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  • FDNY Auxillary Member

    I have been to a few websites that have listed FDNY Auxillary members. What are they? What do they do? Anybody with information?


    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

  • #2
    Mark -

    Don't quote me on this -- and I am sure I will be hammered for it if I am wrong.... But I do believe that the FDNY Auxillary no longer exists.

    They were just like Auxillary members of the Police Department, they went through an abbreviated training program at Randalls Island, and I belive they were issued yellow helmets, to set them apart from line firefighters....

    Not sure on all the info.... If anyone knows more - please post it here.
    Marc

    "In Omnia Paratus"

    Member - IACOJ
    "Got Crust?"

    -- The opinions presented here are my own; and are not those of any organization that I belong to, or work for.

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    • #3
      dont quote me on thisbut during the second world waraux. FF's were part of the cities civil defense plan.these aux. FF's werent part of the uniform service,just civilian civil defense volunteers.as time went on the FDNY still had aux.FF'S who would hang around at local firehouses and help out.at large fires would would often see them pulling hose,and other non-firefighting duties.to this date i think there are still some around. mike m

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      • #4
        McDonald, you are correct, they wore (wear) yellow helmets. So they preformed classic auxillary functions? Why did they do away with them? Just time for change maybe?

        Thanks!

        *Mark
        FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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        • #5
          http://www.angelfire.com/co2/fdnyeng80lad23/afc.html

          Also, IIRC, Francis Brannigan was a FDNY Auxiliary prior to entering the military in WWII.

          Auxiliaries weren't unusual in WWII. I don't believe Firefighters were exempt from the draft, and they could still volunteer for military service. Considering most cities were still on two-platoon systems, it didn't take the loss of many people to seriously affect staffing. Plus there was on-going concern over what fire-bombings could do in American cities.

          (Indeed, the most effective attack in the States (Hawaii and Alaska were still territories) was the Japanese use of balloon-bombs in an attempt to ignite western forests. The suppression of the many fires they caused was kept hush-hush to avoid a public panic.)

          ---------------
          On the Police side, the Connecticut State Police Auxiliary like many others was formed in WWII to patrol key bridges and facilities to guard against sabotage. However, CSP is phasing out the Auxiliaries on the law-enforcement side, the last class for new Auxies I believe being 1988.
          IACOJ Canine Officer
          20/50

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          • #6
            mark440,

            I was an FDNY Auxiliary from 1968 to 1975, so I'll try and give you some historical perspective.

            The FDNY Fire Auxiliary Corps was founded during World War II as a means to augment the uniformed force in order to provide adequate manpower in the event New York City was attacked.

            After the war, the program was continued. I think it was continued because it provided a worthwhile "community type service" it that auxiliaries were assigned to the firehouse closest to where they lived.

            They were volunteers, who were not assigned to a particular schedule, but could "work" whenever they wanted to.

            In "my time" auxiliaries were required to attend a training course and upon completion were assigned to a company (most frequently to an engine company). They were allowed to perform "outside activities" (i.e. hook up to hydrants, remove kinks from hoselines, assist the MPO and other "outside duties"). Auxiliaries were not supposed to engage in actual interior firefighting or other operations. However, depending on the neighborhood, some auxiliaries actually did "get in the action".

            I was fortunate. I was assigned to Brooklyn's Ladder 132 ("In The Eye Of The Storm")and the officers and men were great. Not only was I expected to perform my "duties" but the guys really made me feel like a member of the company.
            This experience was really my "formative years" in the fire service and have made a lasting impression.

            The Auxiliary program lost members during the mid and late Seventies (particularly during the "lay-off" years) and I for one would feel sorry if the Fire Auxiliary Corps has faded away completely.

            Hope that answers some of your questions regarding the auxiliaries. If you have any more, let me know.

            Regards,

            Jim Boyle (aka 1261Truckie)

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            • #7
              Thanks for your answers.

              *Mark
              FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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