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  • How to Follow NFPA?

    Perhaps this question has been answered before, but here it is.

    How do poor VFD's like ours follow NFPA codes when you have to pay for a subscription or pay for the CD's to get them? Are the codes listed somewhere for free? Thanks

  • #2
    Two words..

    Pool resources!

    Go in with other Departments, share the updates as they are relesed.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    • #3
      You can go to their website, www.nfpa.org, and view the codes.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LTscott351
        You can go to their website, www.nfpa.org, and view the codes.
        Not quite....to view the codes, you have to pay $$$ for membership...several hundred dollars, I think. The cost would be prohibitive for a financially strapped department.
        Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
        Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
        Paincourtville, LA

        "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
        — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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        • #5
          Chief:

          NFPA allows anyone to view the codes for free.

          Take NFPA 1410 for example. Click on "Preview this document" link on the bottom of the page.

          While you may look for free, you cannot print, or copy/paste the codes from here.

          The subscription servcie is expensive. I think we pay about $750 a year for the CD of the codes plus updates. That is a lot of money to many fire departments.
          Last edited by KenNFD1219; 10-01-2006, 07:40 AM.
          -------------------
          "The most mediocre man or woman can suddenly seem dynamic, forceful, and decisive if he or she is mean enough." from "Crazy Bosses"
          -----------------------------------------------
          Genius has its limits, but stupidity is boundless.

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          • #6
            Follow OSHA.

            NFPA is mostly a tool for manufacturers to decree obsolesence.
            Weekly updates on the world of rope:

            http://rescue2training.com/journal.html

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            • #7
              Exactly DCFD.

              To be honest, most departments probably don't follow ALL the NFPA guidlines anyway. I know we certainly don't. We follow the ones that are big and/or convienient.

              When purchasing, use manufacturers as resources. For the most part, you cannot spec or purchase anything that is not compliant at the time of sale anyway.
              RK
              cell #901-494-9437

              Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

              "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


              Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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              • #8
                I have heard of several folks who got their local libraries to purchase a copy of the NFPA codes and standards. That could be a good way to get pooled resources to work, too, since everyone (public included) can look at them.
                ullrichk
                a.k.a.
                perfesser

                a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

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                • #9
                  Thanks Ken, I thought there was a way to do that, but I could never get it to work.

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                  • #10
                    if your state adopts nfpa 1 and 101 nfpa will supply your state with all the free books you want, ofcourse if you want it on disk thats up to you to purchase..im speaking of the code books for inspections ofcourse..not sure if that is what you're asking though

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                    • #11
                      I would like to see one department that foloows NFPA to a T. I believe it to be nearly if all impossible. Why do would someone want to subject themselves to some of those crazy "GUIDELINES" anyway. NFPA is NOT law.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We all know that NFPA only makes recommendations, and we all have our own opinions on NFPA and what they can do with many of their standards. However, if an injury occurs, you are screwed if you are sued, because in the court room, NFPA is the bible.
                        Chris Shields
                        Lieutenant / EMT
                        Haz-Mat Technician
                        East Syracuse Fire Dept
                        Onondaga County, NY

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ehs7554
                          I would like to see one department that foloows NFPA to a T. I believe it to be nearly if all impossible. Why do would someone want to subject themselves to some of those crazy "GUIDELINES" anyway. NFPA is NOT law.
                          alot of states have adopted parts of NFPA as law..just to point out that it is law sometimes and as signal pointed out..what do you think the lawyers will use?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SIGNAL99COM
                            We all know that NFPA only makes recommendations, and we all have our own opinions on NFPA and what they can do with many of their standards. However, if an injury occurs, you are screwed if you are sued, because in the court room, NFPA is the bible.
                            Does anyone have a citation were failure to follow an NFPA standard resulted in civil liability? I am not looking for a case where NFPA was used along with other evidence of negligance, but rather where non-compliance with a voluntary NFPA standard resulted in a civil liability. I made this request to NFPA several years ago and after a couple of e-mails to clarify what I wanted, I never heard back from them.


                            As the authority having jurisdiction, my FD has both adopted NFPA standards as written and with modifications. There are approximately 150 NFPA standards that affect fire department operations, from the Life Safety Code to water supply and fire attack to vehicle design. No one department can reasonably be expected to follow all the standards. How can a fire department that cannot even afford to buy the codes be expected to follow them? However, if a city or state adopts an NFPA standard as a law or regulation, compliance is mandatory.
                            -------------------
                            "The most mediocre man or woman can suddenly seem dynamic, forceful, and decisive if he or she is mean enough." from "Crazy Bosses"
                            -----------------------------------------------
                            Genius has its limits, but stupidity is boundless.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Open preview. Go to section you need. Hit "Print Screen", then paste into MS Word. Print.

                              Originally posted by ThNozzleMan
                              Why? Because we are firemen. We are decent human beings. We would be compelled by the overwhelming impulse to save an innocent child from a tragic, painful death because in the end, we are MEN.

                              I A C O J
                              FTM-PTB


                              Honorary Disclaimer: While I am a manufacturer representative, I am not here to sell my product. Any advice or knowledge shared is for informational purposes only. I do not use Firehouse.Com for promotional purposes.

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