Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Noise at Night

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Two comments from me:
    1. I was told a few years ago that the siren is the best public relation device you have. It lets everyone know you are on the job so they cannot say all you do is just sit around. Not saying I agree or just disagree.

    2. When responding to a call it enables the victims to know help is on the way. This may prevent injury or death because it may keep them from re-entering a burning building to attempt to remove something (property, pet, or human).

    Just a few comments you have to make up your own mind.

    Noticied I left out the civil liability part..that varies depending on where you are.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I would like to thank each and everyone of you that replied to my question. Yes my Department does you due regard to life limb and property of the citizens that we protect as well as our own members. We do stop at the 4 traffic signals in our small town and ask for the right of way, we stop at stop signs to make sure John Doe and his family is not there in our way and when necessary we do proceed above the posted speed but in a controled much regard for safety speed. Again thanks for the replies God bless each and every one of you, be safe out there. And TCFD1 I really wasnt keeping count!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I would like to thank each and everyone of you that replied to my question. Yes my Department does you due regard to life limb and property of the citizens that we protect as well as our own members. We do stop at the 4 traffic signals in our small town and ask for the right of way, we stop at stop signs to make sure John Doe and his family is not there in our way and we necessary we do proceed above the posted speed but in a controled much regard for safety speed. Again thanks for the replies God bless each and every one of you, be safe out there. And TCFD1 I really wasnt keeping count!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    New York State law says that when your lights are on, your siren is on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    It is late at night and we get a run, On our heavy traffic main streets like Hunington, Duarte Road, and Foothill we will use the sirens there are not very many homes located along these streets once we hit a residential area we will kill the siren and roll red lights, If we are not sure where the address is or we come upon an intersection will give a brief blast of the siren to let people know we are coming ,

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I strongly disagree with routinely using emergency lights simply because you're on the road.

    It is sending mixed messages to the public. Either you are responding in emergency mode to an emergency, or you aren't.

    If you're parked obstructing traffic, sure turn 'em on. If there are extenuating circumstances where the lighting is needed to protect people around the vehicle, then turn them on. But if you are driving with the flow of traffic, I don't think it behooves us to use EMERGENCY lights for non-emergent responses. Just my opinion.

    [This message has been edited by Resq14 (edited 01-03-2001).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This brought to mind another practice I sometimes do where I will use the lights and not the sirens. Especially when I am operating the squad. As we all know, most of the time we don't need the lights and siren when we are transporting a stable patient to the hospital. In fact, this is often a detriment to the patient. However, during inclement weather with bad road conditions or heavy fog, I will sometimes turn on the emergency lights while obeying the traffic laws. The purpose of this is just a little more insurance that others on the road will see the unit and hopefully be a little more cautious around it. I think this philospohy would also hold true of the late night response where you obey the laws while using only your emergency lights. I have also heard of departments that have a "lights-on" policy anytime an apparatus is in motion.... does anyone on here do it that way?



    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by SteamTrain:
    The more folks we wake up, the more likely they are to shoot or cut somebody, the more likely we are to go on another call later.
    Shoot or cut??????
    What in gods name does that mean?
    If you wake people up, they're going to go out and commit crimes????

    Damn....
    Just what kind of an area do you work in?



    [This message has been edited by BFD FF 27 (edited 01-03-2001).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    In my dept. there is a asst. chief who won't use the sirens i can recall atleast 3 times whre a accident was almost caused because of us pulling up to a intersetion late at night and him not using the siren. the cars see a big *** lime green fire truck coming and slam on the brakes, or almost us. and it was late at night. i think that if you going to a emergency call use the lights always, at late night calls use common sense with the sirens. intersections or traffic. not small side streets. i admit sometimes late at night i get the attitude that if i'm up, everyone else is up.

    ------------------
    This is your brain... Pierce
    This is your Brain on drugs..... E-One

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Gill:

    I see where some of you are coming from and your reasons for only using the lights in residential neighborhoods late at night. Late at night, most people are sleeping. Most pedestrian and civilian drivers should be able to see the flashing lights, and you won't be waking most of the residents. Yes, this is a courteous act. At the same time, the driver should be driving cautiously, looking out for those who may have their head up their butt.

    Whether you leave the lights on with no siren, turn them off when the siren goes off, or run everything--it doesn't matter much.

    If you are driving cautiously through a quiet residential neighborhood at 2am, and you don't feel there is a need for sirens, why is there a need for lights? To warn pedestrians that...? To warn civilian drivers that...? If you're driving so CAUTIOUSLY through a neighborhood, what are the warning lights for?

    WHAT IS THE POINT?

    I'm not trying to be argumentative, and I'm not saying it's wrong. I just don't understand what people are thinking. And I get the impression that we do it simply because that's the way it's been done in the past. No one has explained why they feel driving around with the red lights blinking is necessary at 3am "when no traffic is on the road and you are going through a small town that rolls up its streets at 8pm." This probably isn't the fire service's most pressing issue, but I'm curious why it's done.

    What exactly are you trying to warn people about? That you're out driving cautiously late at night? I'm assuming when you think you have a "big" call late at night you use sirens as you expedite your response. Yes/No?

    imho, if you don't need the siren, you don't need the lights. If you don't need the lights, you don't need the siren. I'm not down with "quasi-emergency responses." I'm all for courtesy, but when you shut your siren off, why not just shut off the lights too?


    [This message has been edited by Resq14 (edited 01-03-2001).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I agree that the siren does not need to be used all the time during middle of the night responses for my engine company. But that's just mine. Other's districts may warant it.

    I see where some of you are coming from and your reasons for only using the lights in residential neighborhoods late at night. Late at night, most people are sleeping. Most pedestrian and civilian drivers should be able to see the flashing lights, and you won't be waking most of the residents. Yes, this is a courteous act. At the same time, the driver should be driving cautiously, looking out for those who may have their head up their butt.

    Whether you leave the lights on with no siren, turn them off when the siren goes off, or run everything--it doesn't matter much. In the wee hours of the morning in a residential neighborhood, the aggresiveness of the driver probably will not change. As long as the driver has control of his rig at all times, all should be fine.

    My engine company runs it's lights and sirens all the time. No matter what time of day or night. That's just the way we do it. That doesn't mean that's the way YOU have to do it. The fact of the matter is, there are rules that each State, County, City, and/or department have. Whether those rules are followed is up to the individual. Everyone just needs to understand that there are consequences to be dealt with in the event that the rules are broken and something bad happens.

    ------------------
    I LOVE THIS JOB!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Many aeromedical services prohibit telling the pilot of the helicopter the nature of the emergency to which they're responding.

    The rationale: they don't want the pilot to take unnecessary risks by flying in inclement weather, flying dangerously, etc.

    What a concept. Granted, we're still rolling the trucks if it's hailing. And having a fender bender in the sky is a bit different than on the ground. But I still find the concept intriguing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I consider proceeding through a stoplight -- even after coming to a complete stop -- to be "running a stoplight." I also consider this to be the responsible and safe way to proceed through a stoplight. It can be done with "due regard" by stopping or coasting slowly through to assure a clear passage, or it can be done in a maniacal kind of way. I'm sure we've all experienced both types and everything in between.

    Emergency vehicles are permitted to exceed the speed limit, go past traffic control devices, drive left of center, drive against the flow of traffic with audible and visual warning devices activated. They must use "due regard" for road, weather, and traffic conditions, and must be responding on an emergency call. Station coverage, imho, is hardly an emergency call. This goes back to call prioritization.

    I don't think anyone was condoning blistering through controlled intersections at warp factor 4.

    In many states, the law is that traffic will yield to emergency vehicles emitting audible and visual warning devices by pulling to the right side of the road and coming to a complete stop. That is the law. These same laws also exempt emergency vehicle responses from some of the normal rules of the road. Of course we'd all be fools to think that everyone will always obey the law, and that accidents don't happen. I'm not saying that at all. As operators, we play it on the safe side and assume people don't see or hear us, and that they won't be yielding. I agree, this is the way to be.

    As far as knowing your area and using the siren for identified danger zones, I'd be more worried about the unknown than the known.

    tc1chief, i think you misinterpreted me. All my posts here have agreed with metalmedic. When I said that I didn't think sirens were necessary late at night, I wasn't saying drive with just your lights on. I was saying if you are not going to exceed the speed limit, go past traffic control devices, drive left of center, or drive against the flow of traffic then WHY HAVE YOUR LIGHTS ON AT ALL? Do people just like to drive around with the pretty red lights on? Seems almost as bad as wanting to "play with the siren!"

    The larger issue is how we determine what is an emergency, and what isn't. Risk vs. benefit... why are we driving lights and sirens to station coverage? Is a broken ankle worthy of a "hot" response? Does the risk outweigh the benefit? When you are operating lights and sirens, how much time are you really saving if you're stopping at all traffic control devices and driving the posted speed?

    Most times, the decision of "hot" or "cold" (or less desirably, something in between) is based on tradition, instinct, or flying by the seat of your driver's (or officer's) pants. I wouldn't want to try to explain any of those in front of a judge, jury, and prosecutor. Your department should have call responses predetermined so people aren't guessing "should we turn the siren on" or "maybe we just need lights" etc.

    [This message has been edited by Resq14 (edited 01-02-2001).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This is a good topic, some of you people scare me, red lights and sirens do not give anyone the right to run red lights and stop signs I do not care what the law says. Go ahead and just out right run a red light and hit someone and see what the law says. When I approach an intersection with a stop sign or red light I ALWAYS bring my vehicle to a complete stop or almost a complete stop until I see I have a clear passage, I am asking for the right to pass through the intersection, the vehicles that have the green has the right of way. Usually I am seen by oncoming traffic before I'm heard, don't forget the sound of our sirens are sounding strait ahead of our units not around corners. I have witnessed alot of emergency vehicle drivers blow right through stop signs and red lights without even slowing down, I'd like to grab those people by the neck and set them straight. I have seen many companies in my area respond red lights and siren to stand-bys, I have never figured out what the hurry is to get to the station to just sit. I've even talked to some of the drivers that I've seen do that and they get mad at me for bringing it up, what if a fire broke out before they got to the station is what some tell me, go figure. To listen to some of you people you sound like them. Yes at night I use the siren a little less than durring the day, I know my area and know where my danger spots are to use the siren. sorry for venting alittle hear but are jobs are dangerous enough as it is no need to add more danger.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    In Virginia calls should be responded to with "due regard to Life, Limb, and Property in accordance with the Department's in place and approved By-Laws, SOP's, and Virginia State Code Sections 27-11 and 46.2-920. These State Code Sections dictate the use of lights and sirens and does not give a time frame they should be used, in fact the State Police, County Board of Supervisors, and County Attorney has instructed us not to cut them off. I would hate to be the Department's Chief Officer on trial of a response accident who instructed his units to respond in violation of the law. I think we all know what the verdict would be. I want to thank all of you who responded to this forum and for your honesty. I would like to take this time to especially thank the following people who responded:
    dfwscotty--Thanks my defense exactly
    FFCode3EMT--Same here Electronic on Q2B and Horns in congested areas and Intersections only.
    F52 Westside--I agree 100% with the last paragraph.
    Bob Snyder--A+ Same as our area, we have 3 constant crybabies that has now grown to 4 with the last written submittal to my governing body and Chief of Police, and may I add they all live on the Main drag thru the Town.
    Metal Medic--A++ May I assure you that our department does not discriminate against anyone and that we are an Equal Opportunity Siren Blower...

    Correct me if I'm wrong the score is as follows not counting tfd603's or tc1chief's post:
    17 sounds sirens after hours
    1 does not but later agrees with W/Metal

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X