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  • #31
    New York State law says that when your lights are on, your siren is on.

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    • #32
      I would like to thank each and everyone of you that replied to my question. Yes my Department does you due regard to life limb and property of the citizens that we protect as well as our own members. We do stop at the 4 traffic signals in our small town and ask for the right of way, we stop at stop signs to make sure John Doe and his family is not there in our way and we necessary we do proceed above the posted speed but in a controled much regard for safety speed. Again thanks for the replies God bless each and every one of you, be safe out there. And TCFD1 I really wasnt keeping count!!!

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      • #33
        I would like to thank each and everyone of you that replied to my question. Yes my Department does you due regard to life limb and property of the citizens that we protect as well as our own members. We do stop at the 4 traffic signals in our small town and ask for the right of way, we stop at stop signs to make sure John Doe and his family is not there in our way and when necessary we do proceed above the posted speed but in a controled much regard for safety speed. Again thanks for the replies God bless each and every one of you, be safe out there. And TCFD1 I really wasnt keeping count!!!

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        • #34
          Two comments from me:
          1. I was told a few years ago that the siren is the best public relation device you have. It lets everyone know you are on the job so they cannot say all you do is just sit around. Not saying I agree or just disagree.

          2. When responding to a call it enables the victims to know help is on the way. This may prevent injury or death because it may keep them from re-entering a burning building to attempt to remove something (property, pet, or human).

          Just a few comments you have to make up your own mind.

          Noticied I left out the civil liability part..that varies depending on where you are.

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          • #35
            Here in the middle of the night, the only reason we set our siren off if it's a reported structure fire, or if we are ahving a manpower problem. As for the truck sirens, there are some businesses on the main drag thru town that if they are still open, we'll use the truck sirens. Otherwise, it's a silent run out to the highway.

            ------------------
            JMK271
            ***Stay safe out there***
            ***These opinion(s) are my own, and not that of the department in which I serve***

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            • #36
              I think that the main thing is to stay calm when responding to calls. Just use some COMMON SENSE. We all want to get there as safely and as quickly as possible!!

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              • #37
                My home is a very rural area. In that situation, we go lights only at 0200, but at college ( in a large urban area ) sirens all the time.

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                • #38
                  Comming out of our remote house, we hit the lights which are extremely substancial...when we approach an intersection the electronic siren gets hit a few times and we roll on through.

                  After midnight we do not use the Q (or federal depending on where your from) because it takes them too long to wind down.


                  See yall at the Big one...


                  ------------------
                  Rescue Squad #2
                  "First In ~ Last Out"

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by BayRidge60:
                    New York State law says that when your lights are on, your siren is on.

                    Umm, just which section, sub-section and paragraph of the NYS V&T laws are you referring to that states this?

                    Is that your final answer or would you like to phone a friend.

                    The law actually states that you must sound "as may be reasonably necessary".

                    Article 23, section S1104c


                    (c) Except for an authorized emergency vehicle operated as a police
                    vehicle or bicycle, the exemptions herein granted to an authorized emer-
                    gency vehicle shall apply only when audible signals are sounded from any
                    said vehicle while in motion by bell, horn, siren, electronic device or
                    exhaust whistle as may be reasonably necessary, and when the vehicle is
                    equipped with at least one lighted lamp so that from any direction,
                    under normal atmospheric conditions from a distance of five hundred feet
                    from such vehicle, at least one red light will be displayed and visible.

                    You can read the whole section here
                    http://assembly.state.ny.us/cgi-bin/...law=128&art=47

                    A little research goes a long way.

                    [This message has been edited by iwood51 (edited 02-05-2001).]

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                    • #40
                      I think there is some confusion between the NYS V&T laws and the NYS DOH directive on EVOC for ambulances. The DOH states that if the lights are on, and they should only be on if you are transporting a unstable or critical patient, then the siren is on as well. So far as I know this does not apply to Fire Apparatus, only ambulances. I am not sure how I feel about this issue. I guess if the traffic is light and it is o'dark thirty use common sense. But if there are people on the roads and you have your lights on you should be letting them know that you are coming with your sirens as well.

                      This is my opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of my department.

                      ------------------
                      Shawn M. Cecula
                      Captain
                      Lewiston Fire Co. No. 2

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Turk... Not to pick on you, but how can a driver be in "complete control" of a vehicle if a hand must be removed from the wheel to sound a siren or air horn (especially considering the size, weight, and slow responses to driver input that some apparatus have)? Not trying to preach, just a thought...

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                        • #42
                          We use the lights and sirens on all runs, regardless of the time of day or night. In Texas there is no such thing as Code Two for fire vehicles. We have a lot of late-night joggers in our area and they usually run in the street. We have recieved complaints about our air raid siren, usually from people across the creek from it in the next city, but our own citizens never have a problem with it once we explain it to them.

                          ------------------
                          Be safe.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Lewiston2Capt:
                            I think there is some confusion between the NYS V&T laws and the NYS DOH directive on EVOC for ambulances. The DOH states that if the lights are on, and they should only be on if you are transporting a unstable or critical patient, then the siren is on as well. So far as I know this does not apply to Fire Apparatus, only ambulances. I am not sure how I feel about this issue. I guess if the traffic is light and it is o'dark thirty use common sense. But if there are people on the roads and you have your lights on you should be letting them know that you are coming with your sirens as well.

                            This is my opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of my department.


                            I would ***-u-me that any directive from the NYS DOH (New York State Department Of Health) would be a directive that pertains to ambulances and not to firetrucks.
                            There was asection in the V&T laws that referenced ambulances. I will check that at another time. I only researched what I did, to counteract a very generalized statement, and that poster did use the words NYS Law, so I went to the V&T laws, not to directives from the Department Of Health.

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                            • #44
                              If i gotta be up at night so should everyone else. and you never know when a car will come from a side street.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                In my dept. during the late night and early morning hours we will run lights only to a call, unless we come upon traffic or a dangerous intersection or curve. The reason we run lights is so the other follow on companies can see where we are. Plus that amber light that we are required to have on the back cuts through fog much better than the reds and whites. So basicly the only reason we run lights at night is to help the other units keep track of where everybody is at. After all if you are going to a call at 3am, take a sharp curve too fast and roll over down an enbankment, and you do not have your lights on, what are the chances that a follow on unit will notice you are missing you untill they get to the scene.

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