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Flat load vs. accordian hose load

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  • Fire304
    replied
    We do have one more accordian lay other than the trash line, 800' of 5" LDH in the hose bed of the tower. Its the only we can load it due to the hose chute. Other than hose testing it's only come off once, and it was a real bitch getting it back on the truck at oh-dark-thirty in the AM after a good defensive op.

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  • cozmosis
    replied
    Actually, my first department still uses the accordian load for the 3-inch supply line. The hose beds on two of their pumpers are very shallow. Accordian loading two layers of 3" seems to allow the maximum amount of supply hose.

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  • bobsnyder
    replied
    Let's see...

    All of our crosslays are 200' Minuteman loads (flat, of course), some 1.75" line and some 2" line. Our engine's LDH load (1800 ft. of 5") and rear extension line (200' of 2") are flat straight-loads, while the rear 2.5" line (200') and front trash line (100') are flat triple-loads. On the tanker-pumpers, the LDH loads (400' of 5") are horseshoe loads and the crosslays (200' of 2") are Minuteman loads.

    We've got almost everything except accordian loads covered...and I can't remember the last time I saw an accordian load on anything other than antiques in parades.

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  • Flochief
    replied
    We do a split 600 ft 3" flat load forward lay. Our preconnects are 1 3/4" Triple lay 1 200ft 1 150 ft. We also have a 200 ft 2 1/2 preconnect.

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  • cozmosis
    replied
    We use a flat load for the LDH and 2.5" line in the hose bed and a triple-fold for 1.75" preconnects. For some reason, the powers that be did not spec a 2.5" preconnect when they bought the truck 10 years ago. To give us some sort of 2.5" attack line that's ready to use, we have 150' horseshoe loaded with a nozzle onto an old spine board in one of the cabinets.

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  • nrz2334
    replied
    We use flat lay in the hose bed and triple lay for the cross lays/pre connect 1 3/4

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  • Duffman
    replied
    My two cents

    Whatever load you choose remember this. The most important aspect of a hose load is how well it works when you deploy it. Too many people worry about using a load that is easy to put in the bed. 99% if us aren't busy enough to be concerned with how fast we can put the hose in the bed. It is how quickly we can stretch the hose that counts.

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  • CrossBro1
    replied
    We use the flat load for our supply lines.
    Our attack lines are:
    200' 1 3/4" - Modified Minuteman
    250' 1 3/4" - Modified Minuteman
    200' 2 1/2" - Modified Minuteman
    150' Crosslay 1 3/4" - Flat

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  • KAM1685
    replied
    Baker Lay (triple lay) is what I think works the best for attack lines. One person can pull it off very quickly, and he/she doesn't have to worry about it kinking.

    Flat lay is used for supply line; it is just too big and cumbersome to try anything fancy.

    One of my Depts. uses all baker lay side preconnects and has extra lengths in the back compartment (accordian lay) if only 100' or so is needed.

    The other uses one side baker lay and one side flat lay.

    You will probably need at least three to do the baker lay, which might turn some people off from doing it. If you have more than three, it can be put up fairly quickly.

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  • Roofhook
    replied
    Originally posted by Weruj1
    flat loaders here too..............have monkeyed around with the triple layer load, which I think is the same as the minute man load ?
    Actually they are 2 different loads.
    The triplefold looks like a compressed S....give you 2 bends in the hose
    The minuteman load is basically a flat load with the nozzle placed onto the flat load then the last 25 feet of hose is layed on top the nozzle. When you pull the load, you place the nozzle and last 25 feet of hose on your shoulder and then pull the flat loaded hose off.
    Kind of hard to explain in writing.

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  • jsdobson
    replied
    We switched from the accordian load to the flat load when we migrated from 3" to 5" supply lines. We also load all the couplings at the front of the hose bed; not so much for neatness but so that we can count how much hose has been laid.

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  • Weruj1
    replied
    flat loaders here too..............have monkeyed around with the triple layer load, which I think is the same as the minute man load ?

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  • Roofhook
    replied
    We use 2 types of hose loads on our trucks. Flat load for supply lines and triple fold on attack lines.
    Do to a constant lack of man-power in our little department, we found that it was easier to go this route.
    The flat load on the supply line (we use 3") makes for a simple load that 1 or 2 people can reload, plus there are less bends in the hose.
    All couplings are loaded towards the front of the bed to make the load neater.
    We found that using a triple fold on the attack lines reduced the amount of "bundled up" hose laying on the ground in a knot. Although the triple fold reduces the amount of working line you have at the door, we found that it was easier to train the membership to pull the triplefold than train then to properly pull the flat load.
    Last edited by Roofhook; 07-29-2003, 07:14 AM.

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  • FF41230
    replied
    We only have an accordian load on one of our engines. Its 100ft of 2 1/2 off the back that we use for a supply line out in the county. Everything else is flat load. We just recently switched all of our prconnect crosslays to the triple layer load. This works very good, it pulls off easy and you dont have a big spagetti pile at the side of the engine.

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  • July36
    replied
    We use all flat loads on everything EXCEPT the preconnected matydale "first-in" line on the rear of the truck....less time consuming loading all that wet hose after a tiring several hours on a fire.

    Donna C
    Fire Chief
    Bridge Canyon VFD
    http://www.cms.firehouse.com/dept/SeligmanAZ

    Leave a comment:

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