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Bunker gear on EMS calls

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  • cozmosis
    replied
    If I'm wearing shorts, the bunker pants go on for EMS calls. In the summer, it's a bit warm... but our captain purchased a pair of wildland pants that have been approved in lieu of bunkers for such calls. So, I'm thinking that I might explore that route once the weather starts to warm up again.

    Leave a comment:


  • BKDRAFT
    replied
    At about 1700 hours the shorts are on and most begin to relax. Since we cannot wear shorts out on calls or sweatpants for that matter, bunker pants are put on for every call.

    Leave a comment:


  • BoxAlarm187
    replied
    Originally posted by emt161 View Post
    What I want to know is who even READS seven year-old threads?
    Apparently, at least you and I!

    Leave a comment:


  • emt161
    replied
    What I want to know is who even READS seven year-old threads?

    Leave a comment:


  • firemedickyle
    replied
    Most departments I thought it was a standard operating procedure to wear bunker gear to mva's??????????? Your a fool not to.

    As far as, wearing bunker gear on ems calls, there's many factors that go into it.

    Weather-Actitivity your engaging in when the tones drop-Nature of the EMS call.

    Leave a comment:


  • fire1035
    replied
    Originally posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    And you wash your gear EVERY time before you take it home?
    That's my question. I'm gonna say probably not.

    Leave a comment:


  • BoxAlarm187
    replied
    Originally posted by Ha11igan View Post
    I'm going to respond to the station anyways, it just makes it that much easier and faster if I don't have to put a pair of shoes on, take them off, put bunkers on.

    Instead I can just throw the bunkers on faster than a pair of shoes and I'm out the door.

    What good would it do to have the coat and helmet at home too?
    You don't have a pair of old sneakers you can slip on while headed to the station, and kick them off when you get there? Seems silly that you are going to run into the station where your pants would be anyway, just put them on then.

    I have to concur about keeping your gear together at all times. It's simply good practice and a good habit to keep.

    And you wash your gear EVERY time before you take it home?

    Leave a comment:


  • BLSboy
    replied
    This is what I wear for night calls, MVCs, and fire standbys...
    Attached Files

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  • NorthendTruckin
    replied
    With the exception of MVCs no turnouts on EMS calls, I'll keep them in a compartment, but have you tried moving around the back of a medic with just bunkerpants on, let alone full gear. I do like the protection bunker pants give you when your dealing with alot of blood though. So with MVCs its kind of a trade off, but when grandma's having a heart attack or uncle bill ate shellfish again and now he's swelling up like a balloon, I would forgo turnout gear, even on the engine. Plus who wants a bunch of firefighters tracking God knows what all through their house.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ha11igan
    replied
    Originally posted by fire1035 View Post
    I guess it doesn't matter since I don't respond from home, but why would you bring your bunker pants home?

    1. Why would you want to bring your fire clothing home with God knows what all over it. That is exactly what I would want to expose my family to as well.

    2. The pedals on your POV are undoubtedly closer together and smaller than in a fire truck, thus making it harder and less safe to operate while wearing fire boots.

    I wash the pants before bringing it home.


    The pedals in my POV are the EXACT same as a Ford F550.

    Leave a comment:


  • fire1035
    replied
    I guess it doesn't matter since I don't respond from home, but why would you bring your bunker pants home?

    1. Why would you want to bring your fire clothing home with God knows what all over it. That is exactly what I would want to expose my family to as well.

    2. The pedals on your POV are undoubtedly closer together and smaller than in a fire truck, thus making it harder and less safe to operate while wearing fire boots.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ha11igan
    replied
    Originally posted by PureAdrenalin View Post
    ??? Why..this doesn't make any sense.

    I'm going to respond to the station anyways, it just makes it that much easier and faster if I don't have to put a pair of shoes on, take them off, put bunkers on.

    Instead I can just throw the bunkers on faster than a pair of shoes and I'm out the door.

    What good would it do to have the coat and helmet at home too?

    Leave a comment:


  • firemonkey311
    replied
    Originally posted by Ha11igan View Post
    Sometimes in the winter or other bad weather I'll bring my bunkers home and set them by my bed or the door.

    Coat and Helmet stays at station.
    I think its best to keep your gear all together at all times.

    Leave a comment:


  • PureAdrenalin
    replied
    Originally posted by Ha11igan View Post
    Sometimes in the winter or other bad weather I'll bring my bunkers home and set them by my bed or the door.

    Coat and Helmet stays at station.
    ??? Why..this doesn't make any sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • fyrmnk
    replied
    WOW, 7 year resurrection. Nice!

    Leave a comment:

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