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  • And now for the December 22nd morning update.

    GREENBELT, Md. (AP) - An arson that destroyed part of a
    development with many black homeowners was "an effort to wipe out
    a community" and authorities are "very carefully investigating"
    whether the fires were a racial hate crime, a federal prosecutor
    said Tuesday.
    Assistant U.S. Attorney Donna Sanger said the suspects, "not
    all of whom are in custody at this time
    ," intended to "inflict as
    much damage as possible." Six men have been arrested, and
    authorities have said they have interviewed or plan to question
    about 10 more people who may be connected to the fires.
    The Dec. 6 fires destroyed 10 houses and damaged 16 others at
    the upscale Hunters Brooke development in the suburbs of
    Washington, much of which was still under construction.
    Investigators called it the largest residential arson in Maryland
    history.
    Sanger made her comments during a detention hearing for the
    first suspect arrested, Aaron L. Speed, 21, of Waldorf. A
    magistrate granted Sanger's request to keep Speed in custody until
    his trial.
    Speed's attorney, public defender John C. Chamble, called the
    government's case "extremely thin," saying there was no
    scientific or forensic evidence against his client.
    Speed and the five other suspects in custody - all young, white
    men - are charged with arson. None is charged with a hate crime.
    Investigators had said earlier that racism may have been a
    motive. A law enforcement source who spoke on condition of
    anonymity said two of the suspects made racial statements while
    talking to investigators.
    Two other motives have been suggested in court documents - a
    desire to gain notoriety for a local gang and revenge. The men
    allegedly described their plan to set the fires as "operation
    payback," Sanger said in court Tuesday.
    Michael E. Gilbert, 21, one of two suspects arrested Monday,
    acknowledged during interrogation that he knew about the arson plot
    in advance, according to an affidavit made public Tuesday. The
    document said he was also known as "White Mike."
    "Gilbert said that he was a member of 'the family,' also known
    as the 'Unseen Cavaliers,' a gang operating in Charles County,
    Md.," the documents said.
    "The leader of the 'family' is Patrick Walsh. Gilbert stated
    that approximately one month ago, Walsh approached Gilbert saying
    Walsh had a plan to make "the family bigger and more famous.'
    Walsh's plan had to do with setting 'something' on fire and that it
    would be big." Another defendant, Michael M. Everhart of Waldorf,
    said he overheard Walsh talk about a plan to burn down homes in
    Hunters Brooke, according to court documents.
    Walsh's attorney, William B. Purpura, denied the allegations in
    the affidavits.
    "He's not the head of any gang," Purpura told The Associated
    Press. He said he believes the name, Unseen Cavaliers, refers to
    cars. Walsh, who lives in Waldorf, owns a purple Chevrolet
    Cavalier. Court papers said trained dogs detected the scent of
    fire-starting chemicals on two of Walsh's cars, including the
    Cavalier.
    A Web site for a group called the UnSeen Cavaliers features a
    photo of a Chevrolet Cavalier on its opening page. It said the car
    club meets Wednesday evenings in Waldorf. It was not immediately
    clear if it was related to the group described by Gilbert and
    Purpura and phone calls, and e-mails to the group's organizers were
    not immediately returned.
    Walsh, Michael M. Everhart of Waldorf and Jeremy D. Parady of
    Accokeek, all 20, were arrested Saturday. Gilbert and Roy T. McCann
    Jr., 22, of Marbury, were arrested Monday.Speed, 21, of Waldorf, a
    security guard who worked at the construction site, was arrested
    Thursday.
    The official who spoke on condition of anonymity said Parady, a
    volunteer with a local fire department, unsuccessfully sought to
    get a job with Lennar Corp., the company building the houses. Speed
    allegedly told investigators that he was angry with his employer,
    Security Services of America, because company officials didn't
    treat him properly after one of his sons died this year.
    Initially, there was speculation the fires were set by
    environmental extremists because some critics had complained the
    houses threatened a nearby bog. But no evidence has been found to
    support that theory, police said.
    Walsh told authorities that he and Gilbert are distant cousins,
    while Gilbert told investigators that he is a distant cousin of
    Walsh and Everhart, according to court documents.
    Gilbert, of Fort Washington, and McCann appeared Tuesday in
    court and were ordered held pending detention hearings. Their
    attorneys declined to comment.
    Several of the suspects were interested in street racing and may
    have been members of an informal racing club, according to a law
    enforcement source who spoke on condition of anonymity.
    "A lot of them know each other from that club. That's one thing
    they had in common," the source said.
    Another affidavit said Everhart, Parady, Walsh and Speed, as
    well as unnamed "acquaintances," met at a Wendy's restaurant
    parking lot in Waldorf before they allegedly went to set the fires.
    Gilbert's girlfriend said he couldn't have been at the fires,
    which started during the early morning of Dec. 6. April Wilkinson,
    19, of Waldorf, said that after they ate at a restaurant together
    Dec. 5, they went back to her home and played cards until 7 a.m.
    the next morning, when Gilbert went to sleep.
    Stephanie Cave, a friend of Gilbert's, said she was also at the
    restaurant and played cards with Gilbert the night of the fires.
    She said she knows several of the suspects, and that they would
    meet on a regular basis at a Denny's restaurant to talk. Cave
    described the group as a "family." At one gathering, the members
    had dinner and talked. The topics included cars but not crime, she
    said.
    She said Walsh was a laid-back person who tried to stop fights.
    "Pat, he didn't like drama," she said. "He usually tried to
    stop it from happening."
    If convicted of arson, the men face a minimum prison sentence of
    five years each.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • Perhaps the most pathetic thing to come out of the Charles County incident so far, is that the turds seem to belong to a Chevy Cavalier Club! What type of a man celebrates the ultimate secretary-mobile?
      Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
      -Big Russ

      Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

      Originally posted by nyckftbl
      LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

      Comment


      • Walsh had a plan to make "the family bigger and more famous
        lot's of theories still going on...

        ultimate secretary-mobile
        Hey now! I liked my little Cavalier, then I used it for a drill and cut into many little pieces.
        "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Bones42


          Hey now! I liked my little Cavalier, then I used it for a drill and cut into many little pieces.
          It is fine to like the car you have, but to create a fan club for Cavaliers is like creating one for a K Car.
          Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
          -Big Russ

          Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

          Originally posted by nyckftbl
          LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

          Comment


          • Don't hate on the "K" Car! When I was 16 I bought one for 50 bucks and found $25.00 in the seats. It lasted me two years and it was a 1981. I delivered pizzas in it and made enough money to buy a Brand new 1995 Ford Escort GT (Ford's answer to the Cavalier and the K Car!)
            Proud Right-Wing Extremist since 1992

            "Extreme Liberalism is a Mental Disorder"- Michael Savage

            Comment


            • Here's the article from The Baltimore Sun

              From the Baltimore Sun

              Gang leader plotted arson, cousin claims
              Fires a bid for notoriety, suspect tells authorities; 10 homes destroyed, 16 damaged; 6 men held in blazes at Charles Co. development


              By Rona Kobell and Michael Dresser
              Sun Staff

              December 22, 2004


              One of the suspects in the arson that caused $10 million in damage to a Charles County subdivision told authorities that a local gang leader planned the blaze to increase notoriety for the group, known as the "Unseen Cavaliers."

              According to an affidavit made public yesterday, suspect Michael Gilbert told authorities that his cousin Patrick Walsh had approached him a month ago with a plan to make the gang - also known as "The Family" - "bigger and more famous." Gilbert identified Walsh as the leader of the gang and said the plan involved setting something on fire.

              Gilbert told authorities that on Dec. 3 - three days before the fires - Walsh approached him and said: "Look, you know something's going down, and it will probably be Sunday. I want you to know that this is your last chance. Do you want to be in on it or not?"

              Walsh, who most recently lived in Fort Washington, was arrested Saturday and charged with arson. Arrested the same day were 20-year-olds Jeremy Daniel Parady of Accokeek and Michael McIntosh Everhart of Waldorf.

              They joined Aaron L. Speed, 21, a security guard at the Hunters Brooke subdivision who was arrested last week in the fires. Speed was denied bail yesterday at a hearing in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt.

              On Monday, authorities arrested Gilbert, 21, of Fort Washington, and Roy T. "Brian" McCann, 22, of Waldorf. McCann is on probation after pleading guilty to a previous malicious destruction of property charge in July, according to court records.

              The group - which allegedly had been talking about setting the Hunters Brooke fires since August - called their plan "Operation Payback," according to court records.

              At least two of the six suspects apparently had grudges against companies affiliated with Hunters Brooke. Speed worked for Security Services of America, the company hired to guard the upscale subdivision, and was angry with his employers because he felt they were not sympathetic after his infant son died in April. Parady, a volunteer firefighter who works for an alarm company, reportedly tried and failed to get a job working on the construction site.

              Ten homes were destroyed and 16 damaged in the blaze set in the early-morning hours of Dec. 6. Investigators found that someone had attempted to set fires in 45 homes in the Indian Head subdivision, all of which were in various stages of construction and sold for about a half-million dollars apiece.

              U.S. Magistrate Charles B. Day denied a plea to let Speed go free on bail after Assistant U.S. Attorney Donna Sanger argued that the nature of the crime showed that Speed poses a continuing risk to the community. "This was not a random or impulsive act of juveniles," she said. "This was a well-planned, organized group of adults."

              Public defender John Chamble described the case against Speed as "extremely thin" and accused prosecutors of trying to build it into the "crime of the century." He said the fact nobody was hurt in the fires should be considered a mitigating factor.

              "As far as arsons go, quite frankly, if we want to keep it real, this is as benign as it gets," Chamble said.

              Sanger noted that most of the people who bought homes in Hunters Brooke are African-American, but backpedaled when Day asked whether the race of the prospective homeowners was relevant. The prosecutor said the government is being conservative about ascribing "ultimate motives" but is continuing to investigate that angle.

              In denying bail, Day said the fires posed a great risk to the community and to firefighters who responded to the alarm. After the ruling, Speed - who had watched impassively during the arguments - let his head slump to his chest.

              Gilbert, clean-shaven and with a close-cropped buzz cut, wore a long-sleeved undershirt that covered most of what appeared to be extensive tattoos. He answered quietly when asked if he understood the charges against him.

              McCann, sporting a thin strip of beard and a sweat shirt, answered with a firm "no, sir" when the judge asked if he was under the influence of any substance or had any mental disorder. Day ordered both men held pending a bail review tomorrow.

              Though the affidavit refers to the Unseen Cavaliers as a gang, authorities seemed to still be piecing together details about it. Police in Charles and Prince George's counties said they were not familiar with the group, which appears to have started as a club for aficionados of the popular Chevrolet car.

              The Unseen Cavaliers' Web site says the group is open to "any Cavalier owner who is just looking to chill with other Cavalier owners." The site says the group meets every Wednesday night at the parking lot of the Waldorf Wendy's -the same place where authorities say the arsonists met before dawn on the day of the fires to gather their gas cans and carpool to the subdivision.

              Gilbert was not the only suspect to point to Walsh as the instigator in the affidavit.

              Everhart told investigators that in August he joined Walsh, Gilbert and McCann at the Denny's in Waldorf. The group, according to Everhart, was talking about "how they wanted to burn things down and light fires."

              Everhart then said he overheard Walsh talk of burning down homes at Hunters Brooke.

              McCann allegedly told authorities of a discussion at Denny's a couple of months ago, where Walsh "stated that he was going to go off and just start blowing stuff up."

              McCann also said that an acquaintance called him on the night of the fires and told him Walsh was going to do "something stupid" at the new housing development off Route 225. McCann said he then traveled to Hunters Brooke and saw Walsh, Parady, Speed and Gilbert unloading what appeared to be bottles of laundry detergent.

              Walsh has denied any knowledge of or participation in the fires. But on Saturday, police dogs searched his two cars - a Chevrolet Lumina and his purple Cavalier - and found accelerants in both vehicles.

              Gilbert's mother, Christine Gilbert, told a reporter yesterday that her son was employed, but declined to say where he worked or what he did. She described him as "a good kid. He's a caring kid."

              None of the four Charles County suspects graduated from high school, according to county school officials. McCann dropped out in ninth grade; Everhart and Speed in 10th grade. Parady went to school until 12th grade but withdrew before his graduation.


              Two tiny quotes stand out:
              "As far as arsons go, quite frankly, if we want to keep it real, this is as benign as it gets," Chamble said.

              Chamble is the defense attorney. Benign arson? I guess the kazillion FF, police officers and EMS people who responded to this job were not really needed, were they? It would be interesting if this guy had an email address.

              None of the four Charles County suspects graduated from high school, according to county school officials. McCann dropped out in ninth grade; Everhart and Speed in 10th grade. Parady went to school until 12th grade but withdrew before his graduation.

              Fittin' the profile so far!
              PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

              Comment


              • "As far as arsons go, quite frankly, if we want to keep it real, this is as benign as it gets, Chamble said.”

                This caught my attention too George.

                You know, I believe in the accused having a vigorous defense but I also believe in the Judge using the “Stupid, Arrogant Bastard” stick on lawyers who say things like this.

                Bill.

                Comment


                • By GRETCHEN PARKER
                  Associated Press Writer
                  GREENBELT, Md. (AP) - Less than a month after a $10 million
                  fire-setting spree that was described as the state's largest-ever
                  residential arson, prosecutors announced Monday that five young men
                  have been indicted by a federal grand jury.
                  Interim U.S. Attorney Allen Loucks - hours after being sworn in
                  - made the announcement with top officials of five law enforcement
                  agencies at his side. But his declaration included no information
                  about the possible motives, including whether the fires were hate
                  crimes.
                  The suspects were indicted on identical charges of arson,
                  conspiracy to commit arson, and aiding and abetting.
                  Loucks didn't rule out the possibility that other arrests could
                  be made. The indictment alleges that the five suspects conspired
                  with each other "and with other persons known and unknown to the
                  grand jury." Loucks also wouldn't comment on why a sixth
                  defendant, Michael Gilbert, 21, was charged but not indicted and
                  whether he is cooperating with investigators.
                  Prosecutors have said they were looking into whether race was a
                  factor; many of the homeowners moving into the development were
                  black while those arrested were white men in their early 20s.
                  Investigators believe they've answered the questions of "who,
                  what, when and how," said Kevin Perkins, the FBI's special agent
                  in charge of Baltimore's field office. But, he added, "still
                  unknown is 'why'."
                  Those indicted are: Patrick Steven Walsh, 20, of Fort
                  Washington; Aaron Lee Speed, 21, of Waldorf; Michael McIntosh
                  Everhart, 20, of Waldorf; Jeremy Daniel Parady, 20, of Accokeek;
                  and Roy T. McCann, 22, of Marbury.
                  The indictment alleges that from about Aug. 1 to Dec. 6, when
                  the fires were set, the men conspired "to maliciously damage and
                  attempt to damage" the Hunters Brooke development under
                  construction near Indian Head in Charles County.
                  Speed was a security guard at the development and Parady served
                  as a volunteer firefighter. Walsh has been described as the leader
                  of the group, members of a street racing club known as The Family
                  and the Unseen Cavaliers. Investigators have said they believe the
                  fires were set primarily to gain notoriety for the group.
                  The penalty for arson and for conspiracy to commit arson ranges
                  from a mandatory minimum sentence of five years to a maximum of 20
                  years in prison and up to a $250,000 fine.
                  Loucks congratulated the multi-agency task force that tackled
                  the arsons, pointing out that "speedy arrests" were made within
                  10 to 14 days of the fires.
                  "The events of this case have really shocked us all," said
                  Loucks, an assistant U.S. attorney since 1994 who on Monday assumed
                  the duties of chief prosecutor for 120 days or until a replacement
                  is named.
                  David McCain, assistant special agent in charge for the federal
                  Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and Explosives, credited a
                  "strong partnership, a common goal and good, old-fashioned police
                  work".
                  Officials at his side said they hope the indictments will bring
                  a sense of relief to the community surrounding the burned-out
                  housing development.
                  "I personally feel comfortable they are safe," said Charles
                  County Sheriff Frederick Davis. "Is there a small chance something
                  could happen? Yes."
                  Several Charles County sheriff's deputies have been hired
                  part-time by the builder to patrol the development.

                  (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • LOS ANGELES (AP) - A graduate student convicted in the $2
                    million firebombing of scores of sport utility vehicles lost a bid
                    Monday for a new trial.
                    A federal judge rejected the motion by 24-year-old William
                    Jensen Cottrell, the U.S. attorney's office said.
                    Cottrell had claimed the court improperly barred his attorneys
                    from presenting evidence that he suffered from a type of autism
                    that made it difficult for him to understand the intentions of his
                    alleged accomplices.
                    U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner sided with prosecutors, who
                    argued that Cottrell's complaint was "irrelevant to the issues at
                    trial."
                    Cottrell, a doctoral candidate at the California Institute of
                    Technology in Pasadena, was found guilty in November of conspiracy
                    to commit arson and seven counts of arson in the August 2003
                    rampage.
                    More than 100 vehicles were damaged or destroyed at dealerships
                    and homes in the San Gabriel Valley near Los Angeles by vandals who
                    spray-painted "polluter" and "ELF," an acronym for the radical
                    environmental group Earth Liberation Front, on some of the
                    vehicles.
                    Cottrell blamed the arson on accomplices. Two fellow students
                    have been identified by prosecutors as "fugitive
                    co-conspirators."
                    Cottrell is to be sentenced March 7. He faces at least five
                    years in prison, according to prosecutors.

                    APTV 01-03-05 2245EST
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • By DAN NEPHIN
                      Associated Press Writer
                      PITTSBURGH (AP) - On New Year's Day two years ago, the Earth
                      Liberation Front, a radical environmental group, claimed
                      responsibility for igniting several trucks and sport utility
                      vehicles at an auto dealership - the fourth and last known attack
                      in northwestern Pennsylvania in the preceding year.
                      No one has ever been charged and eco-terrorism experts say it's
                      unlikely that anyone will.
                      "Unless somebody squeals or somebody got a license place
                      number, they're probably not going to get caught," said Gary
                      Perlstein, an eco-terrorism expert and professor emeritus at
                      Portland State University.
                      Gerald Clark Jr., acting supervisory special agent of the FBI's
                      Erie office, remains optimistic. Agents "continue to follow leads
                      that we feel have potential in the investigation," he said
                      Wednesday.
                      Law enforcement outside Pennsylvania had identified Michael J.
                      Scarpitti as a suspect in one of the other attacks, the Aug. 11,
                      2002, fire at a U.S. Forest Service research station near Warren.
                      Clark said he couldn't confirm or deny whether Scarpitti was a
                      suspect in that blaze, which caused $700,000 damage.
                      Scarpitti, who has said trees told him to change his name to Tre
                      Arrow, was convicted last year of shoplifting in Victoria, British
                      Columbia, and remains in jail there. He is wanted for his alleged
                      role in the 2001 firebombing of logging and cement trucks in
                      Oregon, but is fighting extradition.
                      Clark acknowledged that ELF is a difficult group to investigate.
                      In October, a joint terrorism task force was created to enable
                      local and federal law enforcement to combine resources and
                      intelligence to combat terrorism, which should help, he said.
                      ELF's lack of structure makes infiltration difficult and it
                      doesn't announce when or where attacks will occur, according to
                      eco-terrorism experts and law enforcement.
                      Members are anonymous, claiming membership by simply carrying
                      out an action under the group's name and guidelines. The group uses
                      the Internet to communicate and broadcast its message, but its Web
                      site has been down for about the past six months, said Kelly
                      Stoner, executive director of Stop Eco-Violence, a Portland, Ore.,
                      group that tracks environmental violence.
                      ELF claimed responsibility for four attacks in the Erie area.
                      Besides the vehicle torching at Bob Ferrando's dealership in Girard
                      and the research station fire, ELF took credit for torching a
                      $500,000 construction crane at a bridge work site in Erie and
                      setting fire to a mink barn outside Erie.
                      The acts were part of ELF's campaign to battle commercialism and
                      industry in the name of saving the environment.
                      Members carry out their assaults individually or in groups of
                      three to five trusted allies, reducing the chance of being caught,
                      Perlstein said.
                      Because the Erie area attacks happened in a narrow time span,
                      Perlstein said it's likely whoever was responsible was a high
                      school or college student who's since graduated and moved.
                      In the few cases in which someone has been caught, Stoner said,
                      they've tended to be local. But, she said, ELF is savvy and members
                      could well float from place to place.
                      As for Ferrando, he said the fire cost him nothing more than
                      some paperwork because his insurer covered the losses.
                      But the activities do bother him and worry him that someone may
                      get hurt, he said.
                      So far, ELF hasn't intentionally harmed anyone, but firefighters
                      and other first responsders are put in risk with each fire, said
                      Harvey W. Kushner, chair of the criminal justice department at Long
                      Island University and author of "Encyclopedia of Terrorism."
                      The group hasn't ruled out violence. In a communique issued
                      after the research station fire, ELF said: "While innocent life
                      will never be harmed in any action we undertake, where it is
                      necessary, we will no longer hesitate to pick up the gun to
                      implement justice."
                      Kushner said ELF's methods aren't working.
                      More vehicles are built to replace those destroyed and more
                      trees are cut to replace lumber destroyed when ELF sets fire to
                      housing developments, he said.

                      (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • More search warrants released in Charles fires case


                        GREENBELT, Md. (AP) - Federal search warrants show that
                        investigators removed computers, computer disks and other items
                        from the homes and cars of several men accused in the Charles
                        County arsons.
                        Investigators removed two computers and dozens of C-D-ROMs and
                        floppy disks from the Accokeek home of Jeremy Parady. They also
                        took a laptop from the van he drove for work.
                        At the Fort Washington home of Patrick Walsh, the alleged
                        ringleader of the group, investigators removed computers, cameras,
                        a video camera, lighters, a safe, spray paint and financial
                        documents. They also found a police badge.
                        The items were listed on federal search warrants made public
                        today.
                        The fires in Indian Head last month caused ten (m) million
                        dollars in damage. Six men were arrested and charged with arson.

                        (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • ELF-ALF

                          By DON THOMPSON
                          Associated Press Writer
                          SACRAMENTO (AP) - The second attempted firebombing of buildings
                          under construction in nearby communities northeast of Sacramento
                          was thwarted Wednesday, and the FBI said eco-terrorism is suspected
                          as a motive.
                          Construction workers discovered five firebombs early Wednesday
                          at a business in Auburn, incendiary devices of the same manufacture
                          as those found Dec. 27 at an upscale Lincoln subdivision a few
                          miles away. All the devices were disabled without causing damage.
                          The accelerant in all eight devices was a combination of
                          gasoline and red dye diesel fuel commonly used in farm machinery,
                          said FBI Special Agent in Charge Keith Slotter. Timing devices on
                          all eight devices also were similar, he said.
                          "We're leaning toward eco-terrorism," Slotter said, though no
                          one has claimed responsibility.
                          Graffiti at the Lincoln homes is similar to that left at other
                          eco-terror targets. Messages included "U will pay," "Quit
                          destroying their homes," "Evasion" and "Leave," along with the
                          name of a short-lived 1980s rock band, 4Q, that favored crude and
                          violent lyrics and behavior.
                          The bombs were found in a development at Twelve Bridges, a
                          golf-oriented, master-planned community in Lincoln. As many as 60
                          homes are under construction in the area, Lincoln police said.
                          There had been some controversy over the Auburn office complex'
                          development because of the destruction of old trees.
                          Eco-terrorists have targeted new construction in ecologically
                          sensitive areas in the past. However, similar initial suspicions
                          last month about the largest residential arson in Maryland history
                          proved unfounded.
                          The Lincoln and Auburn construction involved different
                          contractors, both commercial and residential property, and were in
                          different, though nearby, communities, making motives such as
                          revenge by an employee or neighbor unlikely, Slotter said.
                          No graffiti or other apparent message was left at the targeted
                          office complex being built in Auburn, in the Sierra Nevada
                          foothills northeast of Sacramento and southeast of Lincoln.
                          No witnesses to either incident have surfaced, but the FBI and
                          federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives asked
                          anyone with knowledge to contact the Joint Terrorism Task Force,
                          made up of federal, state and local law enforcement.
                          The devices found in the recent incidents have not been linked
                          to other attempted arsons, Slotter said.
                          Two McDonald's restaurants were targeted with crude firebombs in
                          2003 in Chico, north of Sacramento. The Animal Liberation Front
                          claimed responsibility for those attempted arsons, part of a
                          nationwide series targeting the fast-food giant.

                          (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                          Comment


                          • Charles County Arson

                            The investigation stories regarding Charles County will be posted under "Investigation/Mitigation" threads

                            It appears, at this point, that the multiple residential arsons were not ELF/ALF related.
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

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                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                            Comment


                            • ELF News

                              By ELIZABETH M. GILLESPIE
                              Associated Press Writer
                              SEATTLE (AP) - When ecoterrorists firebombed the University of
                              Washington's Center for Urban Horticulture nearly four years ago,
                              they thought they were targeting a researcher who was genetically
                              engineering trees.
                              They were wrong.
                              Biology professor Toby Bradshaw was simply studying the genetics
                              of hybrid poplar trees that had been cross-pollinated - a method
                              scientists have used for centuries to unlock basic clues to how
                              plants grow.
                              The May 21, 2001, fire destroyed his lab and gutted much of
                              Merrill Hall, obliterating decades of work and records for some
                              teachers and causing more than $3 million in damage.
                              Now the university is ready to open a new $7.2 million building
                              designed to highlight the center's focus on environmental
                              conservation - with everything from solar panels and a stormwater
                              recycling system to low-flush toilets and furniture made from
                              salvaged city trees.
                              The center has applied for the U.S. Green Building Council's
                              seal of approval, known as Leadership in Energy and Environmental
                              Design (or LEED) certification, and expects to get the final say on
                              its rating later this year.
                              "Three and a half years ago, I thought a "green building" had
                              to be painted green, so we've come a long way since then," Sue
                              Nichol, a spokeswoman for the center, said Tuesday, a day before
                              the building's scheduled dedication.
                              It also has a state-of-the-art fire protection system - with
                              sprinklers both inside and outside - and a tighter security system.
                              Bradshaw won't be doing his research in the new building. He
                              found a new home for his lab in a biology building across campus
                              soon after the fire, while most of his colleagues have spent the
                              last few years working out of trailers.
                              Bradshaw said he feels for colleagues who lost so much. He had
                              extra copies of crucial data and his stocks of DNA and seeds were
                              in refrigerators that suffered minimal smoke and water damage.
                              "Even though I was the main target, it was little more than a
                              bump in the road for me - which is one of the many ironies
                              surrounding this whole thing," Bradshaw said.
                              The Earth Liberation Front, a group that has carried out
                              sabotage against targets it deems to be threats to the environment,
                              claimed responsibility for the fire at the horticulture center. The
                              ELF also said it was responsible for a fire lit the same day at a
                              tree farm in Clatskanie, Ore., that grew hybrid poplar trees -
                              which produce large amounts of wood on a small area of land, for
                              paper-making.
                              In an anonymous statement, ELF wrote that the attacks were blows
                              against research and industry that it characterized as "an
                              ecological nightmare" to the diversity of native forests.
                              The FBI is offering a $50,000 reward for information leading to
                              arrests and convictions in both fires. The investigation been a
                              challenge, FBI spokeswoman Robbie Burroughs said, since groups like
                              ELF run shadowy operations.
                              "There's no membership list. There's no headquarters. ... It's
                              not a movement. It's an ideology," Burroughs said.
                              At a preview of the building on Tuesday, John Wott, the
                              horticulture center's acting director, did more bragging about the
                              new building than dwelling on the past.
                              He showed off a conference room with a table made of polished
                              slabs of ash that might otherwise have been chucked into a
                              landfill. Four gnarled slabs of a taxus yew chopped down as it was
                              dying hung decoratively on one wall.
                              In a nearby room, Wott opened pointed to cabinets made of
                              "strawboard" - a plywood-like material made from straw salvaged
                              from sunflower fields in North and South Dakota.
                              On the other side of the room, cubicles made of birdseye maple
                              came from a law firm that had planned to throw them away.
                              Professor Sarah Reichard, a conservation biologist who lost
                              clones of rare plants in the fire, is still playing catch-up.
                              "It's going to take some time before we're back to where we
                              were," she said, looking relieved to be moving into her new lab.
                              Looking back on the attack, Bradshaw has harsh words for the
                              arsonists who targeted him.
                              "It's basically abysmal ignorance of science," he said. "It's
                              really sad. With the availability of information today ... you have
                              to assume it's willful ignorance."
                              ---
                              On the Net:
                              http://depts.washington.edu/urbhort/

                              (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                              Comment


                              • ELF's cousin....ALF

                                SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - The second man who admitted setting fire
                                to a farm building at Brigham Young University on behalf of an
                                animal rights group has been sentenced to 2 1/2 years in prison.
                                Joshua Stephen Demmitt, 19, was sentenced Tuesday to the prison
                                term as well as two years of supervised release when the term is
                                up.
                                He could have been sentenced to up to 20 years in prison after
                                pleading guilty to destruction of property by fire for the July 8
                                blaze at BYU's Ellsworth Farm on the Provo campus.
                                Damage was estimated at $30,000.
                                In an earlier statement to the court, Demmitt admitted to
                                pouring gasoline on bound cardboard in a storage shed and lighting
                                it on fire.
                                "We started the fires to make a political statement on behalf
                                of the Animal Liberation Front," the statement read.
                                ALF is an animal-rights group that has been linked in the past
                                to other crimes.
                                Harrison David Burrows, 18, who admitted to starting the fire
                                with Demmitt, was sentenced to the same prison term on Jan. 10.
                                (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

                                APTV 01-18-05 2316EST
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                                Comment

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