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The Worst Call you have ever been on?

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  • #16
    Lots of calls stick in my mind when paged to various types of incident. I have two calls that still cause me problems.

    1. Simple highway fender bender car A rear ends car b doing about 35 MPH and launches baby in backseat carseat through the windshield... seems the baby was not liking the seatbelt so Mom unbuckled it

    2. T-bone wreck 20 ton Dumptruck verse small 2 door Cavalier... when we rolled up on the left side of the wreck we where not sure what we had but after we walked to the front we realized the car's passenger compartment was twisted in a half roll under the truck and the engine compartment was sticking out the left side... this truck had a long bumper just like most of our trucks do with a circle blood splatter where the nine year old front passengers head impacted... three dead

    I can guarantee your pumper, ladder, tanker, or whatever can easily be the truck involved in the above incident... Drive like your families life depends on it because it does...

    Still feel like crap when I talk about these calls and every time I see a dump truck I move out of the way...

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    • #17
      Was about 2AM when we were toned for an MVA just outside of town. As a vol/POC, I was paired with a career paramedic and covering for another career member during a patient transfer, so we had two in the house.

      We took the ambulance out and arrived within a couple of minutes. A small pickup had failed to negotiate a curve on a divided highway, crossed the median and collided nearly head-on with a newer four-door sedan. Airbags in the sedan deployed, 17yof driver also had her seatbelt on. Driver of the pickup, 38yom, drunk as hell, was not belted. He went cleanly through the windshield and was not very close to the wreck any more.

      Upon arrival, the pmedic with me took one look at the car and called for the volunteers coming behind us to step it up. He sent me to the pt on the ground, and headed directly to the car.

      They drunk guy was slightly incoherent, but was still threatening to kill me. I did a quick assessment and found no life-threatening injuries apparent. He was conscious, no broken bones, numerous lacerations and road rash. I left him in custody of an EMT-certified Sheriff's Deputy and went to help with the female driver of the car.

      She was slightly conscious and groaning with pain. Due to the front-left corner impact, the airbag had not done much good, and the car's passenger compartment was crushed sufficient to severely entrap her legs. Worse, the engine was smoking and fuel odor was heavy.

      The rescue and engine arrived in short order, and we got her out before the car could light up. I drove her to the hospital myself, delayed by some punk in a car that didn't want to pull over for an ambulance flashing red and blue on his rear bumper.

      Despite the airbag and seatbelt, she was badly injured. Multiple compound arm and leg fractures and head trauma.

      She coded in the back of the rig before we got to the hospital six miles away. We worked with ER staff for forty minutes to get her back. Even though she was trying to talk to us right after the accident, within 60 minutes she was gone due to the severe head injuries sustained.

      The drunk guy turned out to be as I assessed. No seatbelt or airbag, ejected clean through the windshield, and extent of injuries was cuts and bruises. He walked out of the hospital (to a squad car) less than two hours later.

      Why is it that a girl doing everything right dies, and a guy doing everything wrong lives?

      That one still bothers me.

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      • #18
        I'VE BEEN ON MANY BAD CAR ACCIDENTS. WEATHER IT IS FATAL OR SERIOUS. THE WORST ACCIDENT I'VE SEEN IS A MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT. THE GUY DRIVING THE MOTORCYCLE JUST TRADED HIS $30,000.00 CAR FOR THIS CROCH ROCKET. HE WAS GOING OVER 100MPH WHEN HE CAME OVER A SLIGHT INCLINE THAT HAD A DEAD END. THE MOTORCYCLE WENT AIRBORN. HE STRUCK A TREE ABOUT 10 FT OFF THE GROUND RIPPING HIS LEG OFF AND LEAVING HIS INTESTINES ALL OVER THE TREE AND TALL BUSHES. WHEN WE FINALLY FOUND HIS BODY ABOUT 75-100 YARDS INTO THE WOODS, HE WAS MISSING HIS EYE AND YOU COULD BARELY MAKE OUT HIS FACE. LIKE I SAID I'VE SEEN A LOT OF ACCIDENTS BUT THIS ONE WAS THE MOST GRUSOM. IT JUST SO HAPPENED WE WERE ON OUR WAY BACK FROM A FIRE SAFETY CLASS AND CAME UPON IT ABOUT 1-2MIN AFTER IT HAD HAPPENED. THERE WASNT MUCH WE COULD DO FOR THE GUY OF COURSE. FOR ALL YOU FIREFIGHTERS AND CIVILIANS, YOU NEED TO WATCH YOUR SPEEDS WHEN DRIVING A MOTORCYCLE YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU MAY ENCOUNTER. BE SAFE AND HAVE A HAPPY HOLIDAY.

        FIREFLY2420
        FIREFIGHTER/MFR
        LYON TOWNSHIP, MI

        REMEMBER WE ARE ALL BROTHERS CARREER/PAID-ON-CALL/VOLUNTEER. WE ALL DO THIS JOB FOR THE SAME REASON "LIFE AND PROPERTY".

        [This message has been edited by FIREFLY2420 (edited 12-04-2000).]

        Comment


        • #19
          Here are two that a buddy of mine told me:

          1) Middle of the night, some guy in a Corvette decides to do doughnuts in the empty parking lot across from the Sheriffs station. When a squad car pulls into the lot to find out what is going on, the guy takes off. Police give chace for a mile or two. The guy was clocked at 130 and the police broke off the chase. The police round a corner and find the car had hit a tree. The car is split in two, only being held together by a wiring harness. When the FD arrives, they notice a childseat in the car. Immediately, a search of the forest begins. One of the FF is searching with a flashlight and steps on something squishy and slips. He was terrified and refused to look down thinking he had stepped on the baby. When other FF were called over, they discovered it was a plastic grabage bag filled with grass clippings. The man died and thankfully the baby was at his girfriends house.

          2) Single vehicle accident, car runs off road and hits a tree. PD arrives and sees a woman rumaging around in the trunk and then shuts it as soon as the PD get close. When they arrive they the woman is injured badly and very drunk. Officer find two small kids in the back seat, although the woman had mentioned nothing about them. In the trunk they found numerous beer and liquor bottles that the woman was trying to hide. Rather than tend to her children, she has the audacity to try to hide the evidence before help arrives. Apparently, the doctors at the hospital had little sympathy and gave her nothing for the pain. The children survived their injuries.

          Eric

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          • #20
            We had been dispatched for a reported car fire with exposures. The first unit on scene reported "Car involved, structures heavily involved". When my rig arrived on scene; it was un believable. A mother was screaming for her little boy and firefighters frantically reaching into a fully involved car trying to pull the little one out. I can hear him screaming as I ran to help, when I got there he had fallen into the floor pan and stopped screaming. Later after the rest of the fires were extinguised, I was to help remove him from the bottom of the car. My own litle girl, at the time, was around his age. I was devastated,I had been on numerous calls involving kids before but this was different. I still go back to that day often especially when I hear kids scream. Its makes my the hair on the back of my neck stand up.

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            • #21
              The worst call I can remember was one in which I was not directly involved in. But it still blows my mind:
              My grandfather is 70+ years old, but he is as active as a man half his age. Anwyay, he works PT for a HVAC company in Va. He was traveling down this road which is notorious for accidents. ( One lane either direction.) He knows that there is a car behind him, and it contains a mother, and a kid. ( He had passed them, and they pulled in behind him.) Up the road, he sees a large truck swerving on the road. And this is what blows my mind: He knew that if he moved out of the way, the truck would hit the car behind him. And so, instead of moving to avoid an accident, he places the '83 F-350 he was driving on the soft shoulder, right where the big truck is heading. Collision occurs, and this truck rolls on top of the pickup.
              My grandfather survived this accident, and though he now has a rod in his leg, he still is active as hell. I would like to send a thank you out to the Ford motor company for building a solid truck. The fact it was an an older model saved his life. God Bless sheet metal.

              ------------------
              "I hate it when someone says something is impossible, because then I have to go and find a way to do it."
              Stay safe, boys and girls. It's for keeps out there.

              [This message has been edited by smokeater-n-hellraiser (edited 12-10-2000).]

              Comment


              • #22
                My worst call was on 19 March this year. I was going to college at Bloomsburg University in PA. I was volunteering up there. It was Sunday morning a little before 6 am. The page went off for a fully involved structure fire at the TKE house. A local fraturnity. When I left my apartment I knew it was going to be a long day. From my parking space on the top of the mountian that is Bloomsburg University I could see a thick black colum of smoke. On my way to the station, I could see the building, flames reaching 50 feet off the roof, and half way into the street. I heard police reports over the radio, people were still jumping out second story windows. There by the time we rolled on sceen with engine 22 it was rumored that there were still people inside.

                By the end of the day we unburried three TKE brothers. It was sad for me cause these were the same people that I want to classes with. On the good side, Engine 33 made a great trench on the roof of a 8 dwelling row home that was only five feet away from the TKE building. One ladie suffered major damage to her row home, the closest to the fire, but made it out, and she ended up rebuilding, and her neighbor's homes were saved.

                I do have to say, It was really great how the community and the college came together that night and the following days. The university held news confrences and offered counciling. The students then held a candle light service infront of the remains of the TKE house the following evening. The Surviving TKE brothers madew a plywood sign with TKE on it. The brothers placed their red bandanas, symbol of their pledge rights, on a pole next to the sign. Girlfriends and sororities placed flowers infront and friends left momentos in front of the sign. I was there as a firefighter, helping the firepolice secure the scene for PSP fire investigators. But shortly there into the service I found some of my friends and we helped console eachother. I really think watching the students honor the three frat brothers helped all the firefighters and fire police that were their that night in small town PA. It was sure better than any kind of critical incident debreif.

                Well thats all.. thanks.

                ------------------
                *************************
                * God Looked down and
                * saw this was bad, it
                * was bad, it was Drew
                *************************

                Comment


                • #23
                  My dept's area is outside Fairchild AFB WA. A few years back on a Monday a psyco goes into the Base Hospital With an AK-47 W/ several hundred rounds of ammunition and starts his own war. Families blown apart, children w limbs and genetalia shot off. Several hundred rounds were fired in the hosp. Picture bodies shot up all thru a family care hosp. Its the survivors that bother me the most. Then to top the week off, Friday a B-52 crashes next to the Survival school on base. Passengers and Crew did not make it. My Crew Made the Initial rescue attempt. Thank God for critical incident stress debriefings.


                  [This message has been edited by fireman703 (edited 12-10-2000).]

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                  • #24
                    Two calls stick in my mind earlier this year at 0730 on a Sunday morning we had a single vehicle MVA car collided with a guard on a bridge doing 85 in a 35 zone flipped over into the water and was pinned in. While enroute to the call we received reports of screams being heard from the vehicle after arriving on scene the vehicle was almost fully submerged. We began an extrication but were not on time he died of drowning. I remember when he came out of the water he was as pale as a sheet of paper. 19yrs old..what a shame
                    The second Incident happened just 2 weeks ago another MVA vehicle overturned passenger ejected thrown approx 45 feet from vehicle into ditch died on impact. what made it so rough was he was a former member of our dept.

                    ------------------
                    Leon Bass
                    SWVFD Station 16

                    ------------------------
                    Disclaimer:
                    These are my opinions and do not reflect the views of my department.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Although not directly involved in the incident last night a neighboring department had a MV-22 OSPREY crash killing all four marines aboard and injuring 2 bystanders

                      ------------------
                      Leon Bass
                      SWVFD Station 16

                      ------------------------
                      Disclaimer:
                      These are my opinions and do not reflect the views of my department.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I believe it was 1994, my volunteer fire department got a call for a girl having trouble breathing at 53????? #^&!*@ Avenue.

                        We went down the street to the 500 block of that street to see our 1st leutenant's wife screaming from the front porch. I jumped from the back of the rescue truck as it went past the house.

                        As I entered, there she laid, a 15 year old girl not breathing. Her boyfriend was trying to give her CPR. I immediately took over. The other guys ran in the back with paniced looks, from what they were seeing.

                        Her stomach was very distended. She had eaten something she was allergic to. Her epinephrine pen did nothing.

                        We continued CPR untill the ambulance arrived. The driver of the ambulance is the girl's father!

                        We tried so hard. Nothing was working.

                        The crew had gotten a pulse, which she sustained for an hour, and then she died.

                        It was one of the hardest things I had ever done. Being a parent myself, I do not know how they survive with this loss.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Dispatched to a rowhouse fire with reported entrapment at 0628 on Christmas Morning. Arrived at 0634 as the second-in engine (I was OIC) and took position on side 3 of the structure, and was advised of possibly three and up to seven people trapped on the upper floors inside. Heavy fire was present from side 1, first floor, with heavy smoke pushing from the second floor. The rear had heavy fire from all three floors. After making entry into the basement with two 1-3/4" lines, we were pushed back by the first floor beginning to collapse, and the fact that master streams were placed in service into the first and second floors. Laddering efforts in the rear were thwarted by heavy fire from the windows, and crews from the front could only attempt entry on the second floor, only to be pushed back by rapidly deteriorating fire conditions. Six civilians died on that fire... and almost a few of us did too. Two adults, and four kids... on what was supposed to be a clear, bright Christmas morning. I'll never forget every sight, smell, and feeling from that morning. The holidays haven't been the same since.

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                          • #28
                            Worst call ever had to be July of '99 mid-day on a saturday. We got banged out for "MVA on I-80 car into a tree, state police requesting expedite on jaws and 4 rigs, Northstar (the chopper) has already been dispatched" I was on the first rig, we found a new Hyundai head-on into a tree with 4 passengers, all entraped. The front passenger was jammed the worst, he had the dash crushing up on his chest and the door pillar folded in behind the back of the seat holding him to the dash. We extricated the driver and both rear seat passengers and sent them to the trauma center by ground saving the bird for the front passenger whom we were waiting to cut out until the medics had him semi-stabilized. This poor guy was conscious and alert and talking to us for almost 45 minutes while we cut his friends out. When his turn came we rolled the dash and as soon as it came off his chest he coded. There wasn't enough of his chest left to even think of doing compressions on. It was the craziest thing... talking to him one second and the next second he was gone with no chance of coming back. They pronounced him on the scene. That one really stuck with me, to this day I can remember his face just going pale as the dash was pushed off him.

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                            • #29
                              The worst one personally was responding to a mutual aid call on the border of our coverage about a year ago and rolling up on the scene to see one of my sisters best friends car smashed and upside down. I had just left my parents house and could not remember if she was home (she was). One dead on scene, one just got out of her wheelchair, and is still recovering, the other two girls were ok.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                As I read through this thread, my eyes watered and I had to fight back tears, not all together for the victims. I stand in awe of all of you who are dedicated to the Fire and Rescue service. I can't begin to comprehend the amount of compassion and strength that goes with your calling.

                                I know there are times many of you feel unappreciated, and I'm aware there are those who don't truly appreciate you. I hope you remember each and every time you go on a call there is one person that does appreciate your dedication, and my prayers will be with all of you as you continue to fullfill your calling. THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!

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