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    Another tidbit from SafetyXchange.com (especially considering our current climactic conditions here in the Eastern US):

    CHRONICLE OF A PREVENTABLE DEATH

    Heat Stress & the Importance of Training By Glenn Demby

    It's hot out there, folks. Hopefully, all of you have trained your workers on the dangers of heat stress including how to recognize and react to the symptoms of various heat-related illnesses. If you haven't, you're putting your workers' lives in jeopardy.

    This is not hyperbole. Here's an example how a company's failure to provide education about heat stress directly contributed to a worker's tragic death.

    The Story Begins

    The story begins in Newfoundland in the spring of 1992. Anthony Dalton and Ronald Morrissey are trained boilermakers and good friends. They decide to take a job in New Brunswick repairing pipes in a paper mill. Here's a chronicle of what happened next:

    May 20, 1992

    Dalton and Morrissey report for their first day of work. The temperatures outside are high for May — 22° C and 35% humidity. It's even hotter in the mill where chemicals are heated in enclosed spaces — especially on the scaffolds where Dalton and Morrissey are working. Nobody tells them anything about the dangers of heat stress. Later, the contractor will testify that he assumed that trained boilermakers would know all about heat stress. It turns out to be a tragically flawed assumption.

    Dalton and Morrissey work all day in the heat. Dalton starts experiencing fatigue. It's the first warning sign. But since neither man knows anything about the signs of heat stress, it goes unrecognized.

    May 21, 1992

    The outdoor temperature has climbed to 28.5° C. Humidity is at 33%. The heat and hard work in the mill continue. Dalton and Morrissey work the entire day. Dalton is getting worse. When the two get back to their motel after work, Dalton starts experiencing muscle cramps. He's exhausted. He passes out on the bathroom floor of the motel room. He drinks a beer, not realizing that the last thing somebody in his condition should do is drink alcohol.

    May 22, 1992

    It's even hotter today — 30.5° C. Dalton is still exhausted but decides to drag himself to work. He spends the morning inside one of the tanks helping to build a scaffold. He's in big trouble. After afternoon break, he tells the supervisor that he's just too exhausted to go back to work. He sits on the floor with his back against the base of a column. When the shift ends, he can barely stand up. He's incoherent. He stumbles about 100 metres and finally collapses. Even now, nobody knows what's wrong. The ambulance takes Dalton to the hospital. But it's too late. Dalton dies of heat stroke the next day.

    The Moral

    Perhaps the saddest part of the death of Anthony Dalton is that it could have been prevented. There was ample warning: Dalton's fatigue, the cramps, his passing out on the bathroom floor, etc. Anybody attuned to the signs of heat stress would have recognized what was going on and acted while there was still time. Tragically, because none of the workers or supervisors with whom Dalton worked had received any education on heat stress, every opportunity to save him was missed.

    NOTE: This story is reprinted from Bongarde Media's newsletter, Safety Compliance Insider, Vol. 2, No. 6, page 7.

    Author Biography - Jim Montanaro

    Jim Montanaro has worked in a metalworking mfg business environment for 30 years in various capacities including Production Control, Mfg, Quality Control, Lean Mfg, Projects & Planning, and Safety and currently works as Lean Mfg/Safety Manager at Tecomet, a subsidiary of Viasys Healthcare Orthopedics, where he has been for the past 25 years. Tecomet has been a supplier of precision mfg technologies and assembly services for over 40 years with applications world wide in the orthopedics, aerospace, military, defense, and communications industries. (www.tecomet.com)


    Jim Montanaro
    Lean Mfg/Safety Manager
    Viasys Healthcare — Tecomet Subsidiary
    115 Eames St.
    Wilmington, MA 01887
    (978) 642-2410


    Around this time and periodically through till about mid 1997 even the Army was experiencing heat related emergencies, with the death of at least 4 Infantry Recruits during that time.

    Take care 'n Stay safe if you're working outside in this wonderfully hot weather.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  • #2
    Drink lots & lots of water.

    Local station did a story on a roofing crew. The gentleman interviewed, stated that he'd drank several quarts of water in the morning, and never once had to use the restroom...

    Stay hydrated y'all !
    I.A.C.O.J. "The Cork"

    Comment


    • #3
      When itt's 95 degrees ..in ain't the time to be macho.

      The culture may pressure you to keep going, but be smart. Do what YOU need to do to keep YOU safe.
      Train to fight the fires you fight.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LaFireEducator
        When itt's 95 degrees ..in ain't the time to be macho.

        The culture may pressure you to keep going, but be smart. Do what YOU need to do to keep YOU safe.
        And Dats A Fact Jack! I just got back from a CPAT training session. About 1/2 way through the run I chose to drop out. One of the instructors came up and asked if I was ok. I was doing good, but like I told him, "The army taught me to be crazy, but not stupid crazy."

        I dont think he knew how to take that one, so he just kinda wandered off. I fell back to one of my running mates who had already dropped back and we ran rest of the way, together.
        If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

        "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

        "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

        Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

        impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

        IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

        Comment


        • #5
          Anyone have more on this one? **had to put it here because of firewall/posting problems - STILL**

          House Explosion Injures At Least 13 Firefighters

          POSTED: 2:18 am EDT August 3, 2006
          UPDATED: 2:25 am EDT August 3, 2006

          Email This Story | Print This Story
          Sign Up for Breaking News Alerts


          SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Fire investigators in suburban Syracuse, N.Y., are trying to determine the cause of a house explosion that injured at least 13 firefighters.

          The building in Constantia blew up Wednesday night while crews were battling a fire.

          The Syracuse Post-Standard reports one firefighter was blasted through a door. Two others rolled from a window and a fourth was stuck beneath a fallen wall.


          The paper quotes a neighbor as saying he helped a firefighter whose mustache had melted.

          The homeowner was not injured.

          Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press
          If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

          "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

          "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

          Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

          impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

          IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

          Comment

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