Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Remembering why I became a firefighter.

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Remembering why I became a firefighter.

    I was off duty today, but was sent on a call that reminded me of why I became a firefighter.
    About 6pm this evening the station called and asked if I could go over to an elderly ladies home and light her furnace for her.
    (The lads at the station would have gladly done it, but it is a "liability" for the on duty crew to light a furnace. It's a Chief thing)
    I called her up and told her who I was, and asked when would be a good time to come over. She told me now was fine.

    She only lives about 10 blocks away from my house so it didn't take long to arrive.
    I met her at the door and she showed me where the furnace was. We spoke awhile then I proceeded to read the directions and light the pilot light. As I was working she talked to me some more.
    She had tears in her eyes as she told me how sad she was that I had lost so many brothers in New York. She said she had just watched it and cried and cried. Needless to say I was feeling a little weepy myself after she thanked me for taking the time to help her out. She said her son hadn't spoken or visited with her in 3 years and that he only lives 15 miles away.
    I finished lighting the furnace and then stood in her living room and talked with her awhile. She told me how lonely it gets being home all alone all the time, and I realized how fortunate I am to have the strength and health to work out, play, spend time with friends and family, and be a firefighter. She wanted to give me a picture that she had sitting on the couch. It was an American Flag with a Prayer For the Nation on it. She wanted to know if we could hang it in the station. I told her I would take it and put it up for her.
    She thanked me for taking the time to come by and take care of her.
    What a small deed it was, only about 15-20 minutes I spent there, yet this was something monumental in this womans life.
    She gave me a hug as I was leaving, and told me to tell my wife how fortunate she was to have someone special to be with her.
    As I left, I couldn't help thinking about all those times I have been upset at making the little call, or having to put up with someone's petty problem, and all this time there was one person who just needed a friend for a few moments.

    This is what being a firefighter is all about. It isn't the glory of a blazing inferno! No. It is the impact we can have on the lives of others every day, even when we aren't at the station. Thank you Mrs. Johns for reminding how much I love the job I have.


    be safe brothers
    Be safe brothers

  • #2
    Thanks Mrs. Johns, and thank you, Scott, for simply yet eloquently describing what it is that makes us do what we do.

    Take care, stay safe, and keep doing the "little things" that make the job so worthwile.
    "Let's roll." - Todd Beamer, one of a group of American soldiers who handed the terrorists their first defeat.

    Joe Black

    The opinions expressed are mine and mine alone (but you can borrow them )and may not reflect those of any organization with which I am associated (but then again, they just may not be thinking clearly).

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey Scott, there's water in my eyes. Way to go friend...being their for Mrs. Johns. We often hear how this country is going to hell in a hand basket. But we didn't hear that from the Lord Himself...He told us "to love our neighbor has ourselves", and what you did is exactly what He was talking about. You are a blessing!!!
      The part about the son not coming around for years reminded me of a similiar situation. It was Christmas Day in the late 90's and we rolled to a nasty structure fire. We made entry without a handline because the neighbors weren't sure anybody was home. The elderly lady, Thank God, wasn't home but her 9 cats all perished. She was a security guard at some industry up town and was on duty. When she came on the scene, I went to comfort her and ask her about contacting family. She told me she had a son in Zanesville she hadn't seen in years. Nor had he even attempted to call. We got in touch with him and before we left the scene, he arrived. The last thing I saw was him and his Mom hugging, for quite awhile! I thanked God for using a disaster and turning it to good. He does that alot!
      Thank you Scott, a rainy day just got sunshine! E-mail me sometime, just to chew fat.
      See you on the big one!<br />Billy Reiter 1st Lieutenant/Chaplain available 24 7

      Comment


      • #4
        I thank you for such a great story. I think that everyone who reads it will be touched and maybe next time they go on a call that may seem little or petty, they will remember why we do our jobs. It's for the people that we protect.

        Comment


        • #5
          Your story brought tears to my eyes, but, I'm thankful for it. You truely remind me why I do this job and whats really important.

          Bless you and Mrs. Johns.
          Bless all of our Fallen Brothers and Sisters. You will not be forgotten

          Comment


          • #6
            YOU HAVE JUST KNOCKED US ALL UP A NOTCH IN THE PUBLICS EYES. SHE WILL NO DOUBT TELL ALL OF HER FRIENDS WHAT YOU DID. GREAT JOB AND PATS ON THE BACK.
            YES I AM A PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTER AND YES I AM IN THE UNION

            Comment


            • #7
              Scott: big difference between you and that Muslim bum up in Albany, who would probably take down that photo if he was in your station.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Scott from another brother in Louisiana. I have been in similar situations and want to tell you that peolple like you make me proud to be a firefighter. As I read items in the forum I notice how we really are like a family as we seem to all have the same emotions. Puts new meaning to the old phrase " Birds Of a Feather flock together".
                Keep up the good work brother.

                Stay safe!

                Comment


                • #9
                  good job scott. Not only you made yourself feel good plus it was good Public Relations for the f.d. and her. It's always good if you have time to just stop by at somebody that just moved in and say hey look i'm on such and such f.d. if you have a emergency call 9-1-1 and if you'd like to take a tour of the fire dept call me and i'll show you around(it takes a whole 5 mins ). but just that security factor really helps them bond with the f.d. i think.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yesterday we ran a call that made me remember why I became a firefighter. Over the radio I heard dispatch call my chief asking if the fire department could a assist a woman whose horse went down. He said we could help. Dispatch toned us out and we had twelve guys respond. The horse was sick and too weak to stand. The woman needed help loading it on a trailer so she could take it to the vet. It took us over and hour and several attempts because the horse kept kicking, but we got it loaded up without anybody, including the horse, getting hurt. The woman said she spent over eight hours trying to find help and nobody would do it. She calls the fire department and has twelve people to help within minutes.
                    The horse might not make it but I feel good knowing that we helped when nobody else would. That's what being a firefighter is all about.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the posts.
                      I am glad to see the spirit of the fire service still living strong in america!


                      be safe brothers
                      Be safe brothers

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Retrotex,

                        That was so nice. So many people just don't care to help injured animals. It always makes me smile when I see a picture in the newspaper of a big macho fireman giving mouth to mouth to a cat! When you help an animal, you're not just helping them but their owners as well. Thank you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Scott, after the 9-11 tragedy,it's even stronger than ever. Too bad it takes such a horrific event to show us and the comminity that we really are a big family and we will serve them no matter what the call is, from a cat stuck in the tree, to the "ultimate" call.
                          God bless everyone and stay safe.
                          HELL YEAH!!!
                          The comments made by me are just that. Not of the Fire dept or Ambulance squad I am on.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Amen, brother. It's those small acts of kindness that make it all worthwhile.
                            "It's not surprising, but it's a shame"


                            "Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts"
                            -A. Einstein

                            "The penalty good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men."
                            - Plato -

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ya know, they say a man is a hero, not for what he does, but for what he may have to do. It's these little things that make us unique. Like the FDNY slogan, "Ever willing, Ever ready".
                              "Ever Willing, Ever Ready."
                              FDNY, YOU WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X