Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help With Rope Rescue Ops

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help With Rope Rescue Ops

    DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT STANDARD NEEDS TO BE MET WITH ROPE RESCUE SYSTEMS? IS THERE A WEIGHT LIMIT THAT NEEDS TO BE MET WITH A SYSTEM? OR WILL UL LISTED, NFPA, ANSI, AND OSHA CERTIFIED PRODUCTS SUFFICE? THANKS FOR YOUR HELP BROS.

    KEEP IT SAFE AND GOD BLESS!

  • #2
    NFPA 1983 is the standard for rope rescue systems and components. I believe that the minimum weight for a two person load is 900 pounds.
    Northeast Fire Photos

    Comment


    • #3
      NFPA 1983 is the standard for life safety rope and system components.
      It defines two levels of equipment Light use and General use. Light use is for one person loads 300 lbs and General is two person or a rescue load of 600 lbs.
      With rope we use a 15:1 safety factor or 1 person rope is 4500 lbs and General is 9000 lbs (1/2")
      A term used in strength rating is the k/N. While a Kilonewton is a measurement of force it is appoximatly 1 k/N to 224.809 lbs
      Many of the components do not have a 15:1 safety factor. Because of our relationship with NFPA I would use their recommendations for most of our stuff. You can use the manufacturers recommendations also. Some companies like PETZL make good equipment but not all of it is NFPA approved.

      Hope that helps

      Comment


      • #4
        Watch the alphabet soup.....

        Watch reading thru the "Who certifies What" part of the books. For instance UL has nothing to do with rope, nor does FM, but they are two labels that you see on all electrical equipment. "NFPA Compliant" is a good sign, along with ANSI, CalOSHA, and a few others. Be aware of the differences between Climbing, AKA recreational rope use, and Rescue. There are areas where the two disciplines are far apart on some things. Carabieners are one thing, Rescue 'bieners are ALWAYS steel locking oval or D shape, while climbing 'beiners do not lock (for the most part). There are other things too, such as different harnesses for climbing and Rescue. To be successful in this field, remember one thing and the rest is easy. SAFETY COMES FIRST. No victim has ever been saved by a dead Rescuer. Stay safe....
        Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
        In memory of
        Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
        Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

        IACOJ Budget Analyst

        I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

        www.gdvfd18.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Table of Contents for NFPA 1983 Standard on Fire Service Life Safety Rope and System Components 2001 Edition

          Chapter 1 Administration

          Chapter 2 Certification

          Chapter 3 Labeling and Information

          Chapter 4 Design and Construction Requirements

          Chapter 5 Performance Requirements

          Chapter 6 Testing Requirements

          Chapter 7 Referenced Publications

          Appendix A Explanatory Material

          Appendix B Referenced Publications

          Index

          This item can be purchased at the NFPA website



          Click Here
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment

          300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

          Collapse

          Upper 300x250

          Collapse

          Taboola

          Collapse

          Leader

          Collapse
          Working...
          X