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  • Pride373
    replied
    We have an "old-timer" who responds to most calls in his vehicle equipped with a still camera and video camera. His job on the scene is invalubale, as we can critique our fires in "real-time"! We have footage/photos for the last 15 years of every type of incident you can imagine.

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  • Cellblock776
    replied
    I keep a digital camera with me when working. I don't bother with it on scenes until after I've got time after I've done my assignment. On fire scenes that is usually arond the time we start rehabing. I will snap a few pics while sipping water and cooling down. On wrecks I usually get a few good shots of the damaged vehicles after the ambulance has left with any patients as we wait for a wrecker. In our department rescue truck we have a digital camera and a poloroid. We take pics of scenes for our station scrapbook but they aren't seen by insurance agents or the public. I keep a VHS camcorder on the dash of my POV for recording my Code-3 runs. I turn it on in my driveway and record until I get to the station or the scene. It's come in handy when motorists with a grudge against the department have filed false 'reckless operation' reports on us when we respond to calls. The police and fire Chiefs will review my run tape with me and see that I had not 'forced' anyone over or drove crazy. After the cams got me out of a couple of jams our Chief decided that we needed video cams in our Rescue and first out pumper. We experimented with cheap VHS cams but they didn't take the vibrations and beatings that occur inside our trucks so we will be investing in a 'real' system from a police supply vendor.
    Be Safe,

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  • Jay911
    replied
    We carry a digital camera on our rescue truck, and I have a digital video camera which I take to scenes when I can. I get permission from the company officer before I start shooting, and it rarely goes past our department's walls, or, ultimately, our web site. They definitely don't go to any media outlets.

    --j.

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  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain5505
    Hey ElSwappo
    Put the camera in the inside of your jacket and get some good pictures. I haven't seen the inside of a good burner in a long time.
    Well, now that you've got permission from the Captain.......

    Good advice from everyone. YES...Share them with investigators. Let's suppose you're having a series of suspicious fires. Any photos showing flame color, intensity, location and smoke color....many things could be valuable clues. Also, don't be afraid to point the camera AWAY from the flames. Take a few frames of the crowd. WHY you ask?

    Photos of onlookers might show "just who you're looking for."

    Once the investigation commences...Leave it up to them, unless you are requested to assist. If you had taken photos before they arrived...inform them. They'll probably want to take custody of the film.

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  • Sleuth
    replied
    On my Volle Dept we have an older fellow who really wants to help out, but has some "health issues". He is our photographer, uses his own digital camera, makes up prints for our scrap book.

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  • ff7134
    replied
    We have poloroids in the squads. We also have an official photographer who shows up on lot and lots of calls. He is the father of one of our FF and retired so hes around alot. We also have a video camera and recorder mounted on our Command truck we take alot of video and use it for after action and training.

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  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    -- Digital camera in the Rescue. It's a Sony Mavica, so the nice part is we pop out the 3.5" floppy and the Doc at the hospital can pop it into any standard PC and see the photos. And yes, we've done that.

    -- Old Camcorder also kept in the Rescue.

    -- Disposables in several of our "first due" trucks.

    -- I don't take photos of our own incidents since I'm usually "doing." But I have buffed a few fires that were quick & convient for me to get to. I even handed a roll of film over to the State Fire Marshals office for one arson fire in a string of them a neighboring town was experiencing -- I just happened to be driving by and our dispatch center was blowing tones as I was putting the truck in park. Had my camera and got shots of the crowd & the old barn. Wasn't much of anything I could do as an invidual firefighter, but at least I could record the scene for the Fire Marshal.

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  • radioguy
    replied
    I just started keeping one of those waterproof disposables in my gear, it seems like it is a lot more rugged than a standard one. I am not to worried about the investigators, as my assitant chief is also the assisnat fire marshall and handles all the investigations within our district, as long as he gets a copy of all of them he is happy.


    On a related note, our brand new heavy rescue, being used more as a combination service/rescue, has a camera built into the roof that from the officers seat can be swiveld 360 degrees around and move up/down and zoom in, and shows on a color screen in the cab. We are going to pull it down and check and see how difficult it will be to interface it with a recording device, most likely a laptop with a big hard drive dedicated to just recording teh images if it can be done. Should make for some great after action reviews, training films, andstill shots.

    The truck was a demo, so it had every option they offered already on it, I doubt we would ahve every gotten a camera like that otherwise!

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  • AFD368
    replied
    Cameras

    Our Department carries a Poloroid on the Rescue, as the area hospital likes pics of cars involved in MVA's to help in diagnosing possible injuries of the MVA victims.

    We usually also have an older member of our Department who csrries a disposable camera who shows up to the scene(s) of fire incidents.
    I also, sometimes, have my digital camera in my truck, and grab it once in a while if I make the apparatus.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewiston2Capt
    replied
    The chiefs in my FD carry digital cameras in their vehicles, and on our Rescue-engine, and ambulance we have instant cameras. I used to carry a disposable in my gear mostly for the purpose of taking pictures of anything I might see while in the early stages of a fire. I am not to good with descriptions so I thought if I take a pic, those who need to see can see basically what I saw. The reasoning behind the disposable cameras on our rescue and ambulance is for MVAs where we can take pictures of the vehicle and turn them over to the hospital when we bring the patient in. It is easier to hand them pics and say this is how the car looked rather than trying to describe it to a doctor or nurse who may have no idea what you are talking about.

    Leave a comment:


  • ullrichk
    replied
    I can't tell you how many times I've been on a call and wished I'd had a camera. There are all sorts of once-in-a-career events that, properly photographed and documented, would be invaluable for training.

    I still don't carry a camera, but we have waterproof disposables on every engine now.

    Leave a comment:


  • FFEMT284
    replied
    cameras

    We carry a camera on our first due apparatus to take pics and then post them on our webpage as kinda of an action thing and then use the pics in an end of the year slide show. Following hippa completely

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  • GeorgeWendtCFI
    replied
    1. HIPAA probably doesn't apply if it's outside in public.

    2. True story. I am investigating an arson fire at a diner. I see a FF in the turnout gear of the mutual aid co. in my scene taking pictures. He tells me that he taking training photos. OK, I say. The next day, the photos are on the front page of the paper with a description of how the fire was set. He really was a FF, but he neglected to tell me that he was also a press photog. It will never happen to me again. Once I arrive, all cameras are outside the fire lines.

    3. Early photos should be shared with the investigators. Scene photos should not be taken if the fire is going to be investigated.

    4. Don't be afraid to publish the photos. Just make sure your FD knows about it and they have been cleared by the investigators.

    Leave a comment:


  • Weruj1
    replied
    fight the fire .................ditch the camera.......watch out for HIPAA !

    Leave a comment:


  • elswappo
    replied
    Ha,Ha,Ha I hope so!

    Leave a comment:

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