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Air Bags

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  • lutan1
    replied
    Remember the 5-10-20 rule peoples!!!

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  • NYSmokey
    replied
    We were taught to cut the battery cables and then wait at least 2 minutes for the power to run out on the backup charge. You can do your walkaround, stabilize the vehicle, and have a member hold inline stabilization from outside the airbag hazard zone. If an airbag is already deployed, I was under the impression that it is now "safe." The problem is that if the steering wheel airbag deploys and the side curtain or side impact airbag does not and you put your body in the way of that potential explosion.

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  • dragonfyre
    replied
    enginehouse2:

    It all depends on where you are. I'm in SE PA and can travel a bit but not real far. Some of the old GM Training Centers were offering a version of my class (which they stole) but most of the centers are closed now.

    You might want to check with a local GM dealer service manager to see if they know of anything available. GM has some information that the dealer can download for you on air bag safety for the technicians. (*)

    You can also check with the Automotive Coalition for Traffic Safety. They have 2 great videos and many brochures that are free for the asking. There's also the Airbag Institute on-line.

    (*) The information from the factory is where the 30-40 minute rule comes from that "simfirdept" refered to. It's simply CYA from the factory so that the techs don't get hurt like the one in Minnesota.
    Captain Gonzo is correct, it's really seconds not minutes. While researching for the class I found that air bags need 5 volts or more to operate. Cars operate on 12 volts and it really takes around a minute to drop from 12 to 5 volts in most cars.

    It's still a good idea to disconnect the battery (if you can find it) and do your 360, stabilize the vehicle, etc while waiting for the capacitors to drain. Keep all tools away from the deployment path of any air bag and also check for side air bags or curtains before you start cutting any posts.

    If you're uncertain about side curtains, do a trench cut in the roof and lift the patient straight up. It's better than having one of your people become a patient also, like in Dayton.

    If you're close to me, let me know & I'll be glad to set up a class in your station.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by simfirdept
    We have a chrysler mechanic on our volunteer department and he has said the airbags can be activated from 30-40 mins after impact. The more and more airbags present in these vehicles the more dangerous our job becomes.
    Its not minues...it's seconds.

    Some older model luxury cars have capacitors with longer timeframes..Jaguars comes to mind.

    The airbag can deploy as long as the vehicle's electrical capacitors hold their charge. Most hold a charge for 30 to 40 seconds, some a lot less.

    Holmatro's Vehicle Guide for Emergency Responders is an excellent resource. It lists the location of the airbags, seat belt pretensioners, batteries and the capacitor charge times. Holmatro updates the information each year as new car models and improvements in supplemental restraint systems are introduced.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adze39
    replied
    Re: Re: Re: Air Bags

    Originally posted by enginehouse2


    dragonfyre, were can a volly dept get training info on airbags? looks like it is something we need to keep renewing our training on.
    If you are in Southern New England, I know a company that does Air Bag training. We have them coming out on the 16th for our drill.

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  • enginehouse2
    replied
    Re: Re: Air Bags

    Originally posted by dragonfyre
    [B

    I've been teaching a class on air bags since 1991, get all my info from the manufacturers and have never heard of anything like that. [/B]
    dragonfyre, were can a volly dept get training info on airbags? looks like it is something we need to keep renewing our training on.

    Leave a comment:


  • engine1321
    replied
    That NBC special was something too... I think I know one of those guys on that Dayton engine...

    We were always told that if the car still had a roof to tear away the plastic on all the posts just to look, then cut. The other air bags we deal with by having the medic behind the seat and keeping guys clear of those front deploying airbags.

    Dear God I hate airbags... scary things too

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  • Explorer129
    replied
    Hopefully if the impact of the vehicle is great enough for it to be cut, the curtain airbags would of gone off already.

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  • tripperff
    replied
    About all I can add

    ...is that there are some models out there with a side-curtain bag in the A-post of the vehicle. Kinda makes you think twice about where you're gonna cut it when you take the roof off.

    Leave a comment:


  • ThNozzleman
    replied
    I dug this up, because I think it's very important. Link to the story about automotive safety devices, including two-stage airbags, on Firehouse.com:
    http://cms.firehouse.com/content/art...Id=19&id=22458
    I followed the link to the news video, and watched it. The headlights on the vehicle the injured firefighters were working in were still on. If your department does not have a policy of disconnecting batteries (both cables) on wrecked vehicles immediately, you should. I'd hate to be that guy. Also, it appears that two stage airbags are a fact, and should be approached very carefully.

    Leave a comment:


  • PRFD101
    replied
    Started this

    Hi there all, thanks for all the discussion, I am going to check which vehicle it was that I got the actual peice out of that said it flat out in on it to warn of the poosiblity of redeployment, it didn't state that if tehy haven't gone off that they might deploy, it actually did state a warning that they can poosibly REDEPLOY, If my memory is correct it was a newer M class mercedes. I am 98 percent sure that was the vehicle we found it in. I know there are alot of mechanics out there but each company does their own thing and one might not know what the other has in their concerns. The only reason it stands out so much is we were so shocked to find this we took that peice with us. All this news is great to hear, Nothing better then learning more with each day. thanks to all

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  • ThNozzleman
    replied
    Thought I'd knock this one back to the top. Anyone else have any info?

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  • canada33
    replied
    We bought a book ( I think Halmatro put it out) that discribes where every vehicles airbags are located. Covers just about every vehicle imaginable.

    Leave a comment:


  • simfirdept
    replied
    With my post I'm sorry if I confused anyone but the mechanic has said if there are airbags that haven't been deployed you have to watch because 30-40 mins after impact they can go off. I haven't heard or been told anything by the mechanic about a bag redeploying after it's been deployed.

    Leave a comment:


  • ThNozzleman
    replied
    I understand your approach; however, it seems to me that merely having two or more separate ignitors would not change the rate or velocity of the single airbag activation, much like a pile of gunpowder would ignite the same, no matter how many matches were used to ignite it. The only way I could see dual stage airbags being able to work as the auto manufactuars claim would be to have two different charges behind the bag, ignited by two different systems; either separately, together, or in series. I'm an ASE certified Master Tech, myself. But, it's been several years since I worked for a dealership (the last being a Chrysler/GMC dealer), so I'm not as involved in the automotive world as I used to be. I would be very interested in getting to the bottom of this issue. I remember installing airbags in the early 90's; we handled the things like a bomb squad on speed. I sure wouldn't want one going off on my precious melon.

    Leave a comment:

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