Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Diabetics as Firefighters

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • YZRider831
    replied
    Just Wondering

    Hi, I am sixteen and a type one diabetic. I was just wondering if I can be a firefighter. If I can be a firefighter I was wondering what I need to do to get hired with a department. All I know is that diabetics can't drive fire trucks but I don't know how true that is. I saw someone post something on some other site saying that diabetics can't be firefighters because they might go low during a fire and can't stop and get something to eat. I personally believe that is true but won't happen because stations like the one where I am a fire explore will only go on a fire call once a month or less. I would like to hear from people that are firefighters or knows anybody who is a diabetic (type one) working as a firefighter.

    thank you and stay safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Escottie
    replied
    Originally posted by nameless View Post
    no it is, i just said it to illistrate how silly your post was.
    I respect your opinion so don't think that I am trying to be a pain in the ***

    Leave a comment:


  • Stopdropnroll
    replied
    Essential Job Tasks

    Here are the essential job tasks mentioned in the openers

    Chapter 5 Essential Job Tasks
    5.1 Essential Job Tasks and Descriptions.
    5.1.1 The fire department shall evaluate the following 13 essential
    job tasks against the types and levels of emergency services
    provided to the local community by the fire department, the
    types of structures and occupancies comprising the community,
    and the configuration of the fire department to determine the
    essential job tasks of fire department members and candidates:
    (1)*Performing fire-fighting tasks (e.g., hoseline operations,
    extensive crawling, lifting and carrying heavy objects, ventilating
    roofs or walls using power or hand tools, forcible
    entry), rescue operations, and other emergency response
    actions under stressful conditions while wearing personal
    protective ensembles and self-contained breathing apparatus
    (SCBA), including working in extremely hot or cold
    environments for prolonged time periods
    (2) Wearing an SCBA, which includes a demand valve–
    type positive-pressure facepiece or HEPA filter masks,
    which requires the ability to tolerate increased respiratory
    workloads
    (3) Exposure to toxic fumes, irritants, particulates, biological
    (infectious) and nonbiological hazards, and/or
    heated gases, despite the use of personal protective
    ensembles and SCBA
    (4) Depending on the local jurisdiction, climbing six or
    more flights of stairs while wearing fire protective ensemble
    weighing at least 50 lb (22.6 kg) or more and
    carrying equipment/tools weighing an additional 20
    to 40 lb (9 to 18 kg)
    (5) Wearing fire protective ensemble that is encapsulating and
    insulated, which will result in significant fluid loss that frequently
    progresses to clinical dehydration and can elevate
    core temperature to levels exceeding 102.2°F (39°C)
    (6) Searching, finding, and rescue-dragging or carrying victims
    ranging from newborns up to adults weighing over
    200 lb (90 kg) to safety despite hazardous conditions and
    low visibility
    (7) Advancing water-filled hoselines up to 21⁄2 in. (65 mm)
    in diameter from fire apparatus to occupancy [approximately
    150 ft (50 m)], which can involve negotiating
    multiple flights of stairs, ladders, and other obstacles
    1582–8 COMPREHENSIVE OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL PROGRAM FOR FIRE DEPARTMENTS
    2007 Edition
    (8) Climbing ladders, operating from heights, walking or
    crawling in the dark along narrow and uneven surfaces,
    and operating in proximity to electrical power lines and/or
    other hazards
    (9) Unpredictable emergency requirements for prolonged
    periods of extreme physical exertion without benefit of
    warm-up, scheduled rest periods, meals, access to medication(
    s), or hydration
    (10) Operating fire apparatus or other vehicles in an emergency
    mode with emergency lights and sirens
    (11) Critical, time-sensitive, complex problem solving during
    physical exertion in stressful, hazardous environments,
    including hot, dark, tightly enclosed spaces, that is further
    aggravated by fatigue, flashing lights, sirens, and
    other distractions
    (12) Ability to communicate (give and comprehend verbal orders)
    while wearing personal protective ensembles and
    SCBA under conditions of high background noise, poor
    visibility, and drenching from hoselines and/or fixed protection
    systems (sprinklers)
    (13) Functioning as an integral component of a team, where
    sudden incapacitation of a member can result in mission
    failure or in risk of injury or death to civilians or other
    team members

    Leave a comment:


  • Stopdropnroll
    replied
    9.6.5 Diabetes Mellitus That Does Not Require Insulin Therapy.

    9.6.5.1 Physician Evaluation. Diabetes mellitus that does not
    require insulin therapy and that is controlled by diet, exercise,
    and/or oral hypoglycemic agents compromises the member’s
    ability to safely perform essential job tasks 5, 9, and 13, and the
    physician shall report the applicable job limitations to the
    fire department, unless the member meets all of the following
    criteria:

    (1) Has achieved a stable blood glucose as evidenced by Hemoglobin
    A1C level less than 8 during the prior 3-month
    period.

    (2) If on oral hypoglycemic agents, has had no episodes of severe
    hypoglycemia (defined as requiring assistance of another
    in the preceding year).

    (3) Has a dilated retinal exam by a qualified ophthalmologist or
    optometrist that shows no higher grade of diabetic retinopathy
    than microaneurysms, as indicated on the International
    Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Disease Severity Scale.

    (4) Has normal renal function based on a calculated creatinine
    clearance greater than 60 mL/min and absence of
    proteinuria. (Creatinine clearance can be calculated by
    use of the Cockroft-Gault or similar formula. Proteinuria is
    defined as 24-hour urine excretion of greater than or equal
    to 300 mg protein or greater than or equal to 300 mg of
    albumin per gram of creatinine in a random sample.)

    (5) Has no autonomic or peripheral neuropathy. (Peripheral
    neuropathy is determined by diminished ability to feel
    the vibration of a 128 cps tuning fork or the light touch of
    a 10-gram monofilament on the dorsum of the great toe
    proximal to the nail. Autonomic neuropathy can be determined
    by evidence of gastroparesis, postural hypotension,
    or abnormal tests of heart rate variability.)

    (6) Has normal cardiac function without evidence of myocardial
    ischemia on cardiac stress testing (to at least 12 METS)
    by ECG and cardiac imaging.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stopdropnroll
    replied
    9.6.4 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus That Requires Treatment with
    Insulin.


    9.6.4.1* Physician Evaluation. Type 2 diabetes mellitus that requires
    treatment with insulin compromises the member’s ability
    to safely perform essential job tasks 5, 9, and 13, and the physician
    shall report the applicable job limitations to the fire department,
    unless the member meets all of the following criteria:

    (1) Is maintained by a physician knowledgeable in current management
    of diabetes mellitus.

    (2) Has demonstrated over a period of at least 3 months the
    motivation and understanding required to closely monitor
    and control capillary blood glucose levels through nutritional
    therapy and insulin administration. Assessment of this
    shall take into consideration the member’s experience and prior
    history dealing with the erratic meal schedules, sleep disruption,
    and high aerobic and anaerobic workloads intrinsic to
    fire fighting.

    (3) Has a dilated retinal exam by a qualified ophthalmologist or
    optometrist that shows no higher grade of diabetic retinopathy
    than microaneurysms, as indicated on the International
    Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Disease Severity Scale.

    (4) Has normal renal function based on a calculated creatinine
    clearance greater than 60 mL/min and absence of
    proteinuria. (Creatinine clearance can be calculated by
    use of the Cockroft-Gault or similar formula. Proteinuria
    is defined as 24-hour urine excretion of greater than or
    equal to 300 mg protein or greater than or equal to 300 mg
    of albumin per gram of creatinine in a random sample.)

    (5) Has no autonomic or peripheral neuropathy. (Peripheral
    neuropathy is determined by diminished ability to feel
    the vibration of a 128 cps tuning fork or the light touch of
    a 10-gram monofilament on the dorsum of the great toe
    proximal to the nail. Autonomic neuropathy can be determined
    by evidence of gastroparesis, postural hypotension,
    or abnormal tests of heart rate variability.)

    (6) Has normal cardiac function without evidence of myocardial
    ischemia on cardiac stress testing (to at least 12 METS)
    by ECG and cardiac imaging.

    (7) Has a signed statement from an endocrinologist knowledgeable
    in management of diabetes mellitus as well as
    the essential job tasks and hazards of fire fighting as described
    in Section 9.1 that the member meets the following
    criteria:

    (a) Is maintained on a stable insulin regimen and has demonstrated
    over a period of at least 3 months the motivation
    and understanding required to closely monitor
    and control capillary blood glucose levels despite varied
    activity schedules through nutritional therapy and insulin
    administration

    (b) Has achieved stable control of blood glucose as evidenced
    by Hemoglobin A1C less than 8 when monitored
    at least twice yearly, which must include evidence
    of a set schedule for blood glucose monitoring
    and a thorough review of data from such monitoring

    (c) Does not have an increased risk of hypoglycemia due
    to alcohol use or other predisposing factors

    (d) Has had no episodes of severe hypoglycemia (defined
    as requiring assistance of another) in the preceding 1
    year, with no more than one episode of severe hypoglycemia
    in the preceding 5 years

    (e) Is certified not to have a medical contraindication to
    fire-fighting training and operations

    9.6.4.2 Physician Guidance. When evaluating a member with
    Type 2 diabetes mellitus, the physician shall recognize that
    episodes of severe hypoglycemia are considered the best predictors
    of an increased risk of subsequent episodes and hypoglycemia
    interferes with cognitive function and judgment

    Leave a comment:


  • Stopdropnroll
    replied
    Nfpa 1582 actual text, circa 2007

    If anyone would like a PDF of the entire NFPA 1582, drop me an e-mail at [email protected]. ~SDnR~

    [Start cut/paste]

    9.6.2 If the member has any endocrine and metabolic disorders,
    the member shall be individually evaluated in accordance
    with 9.6.3 through 9.6.7 to determine if the disorders
    compromise the member’s ability to safely perform the essential
    job tasks.

    9.6.3 Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus That Requires Treatment with
    Insulin.


    9.6.3.1* Physician Evaluation. Type 1 diabetes mellitus that requires
    treatment with insulin compromises the member’s ability
    to safely perform essential job tasks 5, 9, and 13, and the physician
    shall report the applicable job limitations to the fire department,
    unless the member meets all of the following criteria:

    (1) Is maintained by a physician knowledgeable in current
    management of diabetes mellitus on a basal/bolus (can
    include subcutaneous insulin infusion pump) regimen using
    insulin analogs.

    (2) Has demonstrated over a period of at least 1 year the motivation
    and understanding required to closely monitor and
    control capillary blood glucose levels through nutritional
    therapy and insulin administration. Assessment of this shall
    take into consideration the member’s experience and history dealing
    with erratic meal schedules, sleep disruption, and high
    aerobic and anaerobic workloads intrinsic to fire fighting.

    (3) Has a dilated retinal exam by a qualified ophthalmologist or
    optometrist that shows no higher grade of diabetic retinopathy
    than microaneurysms, as indicated on the International
    Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Disease Severity Scale.

    (4) Has normal renal function based on a calculated creatinine
    clearance greater than 60 mL/min and absence of
    proteinuria. (Creatinine clearance can be calculated by
    use of the Cockroft-Gault or similar formula. Proteinuria is
    defined as 24-hour urine excretion of greater than or equal
    to 300 mg protein or greater than or equal to 300 mg of
    albumin per gram of creatinine in a random sample.)

    (5) Has no autonomic or peripheral neuropathy. (Peripheral
    neuropathy is determined by diminished ability to feel
    the vibration of a 128 cps tuning fork or the light touch of
    a 10-gram monofilament on the dorsum of the great toe
    proximal to the nail. Autonomic neuropathy can be determined
    by evidence of gastroparesis, postural hypotension,
    or abnormal tests of heart rate variability.)

    (6) Has normal cardiac function without evidence of myocardial
    ischemia on cardiac stress testing (to at least 12 METS)
    by ECG and cardiac imaging.

    (7) Has a signed statement from an endocrinologist knowledgeable
    in management of diabetes mellitus as well as
    the essential job tasks and hazards of fire fighting as described
    in Section 9.1 that the member meets the following
    criteria:

    (a) Is maintained on a stable basal/bolus regimen using insulin
    analogs and has demonstrated over a period of at
    least 1 year the motivation and understanding required
    to closely monitor and control capillary blood glucose
    levels despite varied activity schedules through nutritional
    therapy and insulin administration

    (b) Has achieved stable control of blood glucose as evidenced
    by Hemoglobin A1C consistently less than 8
    when monitored at least twice yearly

    (c) Does not have an increased risk of hypoglycemia due
    to alcohol use or other predisposing factors

    (d) Has had no episodes of severe hypoglycemia (defined as
    requiring assistance of another) in the preceding 1 year,
    with no more than one episode of severe hypoglycemia
    in the preceding 5 years

    (e) Is certified not to have a medical contraindication to
    fire-fighting training and operations

    9.6.3.2 Physician Guidance. When evaluating a member with
    Type 1 diabetes mellitus, the physician shall recognize that
    episodes of severe hypoglycemia are associated with an increased
    risk of subsequent episodes and that hypoglycemia
    can interfere with cognitive function and judgment. Presence
    of microvascular and neurological complications of diabetes
    might increase the risk of hypoglycemic events.
    Last edited by Stopdropnroll; 08-08-2008, 08:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    Originally posted by Escottie View Post
    and what your saying is not?
    no it is, i just said it to illistrate how silly your post was.

    Leave a comment:


  • catscratch
    replied
    At an old department I worked with a diabetic. Unfortunately, after this experience I would be wary to work with one again because of the bad experience's I had with this individual. Basically, he was relatively young, and because he had taken such poor care of his body he had been diagnosed as a Type 2 diabetic by the time he was 29. Now, many people live with this and can control it very well if they take positive steps toward working on the diet, etc. This individual did not take that route however, and on two occasions over 8 months of my time working there he had to be taken to the ER twice while on duty because of issues with his blood sugar. He just refused to take care of his body, eg no exercise, fast food all the time, you get the picture.

    I believe that many people who are disciplined could easily work as a diabetic, but unfortunately this guy just didn't get it. I think this was a "worst case scenario" type of thing. Don't know if he is still working or not, this was a couple of years ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Escottie
    replied
    Originally posted by nameless View Post
    thats a big assumption the overweight firefighter could "pop" at anytime. A type 1 could drop at anytime.
    and what your saying is not?

    Leave a comment:


  • GaPeach933
    replied
    Sorry

    Namless, I guess I should take that out of my posting. I have no idea why I said that...

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    Originally posted by GaPeach933 View Post
    I'm an attractive female, 36 years old, who could lose a few pounds, but I am out of shape.


    not really sure why that matters, looks like trouble though

    Leave a comment:


  • GaPeach933
    replied
    Diabetics as Firefighters

    Originally posted by Canadian Firemedic View Post
    Yes. I have worked with an insulin dependant diabetic for 3 years and never seen him run into a problem. His team members are aware and he is vigilant in monitoring his own condition. He's one heck of a firefighter.

    Kudos! I'm so proud of the guys that can control and keep their diabetes in check and do a great job at work. I have read all the posts and yes, there are going to be some pros, cons, and arguments from both sides. I think for many people, some kind of medical condition or disability won't keep them from being able to do well at their occupation, and possibly just make them strive do the best they can, over and beyond.

    I'd like to share a little bit about me. I don't have DM, type I or II. My dad is type 2. But it's because he's overweight and doesn't do much about it. I am pretty serious about becoming a volunteer firefighter, starting next summer, in 2009. I am 36 years old, but I am somewhat out of shape. So, I'm really motivated to get into shape because I know how much physical work is involved being a firefighter and I want to be able to do my best, physically and mentally. On the other hand, and I'm sure every department has their own policies, that I may need to cut my long hair. But if policies dictate that, then I will.

    Love,

    Suzanne
    Last edited by GaPeach933; 08-07-2008, 01:46 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    Originally posted by Escottie View Post
    Id rather a Type 1 that takes care of himself then an overweight firefighter that could pop at anytime. And lets face it, that is the majority of US firefighters
    thats a big assumption the overweight firefighter could "pop" at anytime. A type 1 could drop at anytime.

    Leave a comment:


  • doughesson
    replied
    Originally posted by Escottie View Post
    Id rather a Type 1 that takes care of himself then an overweight firefighter that could pop at anytime. And lets face it, that is the majority of US firefighters
    I was on a vollie department but I knew enough paid guys to know that this job would give anyone diabetes.Times you can't finish your meal,the times you have to work through meals and don't get a chance for more than what's in the fridge from last night,etc,etc etc.
    My Chief was diabetic(don't know and never asked which type) and he was a stickler for food on scene when we worked long calls.It wasn't just for him.
    If you know someone is diabetic,learn from him what he wants when he needs help or let the guys that have known him longer handle the situation.You can make a better friend than by presuming to know exactly why he's having trouble before he's told you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Escottie
    replied
    Originally posted by oldE6man View Post
    I hate to be the one to pee in the Cheerios, but I have a problem with insulin-dependent diabetics performing suppression activities. One of the previous postings made the case by stating that his first working fire caused him problems. If the situation had gone sour (as all veteran firefighters have experienced), and his partner had become entrapped by a falling wall, etc, this firefighter may have been unable to effect a positive outcome.

    I know that many diabetics regulate their insulin and glucose levels well, but the chance of extreme exertion is always lurking in the background in our profession. If a diabetic is unable to control his environment (and he certainly cannot control it in a hostile fire situation), I think he could be a liability.
    Id rather a Type 1 that takes care of himself then an overweight firefighter that could pop at anytime. And lets face it, that is the majority of US firefighters

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X