including New York, Washington,
    Detroit, Los Angeles and Seattle, Pentagon officials said.
    The plane, flying north over the East River, along the usual
    flight corridor, came through a hazy, cloudy sky and hit The
    Belaire - a red-brick tower overlooking the river - with a loud
    bang. It touched off a raging fire that cast a pillar of black
    smoke over the city and sent flames shooting from four windows on
    two adjoining floors. Firefighters put the blaze out in less than
    an hour.
    At least 21 people were taken to the hospital, most of them
    firefighters. Their conditions were not disclosed.
    Large crowds gathered in the street in the largely wealthy New
    York neighborhood, with many people in tears and some trying to
    reach loved ones by cell phone.
    "It wasn't until I was halfway home that I started shaking. The
    whole memory of an airplane flying into a building and across the
    street from your home. It's a little too close to home," Sara
    Green, 40, who lives across the street from The Belaire. "It
    crossed my mind that it was something bigger or the start of
    something bigger."
    Outside Lidle's home in Glendora, Calif., neighbors and others
    quickly converged. Keri Pasqua, a close friend of the player's
    wife, and Mary Varela, Lidle's mother-in-law, told reporters that
    Melanie Lidle wasn't home and they weren't certain if she knew
    about the crash.
    "This is a tragedy for everybody involved," a teary-eyed
    Varela said.
    Kevin Lidle, Cory Lidle's twin brother, said on CNN's "Larry
    King Live" that he had spoken to their parents, who were
    "obviously having a tough time."
    "But what can you do? Somehow you hang in there and you get
    through it," he said. "I've had a lot of calls from friends and
    family, people calling and crying. And they've released some
    emotions, and I haven't done that yet. I don't know - I guess I'm
    in some kind of state of shock."
    On Sunday, the day after the Yankees were eliminated from the
    playoffs, Lidle cleaned out his locker at Yankee Stadium and talked
    about his interest in flying.
    He said he intended to fly back to California in several days
    and planned to make a few stops. Cory Lidle had reserved a room for
    Wednesday night at the historic Union Station hotel in downtown
    Nashville, Tenn., hotel spokeswoman Melanie Fly said.
    Lidle discussed with reporters the plane crash that killed John
    F. Kennedy Jr. and how he had read the accident report on the NTSB
    Web site.
    Lidle, acquired from the Philadelphia Phillies on July 30, told
    The New York Times last month that his four-seat Cirrus SR20 was
    safe.
    "The whole plane has a parachute on it," Lidle said.
    "Ninety-nine percent of pilots that go up never have engine
    failure, and the 1 percent that do usually land it. But if you're
    up in the air and something goes wrong, you pull that parachute,
    and the whole plane goes down slowly."
    Lidle pitched 1 1/3 innings in the fourth and final game of the
    Division Series against the Detroit Tigers and gave up three earned
    runs, but was not the losing pitcher. He had a 12-10 regular-season
    record with a 4.85 ERA.
    He pitched with the Phillies before coming to the Yankees. He
    began his career in 1997 with the Mets, and also pitched for Tampa
    Bay, Oakland, Toronto and Cincinnati.
    Lidle's $6.3 million, two-year contract, agreed with the
    Phillies in November 2004, contained a provision saying the team
    could get out of paying the remainder if he were injured or killed
    while flying a plane. Because the regular season is over, Lidle
    already had received the full amount.
    After the Yankees' defeat at the hands of the Tigers, Lidle
    called in to WFAN sports-talk radio two days before the crash to
    defend manager Joe Torre, and said: "I want to win as much as
    anybody. But what am I supposed to do? Go cry in my apartment for
    the next two weeks."
    Lidle was an outcast among some teammates throughout his career
    because he became a replacement player in 1995, when major leaguers
    were on strike.
    Among the baseball stars killed in plane crashes were Roberto
    Clemente, Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder, killed Dec. 31, 1972, at
    age 38 while en route to Nicaragua to aid earthquake victims; and
    Munson, the Yankee catcher killed Aug. 2, 1979, at age 32 in
    Canton, Ohio.
    "It's just sadder than sad," said New York Mets pitching coach
    Rick Peterson, who was Lidle's pitching coach in Oakland. "It's
    horrific. It's almost unbelievable. It's a surreal moment."
    Young May Cha, a 23-year-old Cornell University medical student,
    said she was walking back from the grocery store down East 72nd
    Street when she saw something come across the sky and crash into
    the building. Cha said there appeared to be smoke coming from
    behind the aircraft, and "it looked like it was flying erratically
    for the short time that I saw it."
    Former NTSB director Jim Hall said in a telephone interview he
    does not understand how a plane could get so close to a New York
    City building after Sept. 11.
    "We're under a high alert and you would assume that if
    something like this happened, people would have known about it
    before it occurred, not after," Hall said.
    Mystery writer Carol Higgins Clark, daughter of author Mary
    Higgins Clark, lives in the building but was not home at the time.
    She described the building's residents as a mix of actors, doctors,
    lawyers and writers, and people with second homes.
    Despite initial fears of a terrorist attack, all three New York
    City-area airports continued to operate normally, FAA spokesman Jim
    Peters said. The White House said neither President Bush nor Vice
    President Dick Cheney was moved to secure locations.
    The Belaire was built in the late 1980s and is situated near
    Sotheby's auction house. It has 183 apartments, many of which sell
    for more than $1 million.
    Several lower floors are occupied by doctors and administrative
    offices, as well as guest facilities for family members of patients
    at the Hospital for Special Surgery, hospital spokeswoman Phyllis
    Fisher said. No patients were in the high-rise, Fisher said.
    ---
    Associated Press writers Pat Milton, Robert Tanner and Adam
    Goldman in New York; Robert Weller in Denver; Daisy Nguyen in Los
    Angeles; Leslie Miller and Lara Jakes Jordan in Washington; and AP
    sports writers Ronald Blum and Mike Fitzpatrick contributed to this
    report.

    Leave a comment:

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