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Uh oh. The cops are at it again :)

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  • BLACKSHEEP1
    replied
    Hi Wendt, miss me? Sounds like who ever these guys were, did a great job. I wonder how they got equipped with extrication tools, and no protective gear or extinguishers?. Seems to me like the same old deal, instead of funding the local fire department they're trying to make 1 guy do the job of 2, in this case it's pd. There's a county down here, where the sherrif is trying to take over fire/ems protection under the guise of consolidation and less expense. Every time that gets done, and it's been done here, the cops get the lead administrative job, and the fire department gets jammed. It's one of the public safety models that are around. We had cops that had bunker gear in their cruisers, arriving piecemeal and getting in the way, and firetrucks and crews w/o arrest powers patrolling shopping centers. Fortunately the city saw the light and offloaded that plan after only a few years. As usual, it looked good on paper.

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  • Bones42
    replied
    Five Children Rescued From Burning Home

    Five Children Rescued From Burning Home
    Mother Tries To Put Grease Fire Out But Was Unsuccessful

    POSTED: 6:12 a.m. MDT July 10, 2003
    UPDATED: 11:04 a.m. MDT July 10, 2003


    Story by thedenverchannel.com

    DENVER -- Two Denver police officers with the gang unit rescued five children from a burning home Wednesday evening when they drove their regular beat and saw smoke and flames coming out of a house.


    The Pride family was out on the porch after dinner when a grease fire started in their home on the 3200 block of Jasmine Street. One of the little boys noticed smoke coming from the kitchen and all of the children ran back inside to see what was happening, 7NEWS reported.


    Their mother, Corinza Pride, had a fire extinguisher but in the panic of the moment, she didn't know how to use it. She also tried throwing flour on the flames, which had reached up to the ceiling, but was unsuccessful.

    The mother said if it weren't for the officers, her entire home would have been engulfed in flames.

    "This kitchen would be on fire because I don't know how to work the fire extinguisher. If it wasn't for him we'd be homeless right now," Pride said.

    "The entire house was filled with smoke, we saw numerous small children in there. We immediately started getting them out. My partner escorted all the kids out of the house, cleared the house for any remaining bodies," said Officer Perry Speelman, "and I grabbed the fire extinguisher and put the fire out."

    The officers are both heroes this morning in the eyes of the Pride family. They are also heroes to their sergeant, who said he couldn't be more proud of his officers.

    "It's an outstanding day. It doesn't get better than this. That's what this job is all about, helping people and saving lives and that's what those two officers did today," said Sgt. Danny O'Shea.


    Copyright 2003 by TheDenverChannel.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    That's what this job is all about, helping people and saving lives and that's what those two officers did today," said Sgt. Danny O'Shea.
    Absolutely great statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeWendtCFI
    replied
    (or none if we're off duty & George shows up in his flowered shirt, shorts, snow white legs, white socks, & black shoes),
    That happens to be standard issue off-duty gear, pal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ohiovolffemtp
    replied
    Great job, officers!!!!

    To what George said: our (all in public safety: fire, EMS, police) goal is fast, effective, and safe help for those in need. No matter what uniform we wear (or none if we're off duty & George shows up in his flowered shirt, shorts, snow white legs, white socks, & black shoes), as long as we make good judgements, use our training, and equipment, and work well with other responders, we should focus on what helps the victims, not on "turf".

    The appropriate system design can vary from place to place. In some areas I run, we routinely arrive before police, so having them trained as EMS 1st responders isn't a good choice. In other areas, they arrive 1st, so it is a great choice. In the same way, I've run in areas where there was only a single officer on duty. Having an firefighter show up and work with the officer to restrain a subject kept the both the officer & subject safer.

    To that end, it's really simple. Get to know your other responders, talk to them, train with them, know their equipment & help them know yours, then work together. Follow-up calls with conversations about how to do it better next time. Visit, eat, and chat together.

    The public will be best served this way. We'll have more satisfaction on calls this way.

    Leave a comment:


  • nmfire
    replied
    Also keep in mind the newspaper has an interesting way of reporting how and what we do at accidents. "They peeled the doors off" could very well mean "They opened the door by pulling really hard".

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Give the Explorers guns and........

    Yes, I'm kidding. The officers referred to here are examples of many who just dig in and do what has to be done, when the $#%@& hits the fan. My complements to them for an outstanding job. We have a number of local PD officers among our Volunteer ranks, and they are some of our more active members. A good working relationship has always been the norm around here for as long as I can remember. Stay Safe....

    Leave a comment:


  • cozmosis
    replied
    I'm curious about the time table. If the car *and* the patient were on fire upon PD's arrival... I'm wondering what exactly "pry off the roof" means. And how they did it before the passenger compartment was fully involved without some sort of fire suppression efforts.
    Last edited by cozmosis; 07-09-2003, 01:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bones42
    replied
    there are those on here who would argue that the cops had no business performing this rescue
    Yes, it's a pity people fell that way. I am not one of them. Good job again.

    Leave a comment:


  • nmfire
    replied
    Originally posted by ShuswapFireF
    So your saying these four cops should have stood around and let this guy burn to death so as not to step on the toes of the fire dept. Do you know if the Fairview fire dept does infact do rescue, not all fire departments do or allowed to do rescue.
    Am, no. See, that was called sarcasm. The topic subject was poking fun at the people that George mentioned that feel cops have no buisness doing that. I posted it here because I applaud their efforts.

    Leave a comment:


  • FlyingKiwi
    replied
    Detective Anthony McVeigh
    Daniel Valentine
    Edward DeVito
    Erik Ward

    Good save Brothers, Kia Kaha to a speedy recovery.

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgeWendtCFI
    replied
    Generally speaking, there are a growing number of PD's who are placing "Emergency Service Units" in service. They are designed as first responders and range from a patrol car with basic supplies to elaborate mini-rescue trucks with medical supplies and extrication equipment. The units that I am familiar with, use EMT-D's.

    As far as discussing the actions of these officers, there is little question that this was a selfless, courageous act. However, there are those on here who would argue that the cops had no business performing this rescue, but see nothing wrong with forcing a car off the road if they suspected the driver was drunk. It is sheer jealousy and an anti-cop attitude.

    This was a heroic act. Nothing less. They should be commended period.

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    Basically this amounts to the "They do things differently down there", but still a bit of a surprise to hear hydraulics getting used by PD personnel. Good save guys.... but I too have the question about use of (?) Fire Extinguishers????

    It would be interesting to hear from somone in that Neck 'O the Woods who was on scene.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bones42
    replied
    In one of our PD cruisers, they carry a hand operated set of jaws/cutters. Plenty of power for moving a roof. They have it in case of needing forced entry at a crime scene, but it has other uses. My FD does not do extrication, my EMS Squad does.

    Was not there, and glad it had good outcome...but did any of them think of using their extinguishers to put the fire out? Story does not make any mention...so just wondering.

    Leave a comment:


  • ShuswapFireF
    replied
    So your saying these four cops should have stood around and let this guy burn to death so as not to step on the toes of the fire dept. Do you know if the Fairview fire dept does infact do rescue, not all fire departments do or allowed to do rescue.

    Leave a comment:


  • WannabeintheFD
    replied
    The smoke was so thick, we could not see or breathe
    imagine that, smoke was thick, so they couldnt see or breathe?? i could have told them that.

    Leave a comment:

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