Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1st alarm, 2nd alarm, going 3rd

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • firetruckred
    replied
    Thank you all for contributing to this thread with such in deepth answers. This is definetly going into the My Favorites file for future reference and reflection.

    Leave a comment:


  • firetruckred
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods
    Go to www.PGCVFRA.org and all the Station sites are linked from there. Some of the individual Station's Sites have a link for listening in on PGFD radio channels.
    Thank you H.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Here's More............

    Originally posted by firetruckred
    Thanks Hwoods. I would like to learn more about PG County. I was not aware until recently that they are the second busiest Dept.
    Go to www.PGCVFRA.org and all the Station sites are linked from there. Some of the individual Station's Sites have a link for listening in on PGFD radio channels.

    Leave a comment:


  • SteveDude
    replied
    Not entirely relevant because it isn't the US...but over here in the UK, with the exception of West Yorkshire Fire Service who use the US 'Alarm' system, we simply ask for what we want...

    The initial call will between 2 Pumps and 3 Pumps and an aerial depending on where in the UK you are.

    Generally the first assistance message for a working job will be 'Make Pumps three' or 'Make Pumps Four'... in larger Metropolitain brigades it will usually go to four because we have 100's of Fire Trucks..the counties will usually go to three. A 4 Pump Fire (16-20Ff's) will be a good working job in a house etc...

    A large House, good Residential High Rise a small factory etc will usally go to 6 Pumps....

    A large High Rise fire, a major warehouse blaze will usually go to around 20 to 30 Pumps... Aerials are requested seperately i.e 'Make Pumps 10 Aerials 2" So, if the job had 6 Pumps and one aerial, that call would get another 4 Pumps and another aerial making 10 & 2 in total.

    Things like Command units, Rescue, BA supoort, Hose layers will come on at set stages unless more are required...i.e an 8 Pump Major Special Service for a train Crash may attratc 3 Rescues, USAR & USAR support pumps on top of the standard 8 Pumps...but then the IC may want 2 more rescue Co's so he will "Make Fire Rescue Units 5"

    Chiefs of increasingly higher ranks will respond depending on the size of job... So, in London...
    4 Pumps... Stn O (Capt) as IC ADO (Batt Chief) as Monitoring Officer
    6 Pumps...ADO as IC DO (Dep Chief) as Monitoring Officer
    and so on up until over 15 Pumps where an Assistant Commissioner will be the IC and either the Third Officer (senior AC/Chief of Ops) Dep Commissioner or Commissioner will Monitor the job and take over if they feel neccesary but I haven't often known this to happen. Obviously the title 'Commissioner' in London is a reflection of the uniformed Chief of Department and not the type of Commissioner as seen in FDNY

    In the UK we have far fewer resources on the fireground (lack of truck Co's I guess) but have a very formalised system of command and control.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by FFFRED
    FWDbuff

    Don't forget that a "pull box or BARS alarm"...is the dispatcher refering to the old electro-mechanical boxes still found in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island.

    R&R the Box!

    FTM-PTB
    Is everybody up?

    Leave a comment:


  • FFFRED
    replied
    FWDbuff

    Don't forget that a "pull box or BARS alarm"...is the dispatcher refering to the old electro-mechanical boxes still found in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island.

    R&R the Box!

    FTM-PTB

    Leave a comment:


  • firetruckred
    replied
    Thanks Hwoods. I would like to learn more about PG County. I was not aware until recently that they are the second busiest Dept.
    Last edited by firetruckred; 08-24-2006, 01:35 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    And Now.......................

    From the place where it all started:

    P.G.Co. Operates as if all the different VFDs, in and out of the County, are all one big department. Every Station is responsible for everything that it is the closest station to. The second closest station is second due. Third closest...... I think you get the idea. We do NOT allow any political boundaries to interfere with the system. Our "box areas" are usually small, about half of a square mile. the box is numbered with the station number first, then the box number. ie: Box 18-12.

    The assignment for a box is 4 Engines, 2 Trucks, a Squad, and a few chiefs. Upon notification of a "Working Fire" a medic unit and a BLS Ambulance, and a EMS duty officer are added to the box. Additional units may be requested as single units, ( 1 Engine) by a Task Force Assignment, (2 Engines, 1 Truck, and another Chief or two) or by a Second Alarm. The Second Alarm is a mirror of the First Alarm, same amount, and same types, of Equipment. We haven't sent a second alarm on a single family home in at least 15 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • firetruckred
    replied
    Ok, How many thank yous is this??

    Thank you again Buff you are wonderfully resourceful

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    My Department's responses:
    Still alarm/Medical: Engine company
    MVA: Engine and Rescue
    1st alarm: 2 Engines, Rescue, Ladder Caompany, Deputy Chief
    2nd alarm: additional Engine and Ladder, Mutual aid to cover the stations.

    Anything over the 2nd alarm, fire alarm contacts the District 14 mutual aid center; located at Ashland Fire Dispatch. The alarms responses are predetermined for up to 10 alarms. If any more resources are required, the Department of Fire Services activates the Statewide District Mobilization Plan, which also has predetermined task force responses.

    Leave a comment:


  • BPFire1618
    replied
    The city of Danbury, CT which borders me only really has a first-assignment planned out, if they need additional equipment they call for what they want.

    Asst. Chief on duty
    2 paid engines
    1 paid truck
    1 volunteer engine
    1 volunteer engine -OR- squad (light + air)

    My department doesn't really use alarm assignments, we just tone for what we need.

    Leave a comment:


  • phyrngn
    replied
    Alarms

    With my VFD, we currently call for specific equipment--IE Mutual Aid XX Department for tankers and manpower, XX Department for their Aerial, etc. It is a pain in the *** and requires too much thought. I'm in the process of coming up with a "Box Alarm" system that automatically calls certain resources for working fires. I've also heard of some departments having a predesignated "Tanker Task Force" of 5-10 tankers that respond to rural calls when a working fire dispatch is called. We're looking at that, too. We want to use the right department resource for the right job.

    Another good resource for you might be www.MABAS.org. IL and WI have this system worked out for mutual aid, and it is very extensive and very well thought out. I remember Goldfeder talking about it during one of his podcasts.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by firetruckred
    I am interested in the history of the FDNY and how it functions today. If any of you can or would like to share any information that you feel would be helpful such as websites, books, stories of your own, that would great (Yes I have looked at the NY threads on FH.)
    Great resources about FDNY:

    FDNY OPERATIONAL REFERENCE, 6th ed. (9/2005), Jim Griffiths. An excellent reference about everyday operations, SOP/SOG's and almost anything else you could possibly want to know about FDNY. Highly reccomended and worth every penny of the $30 cost if you are an FDNY Buff.

    FDNY AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, NYC Fire Museum, 2003. A great historical reference.

    For a taste of the "War Years" of the late 60's and early 70's, a MUST READ is "Report from Engine Company 82" By Dennis Smith

    Some good websites:
    www.fdnewyork.com, By Frank Raffa, a supervising dispatcher in Brooklyn

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/fdny/html/home2.shtml the official dept website

    www.nyfd.com an unofficial website by a retired member

    Leave a comment:


  • firetruckred
    replied
    That's neat about the automatic coverage FWDbuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by angfireman
    We call asking for Mutual Aid from XX Department for xx piece of equipment, manpower, stage at station, etc. We don't use box alarms up here, unless they do in the big city.

    Hope this helps.
    Thats the great thing about Box Cards......The IC doesnt have to know specifically what departments have what resources (although it certainly helps to know what toys the neighbor has....) All the IC has to do is say "Dispatch, send me the next two engines...." or "Dispatch, send me the next due Rescue Company......" or "Give me the third alarm."

    Also, should there be a large-scale incident of some type, such as a very large building fire, or perhaps a Mass-Casualty Incident, Box Cards are of immense help in that they already have pre-determined "move-up" or "cover" companies already established, making sure no one area is completely stripped of coverage. If Engine 4 is due on the box for box 123, Engine 12 frrom the other side of town automatically moves to their quarters if it is a working fire.

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X