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  • Rescue units

    I am trying to do some research on rescue type units or apparatus. I was wondering if anyone knows where you can find information on such units, what is the best sort of rig to set up, what sort of tools and gear they have on one and what is the best type of rescue. any advice or information anyone has for me would be appreciated. thank you.
    FF ONG
    Stay safe out there!

  • #2
    What is your possible rescue scenerios in your community...? do you have potential for swift water/trench/high angle/confined space? is this unit to be used as an extrication rig? How many personnel have to ride on it? Do you have an engine dedicated to run with it or does it have to have it's own small pump and water? Do you have air/light units or are you wanting to incorporate some of that into the truck?

    You have to decide what the function of your unit is before you can begin to look at the design of it. You have to look at your geographic response district to determine weight restrictions if any, or height requirements. You have to know how big the station doors are so you can back the new rig in...

    Planning is the most important step when it comes to making a decision on a new piece of apparatus.


    You can get some very helpful information for free from most major fire apparatus manufacturers.
    here are some links to a few companies.
    http://www.piercemfg.com/ http://www.evi-fl.com/ http://www.e-one.com/ http://www.americanlafrance.com/ http://www.svitrucks.com/

    Hope some of those thoughts will help.




    be safe brothers

    [ 09-28-2001: Message edited by: Scott Reasor ]
    Be safe brothers

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for your response. As I stated, I am trying to do some research of some different options. From what I can see, we would be using this rescue for extrication, we have minimal water rescue needs, not a very swift river, we have some need for rope rescues also. I am looking to incorporate it for extrication, rope and water. I also feel that we could use it for a support vehicle also, or I would like to see if that is possible to incorporate in it also. As in carrying packs, fans, etc. as needed. It would be rolling out with an engine or squad on MVAs/MVCs, so it would not need water or pumping abilities. I am in a district that has two engines, two squads and three tenders. We run out of two stations, we do alot of mutual aid with the city, and also have a major highway passing through our area. I am just trying to research possible options, so any and all advice is welcome.

      FF_ONG
      Stay safe out there!

      Comment


      • #4
        We run what would be considered a "Light Rescue." It's a Ford E-350 with a 12 foot cargo box.

        The rear has a roll up door that allows for "walk in" access. On the passanger side, a roll up door and pull out tray houses a generator. It only seats two, but we have room for a third and maybe a fourth seat if needed.

        For a light rescue, we have managed to stuff a lot of equipment into it. I started listing some of the basics and realized that it does carry a lot. Full Extrication and cribbing, two full sets of FR gear, basic water rescue, three SCBAs, eight spare bottles, and much more. I do have a complete inventory list here, but it is to long to post. (over 4 pages) Anyway, all of the cabinets are custom made to fit the equipment placed in them.

        We are a rural volunteer department that runs about 65% MVAs, 15% fires (vehicle, bush, structure) 15% First Responder calls, and 5% Misc. Calls (public assists, false alarms etc).

        We operate one Engine, one Rescue, one Rapid Attack, and one Tender. It runs to all our calls. MVAs and Medical it is often first out the door. Fires, it runs backup and support.

        Of course, that is just us. Make sure you do your research and get one that fits YOUR needs. The above sites should give you some starting points and contacts.
        "No one ever called the Fire Department for doing something smart..."

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        • #5
          Another thing you have to keep in mind is how much do you have alotted for the vehicle? I've seen ones that where $300,000.00 without any equipment. Also are you looking to buy new or used? Another thing to consider is it going to be a walkin or non walkin style what kind of Rescue are looking at building are you looking to have a light, medium or heavey rescue? Be sure to take into consideration the area you live when deciding on a Rescue. What I mean by this is are there a lot of back roads or dirt roads you may have to travel? If so you are not going to want some big monsterous Rescue thats gonna be too big to manuever or so heavey that you end up colapsing a small bridge due to the weight of the vehicle.
          When you are decideing what you want keep in mind the amount of equipment you intend to carry. Remember you don't want to overload the vehicle. Doing so increases the wear and tear on the components of the vehicle.
          If you do decide to go with a used vehicle there are many dealers with online sites and there are also many magazines that sale used apparatus. Even some of the major Fire Apparatus Manufacturers have used listings on there sites. There are many quality used pieces of apparatus out there all you have to do is look a little to find them.

          [ 09-29-2001: Message edited by: LtStick ]

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          • #6
            A couple of years ago we designed our rescue truck. We first started by brain storming with the rescue crews about what they thought should be carried and its capabilities. Next our truck committee (rescue personnel in this case) sorted out the ideas and built upon them. We thought about the F series heavy duty but when we looked at the amount of room we would need we went with a FL112 chassis. We also talked to manufacuters and went to other departments and looked at what they had. Its mainly set up for extrication but also carries our rope rescue gear and some confined space stuff. Rescue 1 is pictured on our departments web site. Just remember to leave room to grow. If you have questions let me know.
            Train like you want to fight.
            www.kvfd.net

            Comment


            • #7
              We have a Heavy Rescue Squad. Actualy, we have two. Our new one is a custom Seagrave with a walk in Saulsbury box. To check it out as well as see specs visitBerwyn Heights VFD web page. You can also see the many pictures of it in action at fires and wrecks.
              THE ABOVE REFLECTS MY OPINIONS AND IN NO WAY REFLECTS THOSE OF MY DEPARTMENT.

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              • #8
                I am a career f.f., and also a volunteer f.f. in my small hometown. In both depts. the rescue truck issue is at odds with manpower to staff such trucks. My idea for both depts. was the extrication pumpers or rescue pumpers. This handles the extrication and light rescue work, but heavy, collapse, haz-mat, trench rescue require large amounts of specific equipment that the resque engines simply cannot carry. Decide what resque capabilities you have, what you are going to have in the near future and then decide. The extrication engine is just what it says, a resque may be equipped to do everything from water resque to collapse rescue to lighting and air support. It should be set up for your dept.!!! From past expirience, I reccommend buying a new piece of equipment, and not someelses problem, or something that is close but does'nt quite meet your needs. I am a rescue LT. with expirience in specing apparatus, if you have any questions feel free to e-mail me, I am always willing to help my brothers and sisters! A famous toast that rings true today: "TO US, AND THOSE LIKE US, DAMN FEW LEFT". It is so true these days...Be safe..

                Comment


                • #9
                  One thing to consider in regards to water rescue is that there is a risk of swiftwater rescue everywhere, not just in areas with rivers. Flooding rains can make even the tamest creek a torrential river.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here is what I recommend to you. Make a list of everyhting you want to carry. Include the stuff you currently own and anything you are going to buy to be put on the truck. Then make a second list of possible things that you may buy in the future (3 to 10 yrs.) to add to this truck. Now you should be able to determine what size rescue you need to buy. I good source for info. is the training book Rescue company operations or Starting a Rescue Company or something like that. Not sure of the exact name. Certian States or Counties have specified equipment that you are required to carry to meet their designation as a rescue. Most break it down like this - Rescue-Engine, Light Rescue, Medium Rescue, and Heavy Rescue. In some places a Rescue-Engine must meet both NFPA specs. as an Engine and also local specs.as a light rescue as a minimum. I would also like to say that a hydraulic tool and two milk crates of cribbing does not any unit a Rescue or Rescue-Pumper. A big misconception. I have also seen Rescue-Pumpers with more equipment n them than some rescues. In the other hand I have seen full sized rescue units with hardly anything on them.
                    Here are some questions and suggestions to help you make this importent decission. Will this unit run out first or second on rescue calls? Will it also run any medical assist or QRS calls? How close is you next mutual aid engine? Does your department have enough manpower during the day to respond with two units and man they accordingly? What is your local area like?What are the typical roads like in your area?
                    How much stuff do you want to carry?
                    (See the list mentioned above)
                    What functions is this unit going to perform?
                    How many positions will be needed on this unit for personnel? Will this unit respond by itself on mutual aid to your surrounding departments? What budgetary amount of money are you allowed to spend to purchase this unit? If you can answer all of these questions you should know what type of rig to buy. I have been involved in the fire service for over 17 yrs. Just about every department I belonged to ran a rescue unit. My hometown department got into the rescue business just like you are planning. I held a line officer position in a department who operated a Heavy Rescue. I now am a paid Firefighter/EMT and still an active volunteer at the local V.F.D. 2 blocks from my home. I also sell fire apparatus and some specialty equipment as my part-time job. Since you are not in my area I do not consider you a potential customer and would be glad to help you in any way that I can. Please feel free to email me or send me a reply. Take care and be safe. FGN

                    Comment

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