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LDH question....

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  • Weruj1
    replied
    Whats a hose box ?

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  • magnolia
    replied
    We use hose boxes and air dams on the hose beds to keep 21,000 feet of our 300 psi hose in the bed. Only makes sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Weruj1
    replied
    my hero !

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  • firenresq77
    replied
    In any event, the service test and initial test pressures should be stenciled on the hose from the factory.
    Took the words right out of my mouth.


    We use a canvas cover for all of our hose beds, also. With the 5" LDH, we use the flat load. The last 6' or so is folded and we have a nylon strap with seatbelt bucles that is fastened to it. We then set the coupling back so it won't bounce out and when needed to hit the hydrant, all you have to do is grab the strap (which has a loop in it) and pull. Then throw the loop arounf the hydrant and have then engine go. I will try to get a picture to post of it.

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  • ullrichk
    replied
    Not all LDH is created equal with respect to test and operating pressures. Our older stuff is service tested to 200 psi. Our newest is something like 300 psi. (It's not at my station, so I can't go check it at the moment.)

    In any event, the service test and initial test pressures should be stenciled on the hose from the factory.

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  • Weruj1
    replied
    CR ................200 psi @ 5 for test and I believe it is rated @ 400 psi right outa the box.........or rated that way for the duration.

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  • tripperff
    replied
    for ChiefReason

    LDH hose should be service tested annually at 200 psi for 5 minutes.

    for anyone who's interested:

    A member of our FD who owns a machine shop made a single roller for our LDH. The way it works is two firefighters set it under the hose and walk the water out of it after gravity has done all it can. DO NOT BREAK THE COUPLINGS! (In my opinion breaking the couplings is where you get a lot of air in the hose. We had a guy transfer to our FD and shortly after that he was on a hose testing detail with 2000' of 4" on the ground. As everyone else was taking a short break before loading the hose, he had the bright idea of breaking the couplings to drain the water. When everyone else saw him they let him have it. To this day he is still known as 'Snap-Tite', you do the math on that) This leaves a little water in the hose, which is good in the long run for us. When it's time to load we just drive alongside the hose and feed it back up into the hosebed. As the little bit of water left in the hose drains it gets sucked flat as a flounder. You kinda need it flat when there's 2000' of LDH in the hosebed. If anyone is interested I can send a picture of the roller.
    Last edited by tripperff; 09-17-2003, 04:11 PM.

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  • firefiftyfive
    replied
    LDH

    The 3 engines in my dept. all have 5" leather LDH and we had that problem one time as well. We now put all our couplings at the front of the bed and more importantly we make sure the folds are tucked over the couplings slightly behind them which prevents the wind from taking the whole length off. We also us bungee cords.

    P.S. I'm glad I transferred into the Truck company

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  • ChiefReason
    replied
    In regards to LDH, does anyone know(I'm sure someone does) at what pressure 5-inch hose should be tested? What is the rating right out of the box?
    Your help is most appreciated.
    CR

    Leave a comment:


  • ullrichk
    replied
    Originally posted by jsdobson
    There is a commercially available set of plastic rollers that are connected via a hinge. There are also handles on both sides of the rollers so they can be held by one or two firefighters.
    Got 'em, but I'd prefer to let gravity do the work for me! We found that we get more air in the line by breaking down the lay at every coupling than if we leave it intact. The only exception being the first time we load the stuff out of the box - hence the shop vac idea.

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  • CollegeBuff
    replied
    I was kind of curious myself what the apparatus had to do with the hose.....

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  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by stm4710
    Well Ron,
    If you all in Marlboro got your heads out of your bum and accept the fact that your trucks are first rate,third rate junk wagons you wouldnt have a problem. Wait.....your an instructor at the academy and cant even pack hose right????? I feel sorry for these new recruits.

    Anyway,a 4x8'sheet of 5/8"ths plywood does the job nicely.
    Well, I don't know what to say to you ...except...

    Kiss my Axe!
    PS: I love kittens (mfd joke!)

    Leave a comment:


  • jsdobson
    replied
    perfesser,

    There is a commercially available set of plastic rollers that are connected via a hinge. There are also handles on both sides of the rollers so they can be held by one or two firefighters. The sections of hose are disconnected and the air and water are forced out of the hose as the rollers are placed above and below the hose and pushed down the hose. Once the rollers have reached the end of the hose, just fold the coupling over the hose to keep air out of the hose until you're ready to load it on the apparatus.

    If you don't like the idea of the rollers, which have a bad tendency to pinch fingers, you can always roll up the hose to drain the air and water out of the hose. Once our hose is rolled, we use a commerically available "lazy susan" to rotate the hose as we load it onto the hosebed.

    Dobber

    Leave a comment:


  • ullrichk
    replied
    Speaking of the air in the hose . . .

    New hose doesn't seem to want to lay well in the hose bed. We improvised a storz-to-shop-vac adapter (which required considerable amounts of duct tape) and sucked a new hose load flat in about 20 min. We only had to do this once.

    If you're new to LDH, when you get ready to take up, break the LDH lay at the highest point in the lay and fold the coupling back to seal the end of the hose. Break the lay at the lowest point and the water will create a vacuum as it drains. Your LDH will look like it has been ironed flat.

    Leave a comment:


  • captstanm1
    replied
    Mr. President......

    Most people that have experienced this tell me that they believe it to be caused by the wind getting under the hose as they drive. The wind in combination with the residual air that is almost impossible to get out causes the hose to flip over itself and "lay out."

    Solutions:
    Have a cover manufactured that is about 3 feet in length and the width of the hose bed. Attach it with a heavy duty piano type hinge to the front of the hose bed. This will hold the hose down and keep the wind off. It is easly raised and secured to something with a latch or strap so it is out of the way during re-packing.

    OR.....Use what I believe is called the "Fire Town Load"??? some one help me out if I am wrong. In this case whenever you come to a coupling you use a dutchman to change the direction of the hose and get all the couplings at the front end of the hose bed. This places all the weight on the front of the hose load and will keep it in the bed.

    Leave a comment:

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