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Cincinnati LODD investigation leads to changes

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  • Cincinnati LODD investigation leads to changes

    On March 21, 2003, Oscar Armstrong III became the first Cincinnati firefighter to lose his life in the line of duty in 22 years. He died fighting a fire in a structure that every firefighter reading these boards generally sees as "bread and butter" operations.

    Initial reports say that his death was the result of something as simple as a line that was too long (350 feet), and kinked so severely that the flow of water was severely impeded, if not altogether prevented. The report states that he and two other firefighters entered the structure after they and a supervisor had called multiple times for water.

    Oscar, only 25 years old, was critically burned when the structure essentially flashed over. He had been in the structure for 10 minutes when other firefighters finally found him and took him out of a window. They had thought he was out of the house.

    Other issues discovered and resolved:
    • Lines must have kinks removed while advancing lines to the fire,
    • Companies have been ordered to reduce pre-connected hoses to no more than 250 feet, and remove all "Y" connectors from hose lines.

    The gated "Y" issue wasn't a factor in Oscar's death, but officials felt it was necessary to eliminate the extra step of opening another valve to flow water.

    There is in article in the Cincinnat Enquirer regarding the story. I used information from that article in this post.

    It doesn't take a large warehouse, or high rise building on fire to kill any of us. It can happen in the simplest of structures. Places we see everyday as "no big deal". We should all remember that the unexpected can happen at any time, any place, and to anybody. None of us are immune or exempt. Nothing should be routine.

    In his memory...
    Last edited by Steamer; 07-01-2003, 12:58 PM.
    Steve Gallagher
    IACOJ BOT
    ----------------------------
    "I don't apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there." - Woody Hayes

  • #2
    Thanks Steamer for the post I was wondering what they finally found out.
    AKA: Mr. Whoo-Whoo

    IAFF Local 3900

    IACOJ-The Crusty Glow Worm

    ENGINE 302 - The Fire Rats

    F.A.N.T.A.M FOOLS FTM-PTB

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    • #3
      He acknowledged that "it appears that there may have been better decisions that could've been made," but said it's unfair to look back in hindsight and criticize.
      DISCLAIMER: I AM NOT SAYING ANYTHING NEGATIVE ABOUT THE FIRE FIGHTERS INVOLVED IN THE CINCINATTI INCIDENT. I AM MAKING A COMMENT ABOUT THE MANNER IN WHICH SOME LODD INVESTIGATIONS ARE CONDUCTED.

      This is exactly my problem with the way that some LODD investigations are conducted. Why not look back in hindsight and criticize? Very often someone is to blame. What if a LODD is caused by a completely inept fire officer? Why shouldn't the investigation report call a horse a horse? If you screwed up, you screwed up. Maybe you'll learn and you won't do it again. Maybe you shouldn't be an officer in the first place. Maybe your FF are poorly trained. Maybe you committed an unsafe act. Maybe you did something downright stupid. Maybe the deceased member did something to contribute to his own death.

      Examples?
      1. The Hackensack Ford fire was caused by an incompetent fire officer who ordered his men to an almost certain death.

      2. The training officer in the Parsippany, NJ training accident ordered recruits into an untenable atmosphere that was certain to flashover and certain to injure.

      3. A LODD in Newark where the truck co. Capt. ordered a truck placement that necessitated anyone ascending the aerial to climb in close (really close) proximity to power lines.

      4. A LODD in Passaic, NJ where the deceased member was ordered to stay in one place and instead, freelanced and got seperated and lost.

      A LODD investigation report should be a compilation of facts, a list of deficiencies (or as the fire service likes to call them "lessons learned"), and a list of recommendations. The report should contain exhibits to support the report and a list of citations of supporting material.

      My guess would be that when the NIOSH report comes out, it will name names. Look at the Osceola report.
      Last edited by GeorgeWendtCFI; 07-01-2003, 11:16 PM.
      PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the info Steamer.
        IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

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