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Wildland: Side Mount Booster reel Vs. Rear mount Booster Reel?

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  • Dickey
    replied
    Our brush rig has a top mounted reel but the nozzle is mounted on the back to be pulled off the back. We also have 3 1" forestry lines preconnected to the pump. These are also deployed off the rear of the vehicle. I think off the rear is more flexible for what you want to do.

    Keep your head down and your powder dry.
    _____________________
    Lt.Jason Knecht
    Altoona Fire Rescue
    Altoona, WI

    Leave a comment:


  • July36
    replied
    ours is mounted on a frame just above the tank and facing rear.So far we have had no probs with it by going side to side with the help of the hose rollers.The ONLY problem weve seen which really isnt a problem is we have to get up onto the back of the truck to either pull the hose or roll the hose back up but i believe we can fix this problem by relocating the electric rewind button and relocating the nozzle a bit more towards the back of the truck.Presently we are using the 3/4" redline(around 250-300 ft) but ive been thinking on going with the new Reeltex type booster line...its much less cumbersome and much more lightweight.
    We also carry about 500 ft of 1" FS hose and about 300 ft of the 3/4" FS type hose.

    Donna C
    Fire Chief
    Bridge Canyon VFD
    http://cms.firehouse.com/dept/SeligmanAZ

    Leave a comment:


  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    My type 6 engine has the reel mounted atop the tank, just behind the cab. It favors the driver's side, however, I find it just as easy to pull off to the right. With the proper hose guides mounted...it's not difficult to go to the right, left or rear of the engine.

    Six of one...half dozen of the other?

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Different Strokes.......

    In the Mid-Atlantic, (if the rain ever stops) our fires are usually in Heavily Wooded settings, quite often a rig will get into a position and stay put for the duration. We often park at a good location, get a supply line from the road, (water is supplied by structural engines and tankers, usually kept out on the road) and pull lines off the rig and go to work. Our Fires often are slow moving horizontally, but burrow deep in the ground, (Prolonged dry spells will see fires two feet deep in places) Thus "Parking" a rig works well for us. Stay Safe....

    Leave a comment:


  • SamsonFCDES
    replied
    Originally posted by FlyingKiwi
    To save money, why not put a manual monitor on the back and sit a guy on the tank to work it, saves on boot leather and sweat.

    And it is less likely to malfunction when you need it.
    We are realy trying to get away from people riding on the tanks/beds.

    It is a major NO NO if you are caught riding cowboy style at a State or Federal run fire. You will be no so politely asked to leave and NEVER come back. It is also a major liability issue when somebody falls off and busts their ***.

    IMO I think that a wildland fire engine should be designed so that everything can be reached from the ground, no mokey bars (railings used to ride on the back and crall around), no riding on the tanks, no falling off and busting a leg.

    Squirt guns for the front, rear monted reel, no lawsuites or reprimands from our friends in the State lands, BLM, or USFS.

    Leave a comment:


  • FlyingKiwi
    replied
    To save money, why not put a manual monitor on the back and sit a guy on the tank to work it, saves on boot leather and sweat.

    And it is less likely to malfunction when you need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • SamsonFCDES
    replied
    Re: None..........

    Originally posted by hwoods
    Our next Brush rig will not have a reel. We use 1" forestry line and plan on several preconnected 1" lines of differing lenghths. The savings in money and weight are enough reason to forgo a reel for us. Stay Safe....
    I cant imagine pump and roll without a booster reel. We have a lot of fast moveing prairie fires which can literaly move 30 miles an hour with our 40-50 mph sustained winds. We either have to jog along the truck with the hose, or we have to ride the "monkey bars" haning on for dear life and trying to hit the fire with the other hand.

    Pump and roll with a preconnect 1" line, that would seem to be a pain in the but. We are constantly pulling our and reeling up hose.

    Since we have a lot of pump and roll, and since that is our number one wildland safety issue IMO (lots of sprained ankles, and I worry about heart attacks when jogging with a hose) we are looking into wildland monitors.

    Like these units.

    http://www.grafire.com/prod01.htm



    The controler is like this.



    They are a bit costly for our budget right now (4500-6200) but that is a small price to pay when you consider the benefits. Hell, you can spend that much in seconds with one busted leg! Beyond the jogging/monkey bar safety issue is the heat stress and smoke inhilation issues. When you are in your airconditioned cab chasing down a prairie fire, you are not breathing in smoke/dirt/dust/soot, and you are relatively comfortable, not wearing 2 layers of wildland PPE, your hotshield, your helmet, a 30 pounp pack, and enduring 100+ degree air temps not to mention that radiant heat.

    We are definatly going to look in to this type of equipment. If/When we get these monitors, I am realy leaning toward a rear mont reel. We would not be useing the reel for pump and roll as often, and if a structure defensive role, the rear monted reel helps keep your front end pointed away from the fire and in theory pointed toward a safety zone.

    IMO for our situation the best set up would be:

    - Front mounted wildland monitor
    - Rear monted 1" booster reel
    - 150 feet of 1.5 inch preconnedt with combination nozzle (for structure stands and for car fires
    - 600 or so of 1" and 1.5" hose with appliances for varios options

    I agree that the side mount reels (like pictures in first post) can be a "reel" (pun intended) pain in the but. You have more difficulty positioning the brush truck, when in pump and roll the hose likes to hook on sagebrush and start to unreel, they stick up in the air and are beat to death by low hung branches, they tend to ur ravel eaisier IMO, and they are much harder to reach from the ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    None..........

    Our next Brush rig will not have a reel. We use 1" forestry line and plan on several preconnected 1" lines of differing lenghths. The savings in money and weight are enough reason to forgo a reel for us. Stay Safe....

    Leave a comment:


  • mtnfireguy
    replied
    Rear mount provides more flexibilty. The top mount as shown in the photo is a pain in rear.

    Rear mount is easy to get to, easy to work on, can go to either side or to the rear.

    Leave a comment:


  • backdraft663
    replied
    In my opinion I would think it would depend on where the truck would be at a fire. Maybe your on the road and there is a fire in the ditch I would say it would be better to have one the side(s). If it were put in the middle would it be accessable from both sides? From the back you would be able to access it from both sides but it wouldnt be as manuverable I would think. Its probably all on your preference.

    Heck if they got the money get one in the back and one on the side.

    Leave a comment:


  • exchief2001
    replied
    side mount/ top mount

    One department in our township has a slide in pump and tank set up eith the hose reel mounted atop of the tank and is mounted sideways to allow for the firefighter to pull the hose line from either side of the truck. This also allows more space in the rear of the truck for additional equipment. I hope this is helpful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wildland: Side Mount Booster reel Vs. Rear mount Booster Reel?

    I am looking for opinions on which is the superior set up for wildland booster line reels on light brush trucks.

    Side mount:

    http://www.wildlandfire.com/pics/eng/blm2.jpg

    Or rear mount:

    http://www.wildlandfire.com/pics/eng2/greng.jpg

    Sometimes you have to pump and roll, sometimes you have to pull hose...

    Which is the best overall approach?

    All opinions welcome, experices and insight appreciated as well.

    Thanks

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