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  • Faliure to Yield

    Is it against the law in your state to not yield for fire apparatus?

  • #2
    Nevermind. during a recent EVOC class my "instructor" told me a number of things that were completly off base including that it wasnt against the law to not yield to fire apparatus. This guy was a total moron. In about 5 minutes on the web i found 4 or 5 sub-sections in the vehicle code that contradicted what he said. How do people like that become instructor.

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    • #3
      With the exception of a few.....

      Those who can't do, teach.
      Jason Knecht
      Firefighter/EMT
      Township Fire Dept., Inc.
      Eau Claire, WI

      IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
      http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
      EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

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      • #4
        My state has "move-over" laws for emergency vehicles. It also has refence to "with regard for public safety" verbage that cautions that emergency vehicles have lots of discretion but they must not be recklessly driven (paraphrasing). Most departments I am aware of have additional policies about clearing intersections etc. as well as maximum allowed speed.

        Michigan PA300 of 1949 is a big thick book but department policy augments it.

        Generally cops do not follow every apparatus to give out tickets to drivers who don't yield, however.

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        • #5
          I don't think he was a moron. He's probably just seen too many cases where someone turned right around and sued the fire department and/or the driver because the "fire engine hit them while running lights and sirens." Laws don't mean jack crap to a family who just lost their teenage daughter because she was talking on her cell phone while driving instead of watching or listening for that ladder truck coming through the intersection. But the lawyers of that family give a jack crap because they see the $$$ coming in, and THEY WILL FIND SOME WAY to make you look like the bad guy.

          He might have lied to you for a reason. Maybe he didn't want you to get all fired up and think you are invincible while you're sitting in the driver's seat of a 15 ton truck. Those laws are written by politicians, not responders.
          "Yeah, but as I've always said, this country has A.D.D." - Denis Leary

          http://www.lettertogop.com/

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GodSendRain
            He might have lied to you for a reason. Maybe he didn't want you to get all fired up and think you are invincible while you're sitting in the driver's seat of a 15 ton truck. Those laws are written by politicians, not responders.
            That is quiet possibly the dumbest idea i have ever heard. (not calling you dumb) If that is in fact what he did, by lying his class lost all validity in most of the classes eyes. Why not tell us what the law really says and trust that we are professional emergency personnel and will use our best judgement. We are not kids and can infact handle the truth

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            • #7
              Generally cops do not follow every apparatus to give out tickets to drivers who don't yield, however.
              Bingo. Laws are only effective if enforced.

              It's rare that a peace officer happens to be in the vicinity of a code-3 ambulance or apparatus to see anyone failing to yield...often those officers are also responding to calls (probably the same one the ambo or engine is *LOL*) and cannot stop and take 15 mins to pull traffic for FTY.

              Even if they did pull traffic on people...how many vehicles regularly fail to yield on the open highways/freeways, multi-lane streets, etc? Even if you did have a cop around, he can only stop and cite one vehicle at a time. SO...the mindset is the same as with speeding, people figure that hey, the whole pack is speeding, and he can only stop one of us...I'll take my chances.

              You know how it is: getting to the store 30 seconds later will just absolutely trash anyone's day, ruin their life, destroy their marriage, and kill their dog/cat.
              My opinions might coincide with someone of importance's POV... I wouldn't know, since I never bothered to ask. My policy is: "Don't ask, don't care."

              IACOJ--West Coast PITA

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              • #8
                check your state laws. It may be that if you write down the liscense plates you can have a cite sent to them.

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                • #9
                  Yeah,Kentucky and Tennessee both have a move over law.But we rarely have time to get the tag number of the offending vehicle and hand it off to the SO for further action.
                  Just because a law exists doesn't mean people automatically follow it.I've seen in my return to Tennessee that most speed limit signs seem to be suggestions.
                  LIke another poster says,the police cannot always follow the rig to cite offenders and if they do trail along,they're usually going to the same call and have traffic control and wreck investigation in mind than pulling folks over for traffic citations.

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                  • #10
                    doughesson,

                    Agreed. We have the law here, but I have never ever seen anyone cited for it. We are lucky if we can even get the police on any scene we have in a timely fashion, let alone make sure people are moving out from in front of us along the way!!
                    RK
                    cell #901-494-9437

                    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

                    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


                    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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                    • #11
                      Yes, in Fla it is against the law not to yield to an emergency vehicle. Ive seen PD pull people over in the past for not moving out of our way. PD is very good about that, at least in my area.
                      Fire Marshal/Safety Officer

                      IAAI-NFPA-IAFC/VCOS-Retired IAFF

                      "No his mind is not for rent, to any god or government"
                      RUSH-Tom Sawyer

                      Success is when skill meets opportunity
                      Failure is when fantasy meets reality

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                      • #12
                        I could be wrong (happens often), but I have been checking Idaho law lately for this specific issue.

                        I can find city and county ordinances that require people yield to emergency vehicles, but I haven't (yet) found a specific state law requiring the same thing.

                        I did find the State Law that holds emergency vehicle operators liable for accidents caused when they are not following traffic laws.

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                        • #13
                          In TN it is a traffic citation for failure to yield. I cited a guy a couple of months ago for it. It cost him a ride to jail because his license ended up being suspended.

                          Because of several recent officer fatalities in Nashville and surrounding counties, several DA's are pushing for the law to become an arrestable offense. So rather than getting a citation, we haul your a** to jail.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by swfire42
                            That is quiet possibly the dumbest idea i have ever heard. (not calling you dumb) If that is in fact what he did, by lying his class lost all validity in most of the classes eyes. Why not tell us what the law really says and trust that we are professional emergency personnel and will use our best judgement. We are not kids and can infact handle the truth

                            Wow, that is enlightingly. I don't know about you, but most jobs I have had there is always 'What is written' and there is 'This is how we do this'. Maybe other than slamming this instructor for 'lying' to you. You may want to find out why he had given the information that way. Like was pointed out he may just trying to do you favor. Yes, it may not have been the most accurate way to inform you. Yet, if he stood there and said, 'Gee, there is law that saids we have the right away, but you have to respond with all due care.' Most people 9 times out of 10(with some groups this would be high, and other would be too low) would stop listen after being told they had the right away. They would give the rest of the sentence another thought again until they were being sued.

                            As said laywers don't give two cents that legally you had the right away, for there are dozen other laws that make it so cloudy and clear as mud in court of law. Those cases that go before juries too are the worse in which you, various others who may not know what all the various laws may state or means to look this up when they make their decisions.

                            So maybe you should ask the instructor why, instead of coming here before you have talk to him. Or for that fact give this information to others your class. The instructor is trying to teach you how to do something safely. Way it sounds now most of the class will not really pay attention to him due to they think he is full of BS. Which isn't good, for it may save your life later on what he has to say.

                            Just some thoughts...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SgtScott31
                              In TN it is a traffic citation for failure to yield. I cited a guy a couple of months ago for it. It cost him a ride to jail because his license ended up being suspended.

                              Because of several recent officer fatalities in Nashville and surrounding counties, several DA's are pushing for the law to become an arrestable offense. So rather than getting a citation, we haul your a** to jail.

                              This sounds like too over due in too many areas of US. I for one hope they succeed. Maybe after a couple time of being arrested, people will get the idea to pull over... Then again, maybe not...

                              Comment

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