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  • Time to Wake Up, People!

    Pox-Like Outbreak Reported
    19 Ill in Midwest; CDC Issues Alert
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    By Rob Stein
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Sunday, June 8, 2003; Page A01


    At least 19 people in three Midwestern states have contracted a disease related to smallpox, marking the first outbreak of the life-threatening illness in the United States, federal heath officials said yesterday.

    The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, concerned that the illness could spread, issued a nationwide alert to doctors and public health officials to be on the lookout for more cases.

    "We have an outbreak," said James Hughes, director of the CDC's National Center for Infectious Diseases in Atlanta. "I'd like to keep it relatively small. I don't want any more cases. We're doing everything we can to try to contain this."

    The disease, known as monkeypox, usually only occurs in central and western Africa. It is caused by a virus known as an orthopox virus, which is the family of viruses that includes the smallpox virus, one of the most dangerous diseases known to man and a feared biological weapon.

    Officials said there was no indication that bioterrorism was involved. The disease was apparently spread by rodents known as prairie dogs, which have become popular as pets. The animals may have acquired the infection from another creature, known as a Gambian giant rat, sold by the same dealer of exotic animals, officials said.

    The monkeypox virus causes symptoms that are very similar to smallpox -- fever, headache, cough and an extremely painful rash of pus-filled sores that spreads across the body.

    While much about the monkeypox virus is unclear, it does not seem to be as deadly as smallpox. Authorities estimate that monkeypox has a mortality rate of between 1 percent and 10 percent, compared with a mortality rate of about 30 percent for smallpox.

    The monkeypox virus is believed to spread through physical contact with a sick person or infected animal, or through infected body fluids, although health officials said it apparently is not as easily spread as smallpox, which is highly infectious.

    Monkeypox is untreatable, although there is some indication that an antiviral drug may have some usefulness. Because the disease has never been seen before in this part of the world, the severity of the threat is not completely clear. All patients and infected animals have been isolated -- and pet shops and one house where the prairie dogs lived have been quarantined -- to prevent spread of the disease.

    The smallpox vaccine is believed to be protective against the monkeypox virus. The federal government recently launched a campaign to vaccinate thousands of emergency workers against smallpox so the country would be prepared in the event of a bioterrorist attack.

    "This is an unusual event. As far as we can tell, there's never been a human or animal illness in the community setting in the Western hemisphere by a virus that is either a monkeypox virus or a very close variant of the monkeypox virus," said Hughes, who held a hastily arranged telebriefing last evening to announce the outbreak after CDC scientists confirmed that a monkeypox virus or one very close to it was involved.

    "We've got a disease that's not been seen before in the Western Hemisphere, so it's prudent to take it very seriously," Hughes said in a telephone interview after the briefing.

    Of the 19 cases reported so far, four of the victims have been hospitalized; none has died, Hughes said.

    The outbreak came to light on May 16, when a 3 1/2-year-old child became ill, according to John Melski, who treated the child at the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, Wis.

    The child's parents had bought two prairie dogs as a Mother's Day present for the child's mother. Both the mother and father subsequently became ill as well, although all appear to have recovered.

    Officials determined that the prairie dogs had been purchased from a Villa Park, Ill., exotic pet dealer, who also became ill. The dealer also had a Gambian rat, which was ill. It is believed that animal passed the virus to the prairie dogs the dealer was selling.

    The dealer sold the animals to SK Exotics, a Milwaukee pet distributor, which then sold the apparently infected prairie dogs to two pet stores in Milwaukee and at a "pet swap" in northern Wisconsin.

    Most of the rest of the cases have been reported in the Milwaukee area, and are believed to have involved people who either worked at the stores or who handled the animals in the stores. Seventeen of the cases occurred in Milwaukee, with one case each having been reported in Illinois and Indiana.

    Melski and his colleagues at the Marshfield Clinic contacted state health officials when they identified what appeared to be an orthopox virus in the sick family. State health officials then contacted the CDC, which confirmed the involvement of a monkeypox-like virus yesterday, prompting the nationwide alert and telebriefing.

    The state of Wisconsin has temporarily banned the sale of prairie dogs.

    "The full impact is hard to predict," said Seth Foldy, Milwaukee's health commissioner. "Our goal would be to isolate and eliminate the virus from both human and animal populations to the best of our ability. We do not know if it is the kind of agent that would or could thrive in North America, and we're not very interested in finding out that it is."

    The last time a new infectious disease arrived in the United States was in 1999, when the West Nile virus was first reported. That disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, has since spread nationwide.

    Further tests are planned to confirm the identity of the pox-like virus.

    The outbreak comes as the global epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) appears to be coming under control.

    "This is yet another reminder of why it's important to learn as much as you can about diseases that occur in faraway places," Hughes said.


    © 2003 The Washington Post Company
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  • #2
    great, im going to wisconsin next sunday

    Comment


    • #3
      This is the first I've heard of this outbreak. It clearly illustrates just how "succeptible" we are to all of the worlds health issues. People take for granted that these things only happen "over there". I think as time ticks by, we're going to be seeing more and more of these type problems attacking us in our own land. It is quite frightening to check out the various websites like the CDC and see just how many dangerous viral, bacterial and other medical mysteries there are actively trying to kill people in the world today. As a provider, it really makes me question just what the respiratory distress call might be that I'm running on???
      Brian Rowe
      Paramedic/Engineer
      Colleton County Fire/Rescue

      Comment


      • #4
        Is it the wake up call?

        The disease, known as monkeypox, usually only occurs in central and western Africa. It is caused by a virus known as an orthopox virus, which is the family of viruses that includes the smallpox virus, one of the most dangerous diseases known to man and a feared biological weapon.
        A random outbreak? Or the work of known or unknown terrorist groups?
        Of course, with air travel so common these days...it could be the result of a domestic traveler, returning from Africa....but it is certainly a situation that warrants investigation as to the source.
        George is right. Times have changed...post 9-11. And all of us need to be vigilant...because the attacks may not come from the sky this time. I hope the Centers for Disease Control and our Homeland Security officials take a good, long, hard look at this very suspicious event.

        This one bears watching.
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #5
          WOW !!!!!!!!!!! thanks Goerge for the info ...........
          IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
          Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
          ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
          RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
          LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
          I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
          "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
          http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

          Comment


          • #6
            That's right in my neck of the woods... thanks for the info George. I hadn't heard anything about this until now.

            Comment


            • #7
              Just wanted to bump this, due to the nature.........


              Also, since, somehow, my previous post was deleted..........

              Good luck to all the brothers and sisters in those states on your responses. Stay safe!! Let us know if any of you respond to an incident involving this. Maybe you could provide a little education to many of those out there who don't know much on the smallpox issues.....
              The comments made by me are my opinions only. They DO NOT reflect the opinions of my employer(s). If you have an issue with something I may say, take it up with me, either by posting in the forums, emailing me through my profile, or PMing me through my profile.
              We are all adults so there is no need to act like a child........
              IACOJ

              Comment


              • #8
                Exotic pets?

                A giant Gambian rat? Hey America! send the exotic pets HOME. If it is not native to North America, send it home. NOW. This is where a whole bunch of problems come from, so why do we allow such stupidity to continue? Stay Safe....
                Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                In memory of
                Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                IACOJ Budget Analyst

                I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                www.gdvfd18.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Prairie Dog Illness Resembles Smallpox
                  By TODD RICHMOND
                  The Associated Press
                  Sunday, June 8, 2003; 5:16 PM

                  MADISON, Wis. - Doctors initially feared a smallpox outbreak when they began seeing cases of a mysterious disease that has spread to at least 19 people who came into contact with pet prairie dogs in the Midwest.

                  The symptoms were alarmingly similar - fever, chills, rashes and swollen lymph nodes, said Milwaukee's health commissioner, Dr. Seth Foldy. It was when the prairie dog connection surfaced that they knew it must be something else.

                  "We asked the question but discounted it very early," Foldy said Sunday. "Smallpox has never been known to affect another species."

                  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Saturday pet prairie dogs from a suburban Chicago pet distributor likely are infected with monkeypox, a member of the same viral family as smallpox. The pet rodents may have gotten the disease from another animal at the distributor.

                  The virus can pass animal-to-animal and animal-to-human, and scientists believe it can pass human-to-human, as well, but it had never been documented in North America, Foldy said.

                  So far, at least 17 people in Wisconsin and one each in Illinois and Indiana have become sick since early May with symptoms consistent with monkeypox after coming in contact with prairie dogs.

                  Illinois health officials were investigating three more potential cases in the metropolitan Chicago area, said Jena Welliever, spokeswoman for the state Department of Public Health. The three had contact with a prairie dog and had developed a rash, she said Sunday.

                  "It eventually will clear up as you treat the symptoms," said Mark McLaughlin, a spokesman for Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital in Milwaukee, which has treated several patients with the symptoms.

                  "We don't need people to go off the deep end. This is not an epidemic in the public's common perception of that," he said.

                  Of the people infected, two remained isolated at the hospital in satisfactory condition Sunday, McLaughlin said. He said doctors treating them are wearing masks as a precaution.

                  Both Wisconsin and Illinois banned the sale or importation of prairie dogs, and officials urged people not to release prairie dogs for fear of spreading the disease to other wildlife.

                  If the disease gets a foothold in indigenous North American species, it could become almost impossible to control, Foldy said.

                  "We don't want that happen," Foldy said. "It would have an unknown impact that I'd prefer not to find out."

                  The death rate from monkeypox in Africa ranges from 1 to 10 percent, he said. However, he said the mortality rate might not reach those levels in the United States, where people are typically better nourished and medical technology is more advanced.

                  "The person-to-person transmission in a rural Congolese setting is potentially very different than in a metropolitan American setting," Foldy said. "We have isolation, soap, running water, sterile dressing materials, we have washing machines. These are all things that have reduced the prevalence of germs that are spreadable by person-to-person contact."

                  Federal health officials believe the prairie dogs may have been infected with monkeypox by a Gambian rat at a Villa Park, Ill., pet distributor.

                  The owner of Phil's Pocket Pets has given Illinois officials a list of everyone who bought prairie dogs, Gambian rats or other exotic animals since April 15, according to the Illinois public health department. A telephone number for Phil's Pocket Pets could not be found Sunday.

                  South Milwaukee pet distributor SK Exotics purchased some of the prairie dogs and sold them to two pet stores in the Milwaukee area.

                  Mike Hoffer, owner of Hoffer TropicLife, said he got a shipment of 10 prairie dogs from SK Exotics on May 5 but didn't sell any after his staff noticed they were sniffling. Seven animals were euthanized Wednesday and the others died earlier of a respiratory ailment, he said.

                  He said he has sold 20 to 25 prairie dogs a year over the last decade.

                  "They're cute," Hoffer said. "They fall into place someplace between a guinea pig and a rabbit. I think people are maybe blowing it out of proportion."

                  ---
                  PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well it's still nothing to scoff at, but I think the Midwest EMT's and Doctor's are breathing a combined sigh of relief that it's not actually smallpox.
                    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

                    IACOJ

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      4 AM Update 6/9/03

                      MADISON, Wis. (AP) - A virus similar to smallpox apparently
                      jumped from an imported African rat to pet prairie dogs, infecting
                      what are feared to be dozens of people in three states and marking
                      the disease's first appearance in the Western Hemisphere.
                      Eighteen people in Wisconsin are suspected of suffering from the
                      monkeypox virus and four are confirmed, said City of Milwaukee
                      health commissioner Dr. Seth Foldy. At least 11 more cases in
                      Indiana and three in Illinois are suspected.
                      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Saturday the
                      prairie dogs likely were infected with the virus by a giant Gambian
                      rat, which is indigenous to African countries, at a suburban
                      Chicago pet distributor.
                      Thirteen of the people suspected of having the virus in
                      Wisconsin were around prairie dogs, while the other apparently
                      contracted it after handling a sick rabbit that had been around a
                      prairie dog. Foldy said it doesn't appear anyone contracted the
                      virus from another person.
                      Monkeypox in humans is not usually fatal, but causes rashes,
                      fevers and chills. Doctors initially feared they might be facing
                      smallpox, which causes similar symptoms, but scientists quickly
                      eliminated that possibility after discovering the link between
                      people and prairie dogs. Monkeypox's incubation period is about 12
                      days.
                      Two patients at Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital in
                      Milwaukee were in satisfactory condition Sunday, hospital spokesman
                      Mark McLaughlin said. The two were isolated and doctors wore caps,
                      gowns and masks whenever they interacted with them. Other suspected
                      victims were treated and released.
                      Health officials are trying to contain the virus' spread by
                      preventing more animals from becoming infected. Prairie dogs,
                      usually found in southwestern and western states, aren't indigenous
                      to Wisconsin.
                      Wisconsin's Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
                      Protection issued a warning telling people not to dump prairie dogs
                      into the wild, agency spokeswoman Donna Gilson said. The agency
                      also told state humane societies to isolate any prairie dogs people
                      bring in.
                      Monkeypox has been found mostly in west African nations, Foldy
                      said. The human mortality rate in Africa has ranged from one to 10
                      percent, but Foldy said the virus may be less lethal in the United
                      States because people are typically better nourished and medical
                      technology is far more advanced.
                      "We have isolation, soap, running water, sterile dressing
                      materials, we have washing machines," Foldy said. "These are all
                      things that have reduced the prevalence of germs that are
                      spreadable by person-to-person contact."
                      The prairie dogs were sold by a Milwaukee animal distributor in
                      May to two pet shops in the Milwaukee area and during a pet "swap
                      meet" in northern Wisconsin, the CDC said.
                      The Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services issued an
                      emergency order Friday banning the sale, importation and display of
                      prairie dogs. State agriculture officials plan to publish an
                      emergency rule this week, Gilson said.
                      The Illinois Department of Agriculture has prohibited Phil's
                      Pocket Pets, a pet distributor in Villa Park, Ill. where the
                      prairie dogs may have been infected, from selling animals until the
                      health of its animals is verified.
                      The owner of Phil's has given Illinois officials a list of all
                      who bought prairie dogs, Gambian rats or other exotic animals since
                      April 15, the Illinois Department of Public Health said. No
                      telephone listing could be found for the store Sunday.
                      Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich on Saturday signed an executive
                      order banning the sale, importation or display of prairie dogs or
                      Gambian rats. Veterinarians were urged to report suspected cases of
                      the disease.
                      Prairie dogs are burrowing herbivores that are commonly found in
                      western rangeland, but their popularity as pets has grown in recent
                      years. Last year 10,000 prairie dogs were shipped out of Texas to
                      become pets, said David Crawford, executive director of the Rocky
                      Mountain Animal Defense, a nonprofit organization that advocates
                      for animal freedom.
                      Tammy Kautzer's Dorchester farm in central Wisconsin has been
                      quarantined because she purchased two prairie dogs for pets during
                      the Wausau swap meet. Less than two weeks after the purchase, her
                      3-year-old daughter, Schyan, was bitten by one of the animals and
                      spent seven days in the hospital with a 103-degree fever, swollen
                      eyes and red bumps on her skin.
                      "It was getting a little scary. She wasn't doing well,"
                      Kautzer said. "Three days straight (in the hospital), she just
                      slept and cried. She'd tell me how scared she was."
                      Kautzer and her husband, Steve, also started to develop similar
                      red bumps, but the family is now recovering. The prairie dog that
                      bit the young girl has died. The other animal also became ill but
                      is recovering.
                      ---
                      On the Net:
                      CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r030607.htm
                      Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
                      Protection: http://datcp.state.wi.us/index.jsp

                      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        More Info

                        MADISON, Wis. (AP) - Tests have confirmed that four people in
                        Wisconsin contracted the monkeypox virus after coming into close
                        contact with pet prairie dogs, marking the first time the disease
                        has been discovered in the Western Hemisphere, health officials
                        said Sunday.
                        The findings at least partially confirm that monkeypox has
                        caused an outbreak of rashes, fevers and chills in people across
                        the upper Midwest since early May. Monkeypox is a viral infection
                        that is related to smallpox.
                        Fourteen more people in Wisconsin are suspected of suffering
                        from the virus, said Milwaukee Health Commissioner Dr. Seth Foldy.
                        At least 11 more cases in Indiana and three in Illinois are
                        suspected.
                        The outbreak stems from a batch of prairie dogs that came from a
                        pet distributor in suburban Chicago. It was there that the prairie
                        dogs may have been infected with monkeypox by a Gambian rat - a
                        rodent indigenous to African countries.
                        The detection of monkeypox in the United States represents a
                        highly unusual discovery. The virus has been found mostly in west
                        African nations - and had never before been seen in the Western
                        Hemisphere.
                        The human death rate in Africa has ranged from 1 to 10 percent,
                        but Foldy said the virus may be less lethal in the United States,
                        because people are typically better nourished and medical
                        technology is far more advanced.
                        "We have isolation, soap, running water, sterile dressing
                        materials, we have washing machines," Foldy said. "These are all
                        things that have reduced the prevalence of germs that are
                        spreadable by person-to-person contact."
                        Still, the disease could be almost impossible to control and
                        more people could become infected if it passes into other
                        indigenous North American animals, Foldy said.
                        Thirteen of the infected people were around prairie dogs; the
                        other apparently contracted it after handling a sick rabbit that
                        had been around a prairie dog. Foldy said it doesn't appear anyone
                        contracted the virus from another person.
                        Doctors initially feared they might be facing smallpox, which
                        causes similar symptoms, Foldy said.
                        But doctors and scientists quickly eliminated that possibility
                        after discovering the people-prairie dog link. Smallpox is found
                        only in humans and cannot be transmitted from animals to people,
                        Foldy said.
                        Four people, including one as an outpatient, have been treated
                        at Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital in Milwaukee. One has been
                        released and the remaining two were in satisfactory condition
                        Sunday, hospital spokesman Mark McLaughlin said.
                        "It eventually will clear up as you treat the symptoms,"
                        McLaughlin said. "We don't need people to go off the deep end."
                        Prairie dogs are burrowing herbivores that are commonly found in
                        western rangeland, but their popularity as pets has grown in recent
                        years. Last year 10,000 prairie dogs were shipped out of Texas to
                        become pets, said David Crawford, executive director of the Rocky
                        Mountain Animal Defense, a nonprofit organization that advocates
                        for animal freedom.
                        Wisconsin agriculture officials took steps Sunday to prevent the
                        possible spread of monkeypox from prairie dogs to other animals.
                        The state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection
                        issued a warning telling people not to dump prairie dogs into the
                        wild, agency spokeswoman Donna Gilson said.
                        The agency also told state humane societies to isolate any
                        prairie dogs people bring in.
                        The Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services issued an
                        emergency order Friday banning the sale, importation and display of
                        prairie dogs.
                        The Illinois Department of Agriculture has prohibited Phil's
                        Pocket Pets, the surburban Chicago pet distributor, from selling
                        animals until the health of its animals is verified.
                        Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich on Saturday signed an executive
                        order banning the sale, importation or display of prairie dogs or
                        Gambian rats. The owner of Phil's has given Illinois officials a
                        list of all who bought prairie dogs, Gambian rats or other exotic
                        animals since April 15, the Illinois Department of Public Health
                        said.
                        No telephone listing could be found for Phil's Pocket Pets
                        Sunday.
                        SK Exotics, a Milwaukee pet distributor, purchased some of the
                        infected prairie dogs and sold them to two pets stores in the
                        Milwaukee area. Importing and selling prairie dogs in Wisconsin is
                        legal.
                        More prairie dogs from Villa Park apparently found their way to
                        northern Wisconsin through a Wausau swap meet, said Dr. Mark
                        Wegner, chief of the Wisconsin Communicable Disease Epidemiology
                        Section.
                        Tammy Kautzer's farm in central Wisconsin has been quarantined
                        because she purchased two prairie dogs for pets from the Wausau
                        swap meet.
                        Less than two weeks after the purchase, her 3-year-old daughter,
                        Schyan, was bitten by one of the animals and spent seven days in
                        the hospital with a 103-degree fever, swollen eyes and red bumps on
                        her skin.
                        "It was getting a little scary. She wasn't doing well,"
                        Kautzer said. "Three days straight (in the hospital), she just
                        slept and cried. She'd tell me how scared she was."
                        Kautzer and her husband, Steve, also started to develop similar
                        red bumps, but they and their daughter are recovering.
                        Crawford said prairie dogs are too aggressive to make good pets.
                        "You're doing something that is in total disregard for the
                        natural order of things, bringing these animals out of their
                        communities and putting them in artificial environments," he said.
                        "It isn't a surprise to me that nature has this little surprise
                        waiting."
                        ---
                        On the Net:
                        Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
                        Protection: http://datcp.state.wi.us/index.jsp

                        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • #13


                          Press Release
                          June 7, 2003
                          Contact: CDC Media Relations
                          404-639-3286

                          Public Health Investigation Uncovers First Outbreak of Human Monkeypox Infection in Western Hemisphere
                          Public health officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the states of Wisconsin, Illinois and Indiana have reported the first outbreak of human infections with a monkeypox-like virus to be documented in the Western Hemisphere. Thus far, 19 cases have been reported: 17 in Wisconsin, one in Northern Illinois, and one in Northern Indiana. All patients who have become ill reported direct or close contact with ill prairie dogs.

                          CDC is advising physicians, veterinarians, and the public to report instances of rash illness associated with exposure to prairie dogs, Gambian rats and other animals to local and state public health authorities. CDC also has issued interim recommendations for infection control calling for health care personnel attending hospitalized patients to follow standard precautions for guarding against airborne or contact illness. Veterinarians examining or treating sick rodents, rabbits and such exotic pets as prairie dogs and Gambian rats are advised to use personal protective equipment, including gloves, surgical mask or N-95 respirator, and gowns.

                          The prairie dogs were sold by a Milwaukee animal distributor in May to two pet shops in the Milwaukee area and during a pet “swap meet” (pets for sale or exchange) in northern Wisconsin. The Milwaukee animal distributor obtained prairie dogs and a Gambian giant rat that was ill at the time from a northern Illinois animal distributor. Investigations are underway to trace the source of animals and the subsequent distribution of animals from the Illinois distributor. Preliminary information suggests that animals from this distributor may have been sold in several other states.

                          Human monkeypox is a rare, zoonotic, viral disease that occurs primarily in the rain forest countries of Central and West Africa. It is a member of the orthopox family of viruses. In humans, infection with monkeypox virus results in a rash illness similar to but less infectious than smallpox. Monkeypox in humans is not usually fatal. The incubation period is about 12 days. Animal species susceptible to monkeypox virus may include non-human primates, rabbits, and some rodents.

                          Scientists at the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, Wisconsin, recovered the first viral isolates from a patient and a prairie dog. Through examination with an electron microscope they demonstrated a poxvirus.

                          Physicians should consider monkeypox in persons with fever, cough, headache, myalgia, rash, or lymph node enlargement within 3 weeks after contact with prairie dogs or Gambian giant rats. Veterinarians examining sick exotic animal species, especially prairie dogs and Gambian giant rats, should consider the possibility of monkeypox. Veterinarians should also be alert to the development of illness in other animal species that may have been housed with ill prairie dogs or Gambian giant rats.

                          Local, state, and federal agencies and private institutions that have participated in this investigation to date have included the Marshfield Clinic and Marshfield Laboratories, Froedtert Hospital and Medical College of Wisconsin, the City of Milwaukee Health Department and at least 10 additional health departments in Wisconsin and Illinois, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture Trade and Consumer Protection and Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Illinois State Department of Agriculture, the Indiana State Department of Health, and the US Department of Agriculture.





                          CDC Monkeypox Info
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Exotic pets?

                            Originally posted by hwoods
                            , so why do we allow such stupidity to continue?
                            Oh, you could'nt send all the stupid people away, there are too many.
                            Plus, the U.S. would have a total population of maybe 150.
                            No longer an explorer, but I didn't wanna lose my posts.

                            IACOJ 2003

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hey, Chris............

                              Would the 150 be you, me, george, and 147 others? Stay Safe....
                              Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                              In memory of
                              Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                              Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                              IACOJ Budget Analyst

                              I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                              www.gdvfd18.com

                              Comment

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