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  • mailbox fires procedure

    is there any written procedures regarding extinguishing mail box fires we have a disagreement dry chem or CO2

  • #2
    Signal 50, Structure Fire. 123 North Street. Reported as Heavy smoke and fire showing from all levels. Exposure to nearby brush and ajoining newspaper box. Called in by a neigbbor reporting the days mail still inside.

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    • #3
      -------Wow that was real helpful in answering the question that was asked.------- Since mail is a class A fire and you don't want to use water go with an ABC extinguisher.

      ------------------
      The statements above are my own opinions

      FF Greg Grudzinski
      Oaklyn Fire Dept.
      Station 18-3

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      • #4
        thanks for the help but is there any written text on it i remember seeing something in a postal publication any info on where it might be

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        • #5
          Our policies state CO2 for extinguishment. Even though it's not really rated for Class A fires, CO2 will work because the mailbox is enclosed. Our policy also requires that we notify the postal inspector/USPSPD.

          ------------------
          Be safe.

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          • #6
            THING ABOUT CO2 is that it really doesnt put out the fire as sort,yes it will go out but as compared to dry chem which will adhere to the material,mail, and put it out

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            • #7
              I know the USPS prefers you use ABC powder, Purple K, or any other type of DRY agent- [email protected] is not preferred as it can leave moisture inside the box and damage the mail. Also, they prefer you do NOT force entry unless ABOLUTELY necessary, such as smoke keeps coming out after repeated attempts to blow agent inside the box.

              ------------------
              "Loyalty above all else, except honor."

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              • #8
                I asked the local Postmaster (my fiancee)and she is going to look it up. She said the best thing to do is to put out the fire and try not damage the mail any further, then call the Postmaster so the Postal Inspectors can be notified.

                Once the investigation is done, the mail will still be delivered if it is to where the address can be read.

                Ed Brando

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                [This message has been edited by emsbrando (edited 01-27-2001).]

                [This message has been edited by emsbrando (edited 01-27-2001).]

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                • #9
                  One thing everyone is forgetting to mention is "how did the fire in the mailbox start in the first place?" Are you dealing with someone who used the mailbox as an ashtray or are you dealing with a possible hazmat or even terrorist incident?

                  The color of the smoke coming from the mailbox may be an indication of what's burning inside....maybe not!

                  The safety of our personnel should come first, not the preservation of the mail!
                  God only knows what people put into the mailbox! Full PPE should be worn, the fire extinguished and then let the postal inspectors take over!

                  ------------------
                  And on the eighth day...God created Firefighters!
                  Captain Gonzo

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                  • #10
                    This is a very wierd post. Who cares what kind of agent you use. If the fire is to the point that you have to use an extinguisher the mail is pretty much screwed. I am with Gonzo. How the hell do you get a mailbox fire in the first place? Is it kids screwing around for fun or is there a device aim to harm emergency personnel? Small incident to draw personnel into a scene. Large incident to take out your people.

                    To answer your question I would use a dry chem because how much does it cost to reservice a dry chem vs. a C02 extinguisher? If I am not mistaken I believe dry chem is cheaper than CO2.

                    Just my thoughts.

                    ------------------
                    Hamy91

                    FIrefighters are the chosen people.
                    _________________________

                    My views do not reflect that of my department or the United States Air Force

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                    • #11
                      How about the deck gun? Or even the aerial master stream?

                      Just kiddin...

                      I guess some form of dry chem. Less damage. Then have the PD secure the scene until Postal Officials can get to the scene.

                      Oh yeah, and when you find the little punks that lit it to begin with, make them wash the firetrucks every week for a year or so (especially handy during parade season). I'm sure they'll agree it's better than their parents finding out. Don't forget the bay floors

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                      Chris
                      Hillcrest FD

                      LEGAL INFO: Any and all views I've expressed above and on this site are not representative of my department. They are my personal opinions and views.

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