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  • Saw Chains

    What is everyone using as far as saw chains for ventilation?? In particular is anyone using the Bullet Chains from cutters edge?? How do they hold up?? Any lessons learned on different saws, chains (semi chisel or chipper, carbide??)
    thanks for your input.....

  • #2
    Tempest...The makers of Blowers....now have a chainsaw.

    It is on a huscavana motor and called the Ventmaster. It uses a depth guage that is removable so the saw can be used for regular wood cutting. The chain is carbide tip and since the guage is removable...it is smaller and more open so it cleans itself.. no gumming up.
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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    • #3
      Well I have seen the bullet chain in action, and you couldn't pay me enough to use one of them. You have to wear lot's of leg protection, b/c we made about two cut's and I think it was 13 or somewhere around that, the number of edges that came off and hit you, so no I would never use one.

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      • #4
        We've used the Bullet Chains almost exclusively and they've been great. We've never had a problem w/ them. They've cut through everything we've had to cut through. We've never had anything come off of the chains and hit you (except sawdust). I recommend them w/out reserve.

        Stay Safe

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        • #5
          The whole purpose of cutting a vent hole is to get up there and get down as quick as you can. The Bullet Chain won't let you do that, it takes twice as long to cut a hole with them. When they show up on our saws after a pm we have them changed back to carbide. One of the most dangerous places on the fire ground is above the fire, so why stay up there any longer than you have to.

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          • #6
            The Paid on call department I worked for used the bullet chain on both a stihl and a cutters edge, both worked well. The career department I'm on uses regular carbide blades that work well also. The only differance I have experianced is the ability to cut through shingles and nails...the carbide is good for about 1 hole or a couple of nails, the bullet chain seems to take more and cut longer. Just a thought, Stay Safe...Mark
            My posts reflect my views and opinions, not the organization I work for or my IAFF local. Some of which they may not agree. I.A.C.O.J. member
            "I ask, Sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them."
            George Mason
            Co-author of the Second Amendment
            during Virginia's Convention to Ratify the Constitution, 1788
            Elevator Rescue Information

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            • #7
              Above all, it is the operator of the saw which determines which is best. You can't tell me that when cutting a 4' by 4' hole that one chain will cut the whole 5 minutes faster than another chain. Maybe 5-10 seconds. We've had great success w/ the Bullet Chains. They cut through roofs extremely fast w/ no bind up. They've cut multiple holes on slate roofs with no problem.

              Have we timed it compared to a regular carbide tip? No. Would one be faster than another? Who knows? I'm guessing that you could cut 4 holes, two with each type of blade, and you would get 4 similar times, neither one being significantly different from the other. One time twice as long as the other? No. It's the operator that makes the difference.

              Stay Safe

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              • #8
                You guys having trouble with bullets,who's sharpening them?We had both super chisel Carbide and bullet (cutters edge).I got hit with more pieces of chisel than I ever did with the bullet.Slow cutting thru a roof?Not unless it's concrete or steel.Either chain in operating condition will do a good job on standard roofing,however the bullet WILL take more abuse and still function.When they need sharpening sent them back to CE otherwise you WILL have a poor cutting chain(Spoken from experience)We have spares and rotate them out for service.In five years We've never lost a bit from our bullets.T.C.

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                • #9
                  We had a brand new demo with that bullet chain on it so it was a new chain and all.

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                  • #10
                    Dfd,This failure interests me.Please post or E-mail me with particulars.We have quite a few CE saws in our area and no-one I've spoken to has had or at least will admit to any such failures.As I said I've got quite a lot of time with these saws and never experienced a failure of the type you describe.T.C.

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                    • #11
                      We've run cutters edge on our quint and engine for at least 5 years without a single problem! Take it for what thats worth.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for the opinions. Just a little update. We used to have carbide but had a problem with the tips falling off. Our wildland chains are Semi Chisel Semi Skips and work well for our area(ponderosa/Chaparel). They last about 40" on commercial roofs. We tried a chipper chain with carbide peices on the cutter and got about the same results. The operator definately has an effect on chain life (greatly decreased by any twisting) K 12 with a carbide blade will cut indefinately with minimal damage to the blade. (I prefer the chain saw however as I like to feel the rafters) I have e-mailed cutters edge and am awaiting info, and so the reasearch continues.

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                        • #13
                          My department put Ventmasters on all the quints in the city, replacing the Stihl 044. Every time we use the Ventmaster we have to take it out of service and send it to the garage for repair. Most recently we used on a commercial structure with a tar roof. It was gummed up beyond belief and eventually quit running.

                          The garage loaned us a Stihl 044 which we used to vent two roofs at working house fires on Christmas
                          night. It worked flawlessly and still continues to work. In my book you can not beat a good Stihl.

                          Now as far as blades are concerned. If you can afford a carbide tiped blade go for it. They work well on roofs. otherwise, keep your normal blade sharp and practice cutting with the saw and you can get the job done.

                          Nothing beats a Stihl and some practice.

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                          • #14
                            We use a Stihl 044 with carbide teeth. Its not a division wide policy, but on our crew, if we cut the roof, we junk the chain. Don't even bother to count the teeth. We keep plenty of spares, so there's no point in not having a fresh chain at all times. Like CLWFWFD said, why be up there longer than you need to?
                            See You At The Big One

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