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Class A foam....when to use it?

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  • #61
    Thanks ChicagoFF,

    I'm am looking forward to what you find out.

    FyredUp
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    • #62
      Your welcome, just tryin to help.

      I wish I could see your reaction when you see a real CAFS discharge instead of 3/4 inch garden hoses and bubble cups And I was speaking about the nozzles and not venturi inductors. You will probably have to unlearn a lot of your previous foam education to ever appreciate CAFS and how to use class A foam.

      And you are not alone, there are a bunch of very professional fire fighters that are just as confussed about class A foam.

      Heck! I learn more about it everyday, and it just keeps gettin better. Sorry for the "drink it comment" it tastes terrible.
      Mark Cummins

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      • #63
        cfire3...

        Your assumption that I have no real world experience with CAFs is flawed. I may not have as much experience as you but I have used it. I have used it at structural training fires and I have seen it work it's magic as an exposure protection tool. I have seen it used to build a fire break in wildland scenarios.

        I believe there is a use for CAFs. Do I believe it's use is as wide spread as you do? Nope.

        Thanks for finally giving me some useful info.

        FyredUp
        Crazy, but that's how it goes
        Millions of people living as foes
        Maybe it's not too late
        To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

        Comment


        • #64
          I've enjoyed your posts Mark (and dare I say Fyred Up) in this thread. I appreciate both your views and welcome your informative contributions. I do believe that CAFS is closely linked with Class A additives as a fire suppression option merely from the perspective of alternatives to water. Whilst some may have already formed opinions as to which way they might choose to go there are many others who haven't.

          I'm glad you can still exchange views with useful debate and opinions.

          Thanks.
          Euro Firefighter 2008 - Strategy & Tactics from the World's Firegrounds

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by FyredUp
            cfire3...

            Your assumption that I have no real world experience with CAFs is flawed. I may not have as much experience as you but I have used it. I have used it at structural training fires and I have seen it work it's magic as an exposure protection tool. I have seen it used to build a fire break in wildland scenarios.

            I believe there is a use for CAFs. Do I believe it's use is as wide spread as you do? Nope.

            Thanks for finally giving me some useful info.

            FyredUp
            Hey! Fyredup, that's good to hear, thanks, and I have enjoyed the heated debate challenge. You'er good.
            Mark Cummins

            Comment


            • #66
              Just an update...

              7 years later we are still using our Class A foam system. We have changed from a strictly Class A agent to a multipurpose one FireAde. While it works fine for our Class A use it is far more expensive than simple Class A foam. It does have the added benefit of being able to be used for Class B fires by changing the percentage rate of foam.

              We have used the Class A foam successfully during fire attack at a .3% foam rate. We have used aerating nozzles and bumped the percentage for burying brush piles and for overhaul.

              So far we haven't destroyed the environment, burned down our community, or been overrun by citizens clamoring for us to spend $50K for a cafs system.

              Again, if cafs is your thing, more power to you!!
              Crazy, but that's how it goes
              Millions of people living as foes
              Maybe it's not too late
              To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

              Comment


              • #67
                My volunteer department took delivery of a new engine with an around the pump foam system and a 15 gallon foam cell about 4 months ago.

                I was placed on charge of selecting the foam and developing the foam SOPs.

                Likr Fryred's department, we use Class A/B FireAid. There was much research and discussion on this. We went with the FireAid, despite the cost for two reasons. The first was that we over about 14 miles of interstate, and with that comes the possibility of a Class A/B fire. the second reason had to do with the fact that the Class B we currently have is rarely used, and ends up expiring on the truck and on the shelf. By using FireAid, we will rotate the foam and eliminate the spoilage issue.

                We have determined that we will use foam on every fire, except for our smaller brush fires.
                Train to fight the fires you fight.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
                  My volunteer department took delivery of a new engine with an around the pump foam system and a 15 gallon foam cell about 4 months ago.

                  I was placed on charge of selecting the foam and developing the foam SOPs.

                  Likr Fryred's department, we use Class A/B FireAid. There was much research and discussion on this. We went with the FireAid, despite the cost for two reasons. The first was that we over about 14 miles of interstate, and with that comes the possibility of a Class A/B fire. the second reason had to do with the fact that the Class B we currently have is rarely used, and ends up expiring on the truck and on the shelf. By using FireAid, we will rotate the foam and eliminate the spoilage issue.

                  We have determined that we will use foam on every fire, except for our smaller brush fires.
                  The spoilage is definitely a problem, especially once you open it and it gets exposed to air. I have found that some Class B foam starts gelling after as little as 3 to 6 months. I have had people tell me they pour a layer of vegetable oil over the top of the foam it slows the spoilage. Seems like a hassle to me.
                  Crazy, but that's how it goes
                  Millions of people living as foes
                  Maybe it's not too late
                  To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
                    The spoilage is definitely a problem, especially once you open it and it gets exposed to air. I have found that some Class B foam starts gelling after as little as 3 to 6 months. I have had people tell me they pour a layer of vegetable oil over the top of the foam it slows the spoilage. Seems like a hassle to me.
                    Since we see so few fires, the fires that we have we have decided to use foam on.

                    First of all, it will give the members experience using foam. In addition, using the foam instead of having it sit in the tank will force us to rotate the foam and hopefully reduce the amount of spoiled foam. The fact that it's a combination foam will mean that we will use the same foam on all fires, hopefully increasing the rotation opportunities.

                    Part of the reason we went with the FireAid was to eliminate the A/B decision making process. The pump operator still has to recognize the Class b % and the IC has to recognize a hydrocarbon Class B vs. a Polar Solvent Class B, but it's one less decision they have to make.
                    Train to fight the fires you fight.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      We have put a thin layer of mineral oil in our foam tanks in all our trucks for many years. We rarely/never flow the class B foam, but when it does get used, has remained fine with no gelling.
                      FTM-PTB-RFB
                      IACOJ

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