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  • New WTC Movie

    Did any of you see the previews for the World Trade Center movie. What do you guys think about movies that deal with 9-11.

  • #2
    I saw the trailer for the first time last night..... I have some pretty strong mixed feelings on this one. Not really sure its a good idea, but not really sure its not so bad either. Which means I will likely forego watching it.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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    • #3
      Considering Oliver Stone directed it.
      NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
      IACOJ Attack

      Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

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      • #4
        New WTC Movie

        Yep, Ryan, That's my heartburn too. Maybe if Scorcese or someone else directed it, I might give it a whirl.
        Guess I'll wait until it's on DVD and "Blockbuster" it. That way if it's S&^t, I can just take it back.

        Keep Safe Y'all
        Jimmy
        Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscripti catapultas habebunt. (When catapults are outlawed, only outlaws will have catapults!)

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        • #5
          Whats with the cheesy moustache on Nick Cage?
          I am a complacent liability to the fire service

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          • #6
            good or bad

            It seems that regardless of good intent or just bad judgement Hollywood can't help but make a movie about a subject with emotions involved. My question to Hollywood is, is it about the subject or just the money?

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            • #7
              LV, that was about my feelings on it too.
              If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

              "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

              "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

              Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

              impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

              IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am going to see it. This is no different then war movies coming out while the war is still going on. If anything I will go see it to pick it apart where they screw up.
                ******=================
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                ------GOD BLESS AMERICA ! ------

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lvwrench
                  It seems that regardless of good intent or just bad judgement Hollywood can't help but make a movie about a subject with emotions involved. My question to Hollywood is, is it about the subject or just the money?
                  MONEY!! Plain and simple....

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                  • #10
                    World Trade Center


                    Considering it is based on a true story, and that the two main "characters" survivors it's based off of have given their approval, I will go see it. Check out the website for interviews with the REAL heroes in the "In Their Own Words" section.

                    As for the cheesy moustache, John McLoughlin (the person he plays) has a moustache...so Cage grew one as well. Part of the character, I guess.

                    I wouldn't condemn it without seeing it based solely on who the director happens to be. Investigate it first, and then either accept of reject it based on what you've found...rather than petty predjudices.

                    Just my opinion. Stay safe!
                    Last edited by Nine3Probie; 07-19-2006, 04:08 PM. Reason: Stupid me forgot to post the link!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RyanEMVFD
                      Considering Oliver Stone directed it.
                      Oh no. Seeing as how 9-11 is the new JFK assassination for conspiracy buffs, this does not bode well...

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                      • #12
                        Not sure if I will see it. I did see the trailer last night at least twice. It's a very hard decision whether or not to go see it since I lived through it.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lvwrench
                          My question to Hollywood is, is it about the subject or just the money?
                          Money. Always was, always will be. Folks in Hollywood may make movies about the evils of capitalism (except for their three picture deal with Paramount), but while ROI (return on investment) means king in french, it IS king in Hollywood.
                          They told me if I voted for Hillary Clinton the president would be emotional, impulsive, and unpredictable. They were right. I voted for Hillary Clinton and got a president that is emotional, impulsive, and unpredictable.

                          I'm not saying you're stupid. I'm saying you have bad luck when it comes to thinking.

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                          • #14
                            This may address some concerns expressed in previous posts.

                            Originally posted by Toronto Star, 18 July 2006
                            Oliver Stone on 9/11
                            Survivors are the focus of 'World Trade Center'
                            Emergency workers help `true to life' depiction
                            Jul. 18, 2006. 06:32 AM
                            MURRAY WHYTE
                            ENTERTAINMENT REPORTER

                            Of the many qualities ascribed to Oliver Stone in his 30-plus years of filmmaking, "understated'' has rarely been one of them.

                            So it was with unexpected restraint that Stone, in a pink dress shirt and khaki summer suit, appeared before a small audience at Toronto's Varsity Theatres Sunday night to introduce a closed screening of his latest opus. World Trade Center is a big-budget, Hollywood treatment of the most horrific 24-hour span in recent American history: the destruction of the twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001 by terrorist-hijacked planes.

                            "Listen, 9/11 comes with a lot of baggage," said Stone, who stayed in town yesterday for a round of promotional press for the film, due out Aug. 9. He was at once weary, self-effacing and fretful. "All we wanted to do here is get down and make a movie that was as realistic and true to life as possible."

                            You'd be forgiven if you were to take those comments with a grain of salt. Stone's career is sprinkled liberally with heavy-handed bluster: Natural Born Killers (1994), for example, a litany of extreme violence intended as critique of the mainstream media's fascination with criminal brutality, remains one of filmmaking's most divisive examples of artistic licence bombastically applied. Or JFK, his 1991 unravelling of a favourite conspiracy theory regarding the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

                            So when Scott Strauss, an Emergency Service Unit officer with the New York Police Department, first got the call from Stone's people to act as a consultant on the film, his response was quick.

                            "I didn't want to do it. It was a bad day. I didn't think it was something that should be made into a movie at the time," he said. "I was afraid it would be Hollywood-ized, and made into something silly."

                            Strauss spent all of that fateful day at Ground Zero, combing through the smouldering wreckage. "We were walking around, all day long, looking for survivors and there weren't any," he said.

                            In the end, only 20 of the thousands inside would be taken out alive. Two of them, Will Jimeno and John McLoughlin, became the focus of World Trade Center. The films revolves around their experience buried under the smoking rubble for nearly 24 hours.

                            Strauss was the first one down the deep, tangled pit of wreckage where they lay pinned by rubble. He reached Jimeno first, cutting him free and sending him to the surface.

                            Strauss's experience was vital to Stone's goal of veracity. After some coaxing from friends — "My partner said `You know, they're going to make this movie with or without you; you may as well do what you can to make this accurate" — he met Stone.

                            He described it as awkward at best. "I was a little nervous: You know, Oliver Stone, his whole conspiracy theories and stuff. I thought, `Oh, no, this is going to be bad.'"

                            All of which, of course, does little to explain Strauss sitting here with actor Michael Pena, who plays Jimeno, in the Four Seasons Hotel in Yorkville yesterday in a crisply pressed blue shirt and tie, obligingly offering himself to the press as part of the movie's promotional circuit. ("I don't know if I'll ever get used to this," he said.)

                            Early on, grudgingly, he decided to give it a try, joining Jimeno and McLoughlin as consultants. Not long after going to the California set, he argued with Stone on details. The director was open and compliant.

                            "Oliver and me, we had our battles, yeah. Some I won, some I lost," he said. "But he took it in stride. He really is a great guy. He had his heart in the right place, all the way through."

                            Strauss had his concerns assuaged, but he wasn't the only one with misgivings. Since its beginnings, World Trade Center has been plagued with unrest: Victims' families accused Stone of looking to cash in on the tragedy; other relatives were angered by not being involved; others were simply horrified at the dead not being left to rest.

                            Among many brutal, graphic scenes, the film depicts the grisly death of Dominick Peluzzo, one of the officers trapped with Jimeno and McLoughlin. "My thing is: this man died for you," his widow, Jeanette, told the Seattle Times. "How do you do this to this family?"

                            World Trade Center, of course, is not the first film to be made of the tragedy. A collection of shorts by renowned international directors about the day — 11.09.01 — was presented at the Toronto Film Festival in 2002, but never found a North American distributor. More recently, United 93, about the hijacked flight destined for the White House that was diverted by a passenger uprising to crash in a Pennsylvania field, was critically lauded but failed to draw audiences.
                            But World Trade Center is the first with the full might of a Hollywood studio's promotional budget behind it — and the first to extract an intensely personal character-driven story literally from beneath the wreckage, where more than 2,200 people died that day.

                            The story, of Jimeno and McLoughlin's survival, is ultimately one of redemption. But whether audiences can reconcile the horror of the event with the deeply personal, emotional story that lies within remains to be seen. United 93's commercial failure weighs heavily on Stone.

                            "We may have the same problem," he said. "That's why we made the budget as tight as we could."

                            Those worries are not for Strauss to contemplate. After so much angst — to get involved or not — his worries are quelled by what he sees on screen and what he helped to create.

                            "If we weren't there, it would have been a completely different movie," he said. "I just realized: `I have one shot at this ... to pay tribute to my co-workers and the people that died that day, civilians and rescue workers alike.' I had one shot at this and I wanted to do it right."
                            From a Toronto Star article.

                            Stay safe!
                            Last edited by Nine3Probie; 07-19-2006, 06:41 PM.

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                            • #15
                              I think it may be too soon for such a movie but I would like to see it. I was definately affected by 9-11, not directly but living in the northeast and going to New York many times I simply could not get over that hole in the skyline and all those poor soles and lost brothers and sisters. I am torn over seeing it. My feer is that I will almost be entertained by the movie, you know, I dont want to feel like wow that was a great movie when its about something so horrible but I mean Saving Private Ryan was a great movie and look at what its about. There are many movies about tragic events that do a great job of telling the story and educating. I guess I will just have to see it and come to my own conclusions.

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