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  • SpartanGuy
    replied
    Another good winter-time use for quartz lights:

    Put some on your patients in vehicle rescues. I know it's bright as hell, but it help keeps them warm. Be sure to cover them with lots of heavy blankets. We also carry some extra ski-caps and some extra pairs of those cheaper knitted gloves that you can get at the store to use on patients wherever possible. Anything to help keep em warm, since most people don't drive in their full winter get-up.

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  • 42VTExplorer
    replied
    PS ... Don't let the LA fool ya ... northern boy born and raised.
    Damn well better be!

    Sorry for not being around if you called...Family decided ''Were going on vacation...To Denmark!''

    I'll be home on Thursday, will you still be around then?

    Leave a comment:


  • LaFireEducator
    replied
    Here is a tip that I have used in the past for the SCBA masks .... wash them with everyday dish or hand soap .... rinse gently with COLD water and allow to air dry which leaves a very thin film on the lenses and really does help prevent the lense from fogging. This si something I learned long ago while skiing competitivly as I used to use it on my glasses and ski goggles.
    Here is another personal tip and this one is gonna sound very strange, but it works. Before ya put your socks on, wipe your foot with some anti-persperaint. It slows down the sweating process, which keeps your socks drier and in turn, keeps your feet warmer since the drier socks wicks away less heat from the foot. It does make a difference during those extended operations.
    PS ... Don't let the LA fool ya ... northern boy born and raised.

    Leave a comment:


  • arhaney
    replied
    Thanks, Weruj1. Atleast I didn't beat a dead horse (perhaps just a pony) That second link was funny.....LMAO. I noticed that the thread from 2001 had very few people that are still around today on the forums.

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  • Weruj1
    replied
    WOW .............these are all I could find !

    http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...ghlight=winter

    http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...ghlight=winter

    Leave a comment:


  • LeuitEFDems
    replied
    If it's a cold day and the road that your on with the trucks turns to ice, and happens to be on a hill (this is from personal experience), 1st, make sure the darned truck won't slide...we ended up chocking all the wheels...and ended up using the "dead" hoselines that were laying on the ground as a way to pull ourselves up the hill. worked out great. just grab onto the hose and do a hand over hand method to slide/walk your way up the sheet of ice. The guys down below were looking at us like we're crazy (not the 1st time that night at the fire) but when they tryed walking up the hill, the 1st thing they did was grab the hose.

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  • arhaney
    replied
    Excellent thread guys, lots of good ideas! I hope we don't have to use them over the next couple of days.

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  • 42VTExplorer
    replied
    Another couple tips;

    Use the exhaust to thaw frozen fittings, nozzles, etc.

    If we're on scene for a long amount of time, we try to run all the gas or diesel engines that we have there to keep them from staying cold. Doesn't matter whether it's a generator or a chainsaw..We try to start everything and run everything for a short time just in case we need it.

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  • toddman
    replied
    Yes, the quartz hallogen light thing actually does work. Those things get hot, go turn one on and put your hand about six inches away from it.

    A couple more little tricks: have isopropal alcohol (gas line antifreeze)and or WD-40 stored in the cab (or somewhere warm) works good for couplings and nozzles. Be careful around fire with this stuff.

    Another thing to keep in mind; if you are using PPV on a structure/house and the damage is minimal don't freeze up the plumbing by letting the fan run for longer than needed. But, as always, keep FF safety in mind. One other note about PPV during the cold...the fan may try to slide away from where you placed it...ice. If this happens...you just found another use for wheel chocks or the halligan tool.

    Leave a comment:


  • stm4710
    replied
    The following came from a war story, not my expierience:

    Make sure you keep the the fittings your carry on the tailboard or outside the truck in the OPEN position. I guess what happend was they had a gated wye attached to the rear tailboard. After they washed the appartaus they got a call and it was filled with water and froze on the way to the call.

    If you wash the appartaus ,you should take a towel and dry the rubber seal on the side doors. I guess after you wash it, water hangs out in there for a while and will freeze on the way to a call. The guy said it wasnt so much hard.....a good tug will open it but it tears off the rubber seal.
    Last edited by stm4710; 12-24-2004, 02:25 AM.

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  • RLFD14
    replied
    Don't wash the truck right after returning to quarters, the water will freeze to all metal body surfaces in sheets. No fun having glaze ice on the diamond plated footholds, and compartment doors and handles frozen shut. Live with the dirt for a few hours, or run hot water through your garden hose if you really can't wait - even then you'd need to run a lot of it to warm up the body above freezing where I live.

    Leave a comment:


  • ROOKIELZ
    replied
    The reason I am asking is because I suggested this once and got tromped on HARD. The main message (and a valid one) was never do anything to your mask that may affect it's operation or the warranty. The only thing I could do for the guys once they frosted up was hold them over the truck's defrost system. It was time-consuming and I would like a better system for "the boys."

    Leave a comment:


  • npfd801
    replied
    We've always had a tub of oil dry and salt mixed for winter use. Works well for when we have to get a person on a cot down a slippery sidewalk or something similar, and the county highway department doesn't seem to mind us "borrowing" their salt.

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  • RLFD14
    replied
    Originally posted by ROOKIELZ
    --Would antifreeze void the warranty if something happened to the mask?
    That is a VERY good question..... it works for us, but I will have to change my official position on this to "try at your own risk". Auto antifreeze doesn't seem to hurt rubber coolant hoses in cars, but I am no chemist, either. I also failed to specify that you should apply the antifreeze only to the inside glass, not all over.
    Last edited by RLFD14; 12-24-2004, 01:29 AM.

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  • ROOKIELZ
    replied
    Good thread; I have learned a few things tonight. Thanks,people

    I have found that oil-dry ("kitty litter") is a better instantaneous anti-slip solution, since fresh rock salt on ice can be kind of like walking on marbles sometimes
    Gonna try that one, for sure.

    Another good heat source for thawing something out is quartz hallogen lights.
    Does that really work or are you pulling my boot?

    Wipe a napkin or kleenex damp (not soaked!) with antifreeze on the inside of the SCBA mask before donning, and it will help prevent (or at least delay) a glaze from forming inside the glass from your breath and evaporated facial sweat.
    --Would antifreeze void the warranty if something happened to the mask?

    Leave a comment:

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