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  • need help to prove a point.....

    We are currently looking into buying a new fire truck, we want crew cab pumper ( contender or something like that ) But we have to prove what the department benefits would be at the officers meeting and then (even worst) to the city meeting. I want to know how it helped your department to have a crew cab pumper. We are also thinking of putting our jaws of life on that truck. Please i really need your help.. Any stories, comments and/or feedback is really really welcomed.

    Thanks in advance for all stories, feedback and comments.

    Charle Chiasson
    FF, Fire Prevention Officer, Instructor

  • #2
    How about the obvious, crew safety as well as the public, in the cab you can be protected from rool over or falling out. Also you can put on equipment such as turn out gear. SCBA, as well as here instructions from officers or leaders prior to getting there. I am not positive but I also believe you can are not supposed to have any open cab trucks according to NFPA. Hope this helps.
    D.NELSON
    NREMTP,NAEMT, FF2
    Horry County Fire/Rescue
    Myrtle Beach, SC.
    FRATERNAL ORDER OF PARAMEDICS

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    • #3
      What do you currently respond with now?

      Showing up together and ready to work would be my point. The officer can give last minute instructions and you can get off the rig and work as a crew, without any confusion. Comercial vs custom their has been much discussion over the posts on that.

      Good luck

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      • #4
        We had a "civil disturbance"(riot)here in '96, the protection that those cabs gave us saved us from a lot of injuries, because they were torn to pieces from thrown debris.

        Comment


        • #5
          A whole lot depends on your area, department and
          SOGs -The plusses are fairly apparent. (packing
          up- officer planning ect) but their are some draw
          backs. Do you run tankers? A supply engine
          (hose wagon)? -A service truck? -If you roll out with
          5 or 6 0n board, will you have the manpower to respond
          other needed apparatus? Or will personell that might
          have driven POVs to the scene have to drive past the
          scene and get needed apparatus?- If the seats arent ful
          do you want to pay for the extra seats/length if not
          needed?
          ?

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          • #6
            I work in a Paid FD who run two enclosed custom cab pumpers, 1 open jumpseat custom pumper and one enclosed, 4 door, commercial pumper. I am a Volunteer Lieutenant in a department that runs an open jumpseat custom pumper and a brand new 4 door, enclosed cab, commercial pumper.
            Besides not being able to purchase an engine with the open facing rear seats anymore, the advantages to having a fully enclosed apparatus are too many to list.
            First off, you have 4+ seats, depending on how you've spec'd your appartus, to fit members. This is a plus in so many ways. You know who you've got riding. As a Company Officer (VFD), I want to know who's responding in my crew, know thier experiance and be able to divy out assignments. Our VFD has riding assignments but I may choose to make alternate assignments depending on who is riding where. If I've got two Boots, as we call them, riding in the attack seats, I may split them with two different senior members. I can do this from the Officers' seat easy in our enclosed cab engine, a Pierce with Kenworth Chassis. On our other engine, the two jumpseats are rear-facing and outside. We don't have any headphones or anything yet for them, so no making job assigments enroute. One thing that you don't plan on doing is getting turnedout while enroute to the call. Have all your PPE on before getting on the truck. Get your SCBA on before the engine leaves. Always be seat-belted in before you start moving.
            In the paid job where I'm the hose jockey, I prefer the enclosed cab to the open truck. We run 3 man engines. I can get my orders from my Captain as we're enroute. I can ask questions or clarify assignments. In the open cab truck, I ride in the back and can't hear anything, can't see anything and can only do so much thinking.
            I have a lesser chance of falling out of the rig if we were in a crash in the enclosed, 4-door trucks then the open rigs. How many documented cases are there of folks falling off the apparatus? In our department, if we had a 3 man engine, with no other seats, we'd have members standing around the station with no trucks to ride. We'd be short hands on scene.
            I personally suggest, after riding and working in a Freightliner, Kenworth and International commercial chassis trucks, to go with the Kenworth. It has much more room for the folks in back.

            *Mark
            FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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            • #7
              Can't leave out the Peterbuilts........... A neighboring full-time department just started replacing their Freightliners with the Peterbuilts and they love them.........
              The comments made by me are my opinions only. They DO NOT reflect the opinions of my employer(s). If you have an issue with something I may say, take it up with me, either by posting in the forums, emailing me through my profile, or PMing me through my profile.
              We are all adults so there is no need to act like a child........
              IACOJ

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              • #8
                Besides all of the reasons previously posted, consider the benefits of having a rehab. space. We have an E-ONE ten man cab and being able to take a break from extremely cold/hot weather is idle.


                Stay Safe

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                • #9
                  I will address the issue of having rescue tools on the engine. If you have a squad or other apparatus that has a complete set of rescue tools, I would suggest a combo tool for the engine. A combination cutter/spreader can handle many extrications. Why wait for the squad if your engine company can take the door before they get there.
                  "We shouldn't be opening firehouses in Baghdad and closing them in New York City."

                  IACOJ

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                  • #10
                    First you must prove the need. This shouldn't be difficult. But as a fellow resident of this warm in spirit, but freaking cold in winter country, I would not purchase a crew cab truck. Look into an enclosed panel truck. Seats 2 in the cab and either 3 or 4 in SCBA seats in with the transverse panel. Room to stand up to get in and out and just a much better setup IMHO. Climate controlled space for pump operator and for rehab for firefighters. Fort Garry builds these and has for some years. All ins and outs controlled from the panel. Check out www.fgiltd.com (or is it .ca) for a look. We don't own one, but strongly considering for our next truck. Only about 2 feet longer than a side panel crew cab and much roomier for crew. Good visibility from the panel. Our council was much easier to sell on this concept than a crewcab side control because of the benefits for the responding crew. As one councillor told us "If you were asking for another truck, just like the one you want to replace, I'd tell you to go to h***, but this concept makes sense. I like it and I'll back it." What more can you ask?
                    This is of course only my humble opinion, but then again, its likely the only one that matters.

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                    • #11
                      tgc

                      I think they have answered your questions for the most part. I would look long and hard at the 4-door customs over the 4-door commercials. They tend to have much shorter wheel bases and a tighter turning degree. The interior cab space of commercials won't even come close to the customs.


                      Capt.D

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                      • #12
                        When I worked on my first department we started replacing all of our old open cab pumpers with new enclosed pumpers. The first pumper they purchased was a Sutphen 6 man enclosed crew cab, with heat and a/c in cab for rehab in any climate. The pump was also side mounted but enclosed in a cabinet to protect it from the snow and salt that we get here in michigan. This was a very nice truck. The second one they purchased was a 5 man enclosed crew cab from pierce, had the same basic specs as the Sutphen. The third engine was a K.M.E. 6 man enclosed crew cab, again with the same basic specs as the Sutphen.
                        When you lined the three engines up together you could see the difference in quality just by looking at them, the Sutphen appeared to be the best pumper purchased. I have heard from my brother who is working there they are looking at replacing the Sutphen finally, the other two have already been replaced. I guess my answer would be to make sure to look for quality you are going to get what you pay for, I think everyone else has answered you question as to how to present important factors to the city and department....Good Luck and Stay Safe out there....

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