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Calls that gave you chills?

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  • #16
    I would like to hear from anyone in the Scranton/Wilkes Barre (Pa) area who was on the call when Hyattsville rolled their tiller truck. What was that like for you?

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    • #17
      About 9 months ago we had a mutual aid call for a rollover with 4 victims. I was the first truck from our department out and pulled up to the scene to see one of my sister's best friends car on its hood and could not remember if she was at my parents house when I left there for the page. The 10 minutes it took to find out who the victims were, were the worst in my 10 years of service so far.

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      • #18
        Well guys this is the worst one for me. (sorry it's a little long and drawn out, but with out the details it won't mean as much) This happened about 4 years ago. I was in a different department, same county but other end of it. I was still living at home then also. My stepdad (who is a capt. in that dept) and I were walking out the door to go to the funeral of a firefighter (police officer by profession) from a neighboring dept who had committed suicide suddenly. Our dept got toned out for a sturcture fire, knowing that everyone else would be at the funeral, and feeling that he would rather us be fighting fire that attending his funeral anyway, we decided to respond to the fire. We lived farther from the station than anyone else in our dept so it was a bad feeling to start when we picked up the first truck from our dept, knowing we would be short handed. The second due company arrived first and advised that the structure was fully involved, roof already colapsed. We arrived and they had lines off their trucks, so I left my stepdad with our truck and went to see what I could do on the fire ground. The house was on the ground so we they were just keeping the propane tanks cool,and putting out what they could, and trying to get a water supply established. I went back up the hill(the house was at the bottom of a hill with muddy road only one of the trucks could get down, the droptank and a pumper were at the top) to help with water supply. A third company had been called and responded with a tanker. The driver was unfamiliar with the area so I rode with him to show him where the hydrant was. We refilled and headed back to the scene. I got back on the our truck with my stepdad at the scene and a firefighter from the 2nd due got in the other truck. They left for the hydrant first. My stepdad and I met on the road as we were going to the hydrant and they were returning to the scene. We filled up and headed back. About then our dept got paged for a MVA on the road we were on. At first I figured it was on the opposite end from where we were. But as we approached the fire scene we came up a blind curve. I remember seeing a busted hose appliance laying the road, then broken red warning light, then a mangled ladder, this all seemed to go in slow motion as we rounded the curve. And when every thing was in plain view, there was debris and water all over the roadway,a tanker upside down off the road, and two firefighters laying in the roadway. For those of you who have not seen this sight (I certianly hope none of you ever do) this is the most chilling thing you can ever see as a firefighter or emt. I advised dispatch that we were on the scene of the accident and it was involving the 3rd due's fire truck, then i'm not sure where i threw my portable radio as i jumped out a ran to the first firefighter, he said "check the driver out first, he's bad". Another member had approached from the opposite end and gotten to him first, he just looked and me and shook his head, the driver was gone. He had been ejected and the truck rolled over his face. I returned to the passenger, I know him well, he was only 17. He was conscious, he had already gotten out of his turnout gear, and was laying shivering soaking wet, where the water had dumped out of the truck. He said the he too had been ejected, he remembered seeing tree tops, and thought his back was broken. (he ended up with a broken pelvis) I held c-spine and talked to him and assisted packing him. Then placed him in the ambulance when it arrived. Everyone on scene was visibly devistated, my stepdad worst of all. The magnitude of the whole thing didn't hit me until a few hours later(i guess training and instinct overrode my emotions long enuff to get the job done). It was bad enough for everyone involved. But if the wreck had happened 15 minutes earlier, 1 trip earlier, that would have been me all busted up, or even worse. This will really make you think,about why not you, about that someone up there is looking out for you, that you must have some purpose in life. I read it that mine was to help people, and fire/rescue is my means to help. The most chilling thing has to be this: The driver of the tanker who died was the first on the scene of the other firefighter's suicide. He too had been on the way to the funeral when the call came out. When I was in the truck with him, we were talking about it and he said "I'd rather be out on a fire call that at a funeral any day". Three days later, we were all at HIS funeral. His radio number was retired after that and since then I've worn it on the helmets that I've had, and will always wear it on my helmets as long as I'm doing this stuff. Everybody please be careful and stay safe! This doesn't need to happen to any more of us.

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        • #19
          One day ealry in the summer of 2000, i cant remember exactly when it was, we were toned out to a working structure fire, just west of our station. We were the first engine on the scene, and quickly set up for an interior attack. The house was built tight, and very little smoke was escaping, and of couse, it had not vented itself yet. As we forced the door, i feared that it would backdraft, but luckily it did not and only turned out to be some papaer burning on the floor. We also found a lit hand torch in the attic. From the get-go the structure had something about it that seemed eerie. After we extinguished the fire Me and another fireman made a primary search of the building. We search the kitchen and the living room of the single floor building first and then mad our way to the bedroom. Upon entering the bedroom we found a body, and at first didn't notice that half of his face was missing because that house was not yet well ventilated, but with a closer veiw we noticed the 12 guage shotgun and the blood splatter across the adjacent wall. We immediatly exited the structure and reported what we found to the OIC. It seemed like every Law enforcement officer in the county was there within 5 minutes. We never found out exactly what the sheriff's conclusion was, but the best that i can figure is that that guy set his house on fire, and shot himself. I guess he was going to use the fire to cover everything up. It turned out that i had met the guy before and he had been a roomate of a cousin of mine. I think about finding another site like that every time I enter a structure fire, it seems like it is always in the back of my mind.

          Another call that I will always remember is a First Responder call that we recieved about the same time period, It came out as a pediatric Code Blue, and of course anything involving children sends chills down your spine automatically. I was second on the scene, and we found a 8 month old child that had been deceased for several hours. It was bone chilling to find a human that had only been ion this world a short amount of time laying there in his crib, completely lifeless. Sometimes stuff like that almost makes you want to cry.

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