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  • IrishLad
    replied
    Hey all,

    I love the new scott airpack fifty! Yet more expensive, it is comfortable, lightweight, fits both kevlar and new carbon composite cylinders. I also like the fact that it has the built in pal device which automatically switches on as soon as the system is charged.

    Another great advantage I like is the buddy breathing device. I know everyone doesn't want to give up their air, but when my brothers and sisters are in trouble, I have no problem clicking them into my system!

    Scott is also most widely used in CA, so I know when I am on a mutual aid assignment, light air utilities will support our cylinders.

    New carbon composite cylinders are also only 6.9 lbs. empty! Great for performance.

    Leave a comment:


  • redtrucks
    replied
    We are looking at replacing our old 2216 MSA with Drager or MSA 4500 psi SCBA. These are the only two companies that have a dealer within 100 miles of our district and I know that I would get support from them. Can anyone give me their opinion on these two? We were really impressed with the Drager. Have not seen a new MSA.

    Leave a comment:


  • NortonFFEMT
    replied
    Now my Dept has use Interspiro for years, and we just upgraded to their newest style about a year ago. The only problem we had with them "breaking" is with the old solid back plate they would crack if repeadedly handeled improperly over the course of many years. However with the new frame that problem has been eliminated. As far as drags are concerned, we've put every one of our 35+ airpacks through the paces, includeing firefighter drag, and lowering on the approved D-ring, and have not once had one fail, includeing the facepiece. We ran the Scott 2.2 prior to getting the Interspiro and I welcome the change. But the bottom line is put any pack through the paces and find the one that will work for your situation the best.

    And as far as going with what has been arround for years. How is anything suposed to evolve if theres no compitition. What if the new guy has the best product hands down, but there not one of the "god ole boys" then what, we go without? What about things like thermal imagery? If we would have waited for a big manufacturer to come out with one of thouse products, we'd pry still be waiting. Look at extrication equipment, Hurst is the old boy on the block, but we ditched Hurst in a heartbeat for Halmatro, why, because they were better. Open your mind a little, go with whats best, someties it's the good ole boy, and sometimes it's the new guy.

    Please refer to: http://www.interspiro-us.com/news_ar...ry_28_2003.htm
    Last edited by NortonFFEMT; 10-08-2003, 07:13 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • firefighterdfd7
    replied
    I know what axman is talking about I attended the norfolk va firehouse on the road last year and when doing firefighter drags using the air packs to drag everyone of the intersperios broke. they were brand new out of the box the chief brought with him to show them off we laughed at him and he bought a lot of beers later on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Axman91
    replied
    you get what you pay for

    I have used the new interspero air packs, they are JUNK, for starters the air pack frame is make of plastic and i have had them break several times, the worst part about them is the face piece it is also made of the same cheap plastic so when you get to the front door and pull the straps to tighten the straps on the face piece they break causing the unit to be OOS, so I look at it this way you get what you pay for, and use something that has been tested in the field for years (Scott or msa )

    Leave a comment:


  • firedesign
    replied
    Originally posted by scbaguy
    As far as the interchangability of the bottles, I'll tell ya' what I know; The threads on the bottles are all CGA(Compressed Gas Association) standard. I think the high pressure bottles have a longer threaded portion in relation to the low pressure bottles, to keep from overpressurizing a SCBA. I have talked to the NIOSH people about useing the 2216 bottles on a 4500 pack, and the synopsis is this:

    The packs are sent in from the manufacturers for testing to OSHA, NIOSH, NFPA etc. They are sent in the configuration they are designed to be sold/used in. Example- Scott sends a 4500 pack with a 4500 bottle to be tested. Actually, each manufacturer sends a lot of packs. They send one of each version they have, ie. they send in one with a beacon alarn and one with no alarm and one with EBSS, and one with kevlar harness, one with EDPM harness... all are tested as an assembly. What theY don't do is send a 4500 pack with a 2216 bottle, or send a Scott pack with a MSA bottle. (this is important later)

    NIOSH tests and certifies each variation sent as an assembled unit. Those that pass are certified to meet their standards. Any variation that has not been tested is not approved, and voids NIOSH standards and certification. You could not take a Scott shoulder harness and put it on your MSA because you like the way the Scott straps feel. This would void your certification of the unit as well as the warrenty. If anything happened while useing this unit, you would be at fault for modifing the unit with unapproved parts.
    There is a stipulation about "emergency" conditions. Basically it means that if you are on the fireground, and have the option of useing say a 2216 bottle on a 4500 pack because a man is down and you have no 4500 bottles, it is permissable to use the 2216 bottle until the emergency is over. So, if it was an "Emergency" and you had to use say MSA bottles on Survivair packs, it should be alright. However IMPO, planning to use them this way would void the "emergency" clause.
    The most important point with using a 2216 on a 4500 SCBA is that the alarm points will not be correct. However, I would still do it in a emergency... just keep in mind that you would not be at 23-27% of bottle capacity (you would actually have more) when your alarm activates.

    Leave a comment:


  • ppeadvice
    replied
    HUD Differences

    Oh Boy!

    There are alot of opinions out there, as usual regarding SCBA's. Here is my two sense. There are two(2) different approaches.

    1) HUD hard wired or via sender/receiver method (telemetry).

    The schools of thought are that if you use a hard wired signal, this will guarantee that you will receive the signal. Sure somebody can cut the line, but this is a piece of life saving equipment. You wouldn't be cutting an "Intermediate Hose Line" now would you?

    In addition, the hard wired signal is consistant, and constantly updated. In the case of the "Transmission Method" how can you be sure that the 1) signal is accurate without interference, or 2) that the signal is continuously updated all the time. Please ask the representatives of these products how the Cylinder pressure is updated on the HUD? Is the signal sent every 1, 2 or 10 seconds, and is it being sent all the time when I pressurize the system, or to I have to tell it to update by hitting a button or some device? In addition, what I have heard is that the "receiver Transmitter" method requires alot of power, so the maintenance required for battery changes may be a burdon on some departments. I firmly believe in technology advances, but the method of applying the available technology must be easy, and make sense to the firefighter. Avoid fads and features to be different. Give me something that makes sense, and is easy to interpret.

    Leave a comment:


  • IAFFChad165
    replied
    Drager's HUD is wireless so I guess I can't snip it. But to give my two cents on the original question....My career Department up until a few years ago used SurviveAir and after much begging and pleading for real air packs we finally got MSA's and they have been great. My vollie department on the other hand has used Drager for 15 years and they are great packs. I can tell you that Survive Air will be cheaper in price than Drager. But you will get what you pay for in the end.

    Leave a comment:


  • DonnellyFire
    replied
    -EFD840
    I got the run down on the interferance straight from the MSA regional manager. He said that when an airpack is turned on that the HUD can and will sense any airpack around it, within about two feet. So say I throw my pack right next to you, and you turn your air on, before I do, and you do not have your mask, and I do... then my HUD will register off of your airpack. Once we seperate, about 2 to 3 feet, my HUD will sense my airpack, and will stay locked into my airpack. He swore that it works very well, and it is extremely over played by other SCBA dealers. It sounds like everyone of the other dealers wished that they wanted to go wireless, and just didn't attempt it. I really think they all will once they see that it works. There is just too much to get tangled up in with the non-wireless system. I can see it now, somebody getting caught up in wire, they pull out their dykes and snip their HUD electronics.

    Take it Easy Bro!

    Leave a comment:


  • fyrgrunt
    replied
    My dept. has MSA, ISI (two kinds Rangers and Magnums),Cairns, and one Draeger. You never know what you'll have to use because they are scattered on four different engines. So it depends on what engine you go on. Its very frustrating. We are a small paid department supplemented with volunteers. All the other dept.s have mostly MSA. Maybe one day we'll have just one kind of pack, but for now thats what we deal with. I personally prefer MSA because that what I used in Fire School.

    Leave a comment:


  • EFD840
    replied
    Donnelly,

    Have you heard any stories about interference messing with the HUD on the wireless packs? We're evaluating new packs and have heard some unverified stories about interference between packs when the users are in very close proximity. Again, nobody could give a specific example for us to research so it may just be competitors trying to discredit the other vendors, but it sounded plausible.

    Leave a comment:


  • DonnellyFire
    replied
    We have been doing SCBA comparisons. We are in the process of purchasing 15 new packs. We have been extremely impressed with MSA, and their wireless system. Everything seems to be very easy to fix. As long as you keep a good eye on your batteries. Some of the other SCBA manufacturers, that have the non-wireless system, say that they have around a 3 year warranty on the electrical. I seem to think that if we do have problems with the electrical that it isn't going to be in 3 years, but 5 or 10. Also, it seems to me like you want to minimize stuff on your SCBA pack ie: wires running here and there. Has anybody broke, or pulled out the wires? Has anybody had trouble with the wireless system??? I wonder if the companies that didn't go wireless, will in 2 years. Something to think about...

    Keep it Safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Compatibility NOT an issue?

    At least in this State,you need to be certified,fit tested,and "papered"for each type of Scba you wear.So if all your neighbors have 5 different kinds of packs you'd need 5 certifications.How's that working on the "I don't care what my neighbors use"thinking?All my neighbors use 1 of two brands so in theory all I'd need to do is "Cert"twice.In reality I carry my own pack so all I need to do is "Cert" once.But with 5 of 6 towns around us using one brand it certainly makes life easier.Makes life easier on maintaince too as we can get one price for "benching"all the packs,instead of each town doing them separately. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • scbaguy
    replied
    As far as the interchangability of the bottles, I'll tell ya' what I know; The threads on the bottles are all CGA(Compressed Gas Association) standard. I think the high pressure bottles have a longer threaded portion in relation to the low pressure bottles, to keep from overpressurizing a SCBA. I have talked to the NIOSH people about useing the 2216 bottles on a 4500 pack, and the synopsis is this:

    The packs are sent in from the manufacturers for testing to OSHA, NIOSH, NFPA etc. They are sent in the configuration they are designed to be sold/used in. Example- Scott sends a 4500 pack with a 4500 bottle to be tested. Actually, each manufacturer sends a lot of packs. They send one of each version they have, ie. they send in one with a beacon alarn and one with no alarm and one with EBSS, and one with kevlar harness, one with EDPM harness... all are tested as an assembly. What theY don't do is send a 4500 pack with a 2216 bottle, or send a Scott pack with a MSA bottle. (this is important later)

    NIOSH tests and certifies each variation sent as an assembled unit. Those that pass are certified to meet their standards. Any variation that has not been tested is not approved, and voids NIOSH standards and certification. You could not take a Scott shoulder harness and put it on your MSA because you like the way the Scott straps feel. This would void your certification of the unit as well as the warrenty. If anything happened while useing this unit, you would be at fault for modifing the unit with unapproved parts.
    There is a stipulation about "emergency" conditions. Basically it means that if you are on the fireground, and have the option of useing say a 2216 bottle on a 4500 pack because a man is down and you have no 4500 bottles, it is permissable to use the 2216 bottle until the emergency is over. So, if it was an "Emergency" and you had to use say MSA bottles on Survivair packs, it should be alright. However IMPO, planning to use them this way would void the "emergency" clause.

    Leave a comment:


  • radioguy
    replied
    No, I just thought your post sounded kinda lika a brochure, my bad. I was just curious, with a user name like ppeadvice it sounded like you may have a strong background in this, juts curious where you were coming from.

    As far as sharing from one supplier to another, pretty much everyone we run with is using Scott so we haven't run into that problem yet.

    Leave a comment:

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