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  • FD Challenge Coins

    Who has them and how are they used?
    Resident Chaplain of the IACOJ

  • #2
    I don' t know in the fire service how they work, but we had them in the Army. Usually unique to your brigade or battalion. 2 guys met for drinks, if one produced his coin and the other couldn't, the one without bought. Company pride, you know!

    Engineers, Lay Hold!!

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    • #3

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      • #4
        HOWEVER... as with all things there was this "detour"..... If the challenged PRODUCES his coin, the challenger get to buy! Or at least thats how it works in most Canadian Regiments.

        The coins are great, except that I now have 3 or 4 that I would have to carry around with me......
        If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

        "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

        "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

        Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

        impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

        IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by quint1officer
          I don' t know in the fire service how they work, but we had them in the Army. Usually unique to your brigade or battalion. 2 guys met for drinks, if one produced his coin and the other couldn't, the one without bought. Company pride, you know!

          Engineers, Lay Hold!!
          Along the same lines, We always carried them, but it was whoever produced the "highest ranking" coin. Some had a Battalion coin, while others may have had a Division presented to them. Whoever had the "lowest ranking" coin bought the round. Thankfully I was fortunate to have recieved a Sergeant Major of the Army coin, so it was usally a cheap night for me!!
          A Fire Chief has ONLY 1 JOB and that's to take care of his fireman. EVERYTHING else falls under this.

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          • #6
            We have them. If one member challenges another member and the challenged member does not have the coin then they must complete the challenge. If the member challenged is able to produce their coin then the challenger must complete the challenge. They can be used either on or off duty at social functions.

            To my knowledge they are not used that much, except to get a rookie who has no clue

            Oh yea, the challenge must be legal and moral
            K-9 hunt, the ultimate challange.
            EVERYONE GOES HOME
            IACOJ

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BFDLT32

              Oh yea, the challenge must be legal and moral

              Well, that takes all the fun out of it.


              Tanker
              I.A.C.O.J. Firefighter/EMT-B

              "I'm gonna drill a hole in your skull and pump out all the stupidity"
              Gunny Ermey


              "Never underestimate the Power of Stupid People in Large Groups"


              Humpty Dumpty was pushed

              Polishing the Chrome on all the IACOJ "apparati"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tanker5117
                Well, that takes all the fun out of it.


                Tanker
                Yea I know
                K-9 hunt, the ultimate challange.
                EVERYONE GOES HOME
                IACOJ

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                • #9
                  The department that hosted my rookie school had challenge coins. If the challenged couldn't produce thier coin 20 push ups and if the challenged did produce the challenger had to do 20. I could think of some better challenges but I guess they liked it.

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                  • #10
                    http://www.firehousecoins.com/

                    Soldiers in active combat originally popularized the tradition of the challenge coin, which served as an identifying token signifying membership in an elite combat or flying unit. Now, nearly every squadron or unit possess such coins and each member receives one. That tradition spread to many police departments and elsewhere as a natural extension to express pride and belonging.

                    Challenge coins of military tradition go by a number of different names, including unit coins, commander’s coins, military coins and more. Regardless of the name, the coin identifies its bearer as a unit member and is a symbol of pride, respect and fellowship. Today, most every military unit creates its own coin, which every member carries.

                    The military history of using coins or medallions for recognition or identification tells many stories. In the Roman Empire, coins were presented to reward achievements, much in the way medals are now.

                    More recently, in the 1980 Australian movie “Breaker Morant,” one tradition is illustrated that began during The Boar War, a war of independence between the British and the Colony of South Africa (1899-1902). A number of contracted soldiers of fortune were serving the British and did so valiantly, but were never honored for their valor. In one scene, the Regimental Sergeants Majors (RSMs) sneak into the tents of officers who were undeserving recipients of a medal, then cut and remove each undeserved medal from its ribbon. Later, in a ceremony before the regiment, each deserving soldier received a special handshake. When the hands were clasped, the medallion was discreetly (and essentially invisibly) palmed into the hand of the recipient. A number of stories tell of similar handshake rituals in which a coin is palmed to a soldier to convey a reward for their heroism, but without the appearance of a bonus being bestowed.

                    A widely circulated story from World War I tells of an American pilot shot down behind enemy lines in Germany near the French border. This pilot was a lucky member of a squadron in which a wealthy member had medallions struck in bronze for each squadron member. Captured by Germans, he had all personal items confiscated, except the medallion which he carried in a pouch around his neck. Escaping, he donned civilian clothing and managed to cross to France. Stumbling into a French outpost, the soldiers there did not recognize him as American, and were about to execute him as a saboteur when he showed them his medallion. It served as convincing proof. Instead of a bullet, he received wine.

                    According to Soldiers Magazine (August ’94, story by Maj. Jeanne Fraser Brooks), in the early 1960s, a soldier in the 11th Special Forces Group (SFG), over-stamped some old coins with their emblem, then gave them to unit members. The 10th SFG soon followed suit with their own coins.

                    During the Vietnam War, another series of stories is well reported. The elite front and behind enemy lines fighters took to a tradition of carrying one special bullet from their combat weapon, carried in the hip pocket, to use in suicide in the event of enemy capture. On R&R, at the bar or hootch, a soldier could be challenged to show his bullet. If he could not, he would buy a round of drinks. If he did produce the bullet, his challenger bought the drinks. The story goes on to say, in shows of machismo, larger and larger rounds were displayed, getting up to 105mm live cannon shells. In order to bring safety to the challenge tradition, coins were mandated to be substituted for live rounds. Such coins were personalized with control numbers and sometimes the person’s name. The challenge tradition remains in effect today, and loss of a prized coin considered a disgrace.

                    I gave each member of my department custom challenge coins engraved with their names and badge number, this past Christmas, they were a big hit
                    Last edited by Chief2701; 09-19-2006, 03:35 PM.
                    [FONT=Times New Roman]Douglas R. Patton
                    IACOJ
                    "Omnis Cedo Domus"
                    I am now a former Chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone.
                    Isaiah 6:8

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                    • #11
                      Jefferson City Fire Department

                      Here's what we did...
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by jdturner04; 09-19-2006, 03:52 PM.

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                      • #12
                        A very good friend of mine, Ronny Coleman had some CCs made up after 9/11. Ronny is a former CA State Fire Marshal, US Marine and also gave me a printed history behind them. I can fax it to you if needed.

                        Enclosed are some pictures.




                        You might be able to reach Ronny here- Fire Force One
                        Last edited by CALFFBOU; 09-19-2006, 09:34 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Jaybird210 has them also ...........they are cool. Also Ronnt Coleman always writes a great column in FC Magazine.
                          IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
                          Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
                          ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
                          RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
                          LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
                          I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
                          "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
                          http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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                          • #14
                            Very nice coins gentlemen!

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                            • #15
                              Sorry I messed up the second picture. I can reprint it if someone wants to see it.
                              Last edited by CALFFBOU; 09-20-2006, 12:16 PM.

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