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  • #31
    And.............

    Bones has pretty well summed it up for us too. We ran a Tower Ladder from 1970 until 3 months ago. We started with a 1970 Sutphen, which we used until we wore it out and sold it to Honey Creek, Indiana in 1991, we then accepted a Seagrave Apollo 105' Tower, purchased by our County government, for our use. The Seagrave had been one problem after another until it was taken out of service permanently in April of this year. HOWEVER, we still do Truck work anyway, and I have some folks that are damned good at it. A few weeks back we had a job, and the first truck arrived to find ladders already thrown, Vent work well under way, and the utilities secured. The Truckies arrived on our Heavy Rescue (we call them "Squads") and went to work, with no problems at all. Having a Truck is necessary if you are providing an elevated master stream, but all other Truck duties can be handled by a good crew without the Vehicle.
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

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    • #32
      Originally posted by hwoods
      Bones has pretty well summed it up for us too. We ran a Tower Ladder from 1970 until 3 months ago. We started with a 1970 Sutphen, which we used until we wore it out and sold it to Honey Creek, Indiana in 1991, we then accepted a Seagrave Apollo 105' Tower, purchased by our County government, for our use. The Seagrave had been one problem after another until it was taken out of service permanently in April of this year. HOWEVER, we still do Truck work anyway, and I have some folks that are damned good at it. A few weeks back we had a job, and the first truck arrived to find ladders already thrown, Vent work well under way, and the utilities secured. The Truckies arrived on our Heavy Rescue (we call them "Squads") and went to work, with no problems at all. Having a Truck is necessary if you are providing an elevated master stream, but all other Truck duties can be handled by a good crew without the Vehicle.
      That was the first thing the instructors said when I took my truck company operations class at my county training center (State certified class). They asked what guys there belonged to companies or departments with trucks and only about half of us did. I think it's a great idea for anyone who does not own a truck or does not train regularly doing "truck work" to do so. I applaud all those "engineman" who train on the truck, and the truckies who train with the engine. The only thing that can happen is you are a better firefighter.

      Now that doesn't mean that I won't take part in the ribbing of course

      The essential tasks on a fireground must be completed regardless of what apparatus may or may not be on scene. In my department we have 3 engines and a truck. Often times when a job is large enough, it requires more than just the manpower on our truck on arrival, so one of the other engine companies that is coming in (usually the third due) will assume truck responsibilities. Heck, the one engine tends to be third due to a lot of our calls and nicknamed themselves the squad company of our department.
      9/11/01 D.C. Joseph "Uncle Joe" Marchbanks
      Battalion 12
      Heaven In Harlem

      Tim
      CFD #143

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      • #33
        I've been a "knuckledragger"(Engineman)for most of my career.That does not preclude the fact of being fully knowledgeable and capable of doing good truck work,something that I've done numerous times as the need arose.Like Ken,I'm also a Chief officer and I've lost neither my balls nor my seat.Our personnel come first,and anyone who's followed the recent changes we've endured knows that.Do more with less? Yep,suck it up and get used to it.With families working two people and two or more jobs,help is getting harder and harder to come by.Couple that to employers not allowing FF staff to leave and one can certainly see the reasoning behind automatic aid.And FF's are not the only ones suffering from the decreases it affects the officers too.At a recent structure fire a choice was made in water supply to supply the attack Engine with a portable from the lake(200 ft away) rather than lay a half a mile of hose to the boat launch.The attending Chief took a look at the existing manpower pool and concluded that the portable would supply sufficent water for the job without further tiring an already beat first in crew.The incoming second alarm personnel finished up and were spared the labor of picking up a half mile of LDH. T,C.

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        • #34
          Rescue101,

          Maybe I'm wrong but aren't the knuckle draggers the truck guys ? Stories have it that the term knuckle dragger relates to the primate and / or neanderthawl type meaning that those in that capacity walk through walls, bust windows {with out checking to see if it's locked or not} work above the fire without water protection, and pull victims out of a structure by dragging thier pray simular to a primate.

          I herd that story more than once over the years but like In said I could be mis-lead.

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          • #35
            I think it depends on geography.Up here they were engine guys 'cause you dragged your knuckles off humping line.We refer to the truckies as Mongo,for your listed reasons. T.C.

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